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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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Supporting parents as essential care partners in neonatal units during the SARS‐CoV‐2 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Nicole R. van Veenendaal; Aniko Deierl; Fabiana Bacchini (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Acta Paediatrica

This study aims to review the evidence on safety of maintaining family integrated care practices and the effects of restricting parental participation in neonatal care during the SARS‐CoV‐2 pandemic. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINAHL databases were searched from inception to the 14th of October 2020. Records were included if they reported scientific, empirical research (qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods) on the effects of restricting or promoting family integrated care practices for parents of hospitalized neonates during the SARS‐CoV‐2 pandemic. Two authors independently screened abstracts, appraised study quality and extracted study and outcome data.

Care of hospitalized infants and their families during the COVID-19 pandemic: an international survey

AUTHOR(S)
Ita Litmanovitz; Dalia Silberstein; Samantha Butler (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Journal of Perinatology
This research study explored changes in family-centered care practices for hospitalized infants and families due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This exploratory descriptive study used a 49-item online survey, distributed to health care professionals working with hospitalized infants and families. The sample consisted of 96 participants from 22 countries.
COVID-19 exposure and family impact scales: factor structure and initial psychometrics

AUTHOR(S)
Anne E. Kazak; Melissa Alderfer; Paul T. Enlow

Published: March 2021   Journal: Journal of Pediatric Psychology
In response to the rapidly unfolding coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in spring 2020, a caregiver-report measure was developed aiming to understand the extent to which children and families were exposed to events related to COVID-19 and their perceptions of its impact. This article reports on the factor structure and psychometric properties of this measure.
Child and pet care‐planning during COVID‐19: considerations for the evolving family unit

AUTHOR(S)
Britni L. Adams; Jennifer W. Applebaum; Michelle N. Eliasson (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Family Relations

Using a mixed‐methods design, this paper aimed to understand household dynamics and choices in hypothetical planning for child and pet care if an individual is faced with hospitalization for COVID‐19. As the COVID‐19 public health crisis persists, children and pets are vulnerable to caregiver hospitalization.

The COVID‐19 pandemic and families in Japan

AUTHOR(S)
Tazuko Shibusawa; Chikako Ishii; Shinichi Nakamura (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Australian and New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy
This paper, which is authored by members of the Japanese Association of Family Therapy (JAFT), describes the COVID‐19 pandemic in Japan from a family systems perspective. It describes the course of the pandemic and the ways in which government policies to mitigate the pandemic have affected Japanese families. Challenges that affect Japanese families include the inability to participate in family and social rituals, prescribed gender roles that specifically affect women, high suicide rates, and prejudice against those who are at risk of spreading the infection. The need to shelter in place has also forced family homes to function as a workplace for parents, classrooms for children, and day care services for frail elders, which has resulted in psychological distress among individuals and conflicts among families.
‘Private family arrangements’ for children in Ireland: the informal grey space in-between state care and the family home

AUTHOR(S)
Kenneth Burns; Conor O’Mahony; Rebekah Brennan

Published: February 2021   Journal: The British Journal of Social Work
The literature on alternative care focuses overwhelmingly on formal, court-ordered placements; voluntary care placements are discussed less frequently. Least attention of all has been given to informal kinship care placements, where a child is cared for by relatives but is not formally in the legal care of state authorities. In Ireland, these placements, when facilitated by state authorities in lieu of a care order or voluntary care agreement, are known by professionals as ‘private family arrangements’. This article explores evidence which shows that the use of such arrangements is motivated partly by a concern for subsidiarity, and partly by necessity: they provide a source of placements in cases where regulatory requirements and a lack of resources would otherwise make the placement challenging or impossible.
Impact of COVID-19 on child poverty, education, protection and health

AUTHOR(S)
Katarina Kotoglou

Institution: Save the Children
Published: December 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected children’s lives and their rights in countries around the world. Sweeping measures such as school closures, home isolation, and social distancing have been implemented as a response to the pandemic, causing disruptions to children’s lives and impacting their right to survive, learn, and be protected.  Save the Children launched a global research study to generate evidence on how the COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent mitigation measures are affecting children’s health, nutrition, education and learning, protection and wellbeing, family incomes and jobs, and poverty. The research was implemented in 46 countries, making it the largest and most comprehensive survey of children and families during the COVID-19 pandemic to date. This report presents findings from the survey undertaken in Cambodia, between June and July 2020, with data from a sample of 730 caregivers and 730 children from the provinces of Pursat (Veal Veng district), Kampong Chhnang (Kampong Tralach) and Tboung Khmum (Ou Reang Ov district).

Impact of COVID-19 and lockdown on children with ADHD and their families: an online survey and a continuity care model

AUTHOR(S)
Ruchita Shah; V. Venkatesh Raju; Akhilesh Sharma (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Neurosciences in Rural Practice
Little is known about the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic on children with attention-deficit hyperkinetic disorder (ADHD). This study aimed to assess the impact of lockdown on children with the ADHD, and their families. Additionally, feasibility of carrying out “text message-based” intervention was evaluated. Methods An online survey was performed to evaluate the impact of lockdown on children with ADHD and their family members. Additionally, a “text message”-based intervention was performed over 2 weeks. Along with the text-based intervention, we also provided reading materials and an option of telephonic consultation.
Implementing group parent training in telepsychology: lessons learned during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Jason M. Fogler; Sébastien Normand; Nicole O’Dea (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Pediatric Psychology
This article examines telepsychology delivery to meet families’ needs during the COVID-19 pandemic. The review describes how to use treatment fidelity as a guiding principle to orient adaptations for telepsychology, as well as preliminary findings and early lessons learned in the implementation.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 45 | Issue: 9 | No. of pages: 983–989 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: COVID-19 response, family assistance, mental health services, parents, psychological counselling
Pregnant women with COVID-19 and risk of adverse birth outcomes and maternal-fetal vertical transmission: a population-based cohort study in Wuhan, China

AUTHOR(S)
Rong Yang; Hui Mei; Tongzhang Zheng (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: BMC Medicine volume
This is a retrospective cohort study based on the Maternal and Child Health Information System (MCHIMS) of Wuhan, China. All pregnant women with singleton live birth recorded by the system between January 13 and March 18, 2020, were included. The adverse birth outcomes were preterm birth, low birth weight, neonatal asphyxia, premature rupture of membrane (PROM), and cesarean section delivery. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate the associations between maternal COVID-19 diagnosis and adverse birth outcomes.
The impact of COVID-19 on children from poor families in Ghana and the role of welfare institutions

AUTHOR(S)
Lorretta Domfeh Owusu; Kwabena Frimpong-Manso

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Children's Services
This paper is focused on answering the following questions: How are poor families surviving in this era of COVID-19? What is life for children from poor families? What has become of their reality? To understand the realities of poor families and children during COVID-19, specifically in Ghana, this paper aims to analyze how COVID-19 has affected children from poor families in Ghana and how welfare institutions can work to provide rapid help to such families.
The role of palliative care in caring for the families of patients with COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Melissa Bakar; Elizabeth Capano; Melissa Patterson (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine
This study examines the role of palliative care for families of patients with Covid-19 in hospital settings. Multicomponenet interdisciplinary interventions have been implemented to enhance the ability to create a therapeutic alliance with family members and facilitate the provision of goal concordant care to patients with COVID-19. Findings show that families and patients benefit from targeted psycho-social support through the difficult process of making complex medical and end-of-life decisions during this unprecedented time.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 37 | Issue: 10 | No. of pages: 866-868 | Language: English | Topics: Health, Mental Health | Tags: COVID-19 response, family assistance | Countries: United States | Publisher: World Health Organisation
The impact of the Covid-19 lockdown on the experiences and feeding practices of new mothers in the UK: preliminary data from the COVID-19 New mum study

AUTHOR(S)
A. Vazquez-Vazquez ; S. Dib; J. C. Wells (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Appetite
The COVID-19 New Mum Study is recording maternal experiences and infant feeding during the UK lockdown. This report from week 1 of the survey describes and compares the delivery and post-natal experiences of women who delivered before the lockdown versus during the lockdown.
Embracing telehealth: supporting young children and families through occupational therapy in Singapore during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Hepsi Priyadharsini ; Jing Jing Chiang

Published: September 2020   Journal: World Federation of Occupational Therapists Bulletin
COVID-19 has significantly changed the way we work, play, and lead our everyday lives. It has caused serious public health, economic and social challenges, impacting individuals’ health and well-being. Our Occupational Therapy (OT) services at Child Development Unit (CDU), which is a hospital-based outpatient paediatric clinic, had to adapt to pandemic-related national policies to provide ongoing support and care for our patients and families. Healthcare services were required to leverage on teleconsultations and suspend physical consultations during the national ‘Circuit Breaker’ period. This disruption made us review our clinic workflows and service delivery options to comply with pandemic-related national measures. Our service continuity was maintained through teleconsultations, online parent workshops and developing online resources for community outreach. Though challenging, online platforms have continued to create new opportunities in providing care to our families, and supporting
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 76 | Issue: 2 | No. of pages: 90-93 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child care services, COVID-19 response, family assistance, health care facilities, lockdown, social distance | Countries: Singapore
Families under confinement: COVID-19, domestic violence, and alcohol consumption

AUTHOR(S)
Adan Silverio-Murillo; Jose Roberto Balmori de la Miyar; Lauren Hoehn-Velasco

Published: September 2020
Does the COVID-19 stay-at-home order increase domestic violence? The significant decline in household income combined with prolonged confinement with the potential assailant may increase household conflict. Despite these plausible reasons for an increase in household violence, economic theory predicts that domestic violence depends on the income distribution within the household. To test these effects empirically, we estimate the impact of the COVID-19 lockdown on domestic violence using two different data sources in Mexico City. First, we utilize call-center data from a domestic violence hotline (Línea Mujeres), and, then, we corroborate the call-center findings using official police reports.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.