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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1 - 15 of 89
Family responsibilities and mental health of kindergarten educators during the first COVID-19 pandemic lockdown in Ontario, Canada.

AUTHOR(S)
Natalie Spadafora; Caroline Reid-Westoby; Molly Pottruff (et al.)

Published: May 2022   Journal: Teaching and Teacher Education
The present study, conducted during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Ontario, Canada, addressed the association between family responsibilities and mental health (depression and anxiety) among kindergarten educators. Participants comprised 1790 (97.9% female) kindergarten educators (73.6% kindergarten teachers; 26.4% early childhood educators) across Ontario.
Enduring COVID-19 lockdowns: Risk versus resilience in parents’ health and family functioning across the pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Nickola C. Overall; Rachel S. T. Low; Valerie T. Chang (et al.)

Published: May 2022   Journal: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
Have the demands of the COVID-19 pandemic risked declines in parents’ health and family functioning, or have most parents been resilient and shown no changes in health and family functioning? Assessing average risk versus resilience requires examining how families have fared across the pandemic, beyond the initial months examined in prior investigations. The current research examines changes in parents’ health and functioning over the first 1.5 years of the pandemic. Parents (N = 272) who had completed general pre-pandemic assessments completed reassessments of psychological/physical health, couple/family functioning, and parenting within two mandatory lockdowns in New Zealand: at the beginning of the pandemic (26 March–28 April 2020) and 17 months later (18 August–21 September 2021).
Family day care educators’ ability to support children’s mental wellbeing and the impact of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Zoi Triandafilidis; Ashleigh Old; Tanya Hanstock (et al.)

Published: May 2022   Journal: Journal of Early Childhood Research
The childcare setting is a critical environment to observe, and also influence, children’s mental wellbeing. However, little research has examined the experiences and ability of Australian family day care (FDC) educators in supporting children’s mental wellbeing. The present study aimed to explore how training, COVID-19, and partnerships influence FDC educators’ ability to promote children’s mental wellbeing. Seven FDC educators engaged in semi-structured interviews, and thematic analysis identified six themes. These were (1) more than a babysitter; (2) experience is the best teacher; (3) close and supportive relationships, which included a sense of exile as a subordinate theme; (4) it takes a village to raise a child; (5) fear and uncertainty; and (6) business and relational difficulties.
Lockdown practices: a portrait of young people in the family during the first lockdown in Portugal

AUTHOR(S)
Ana Sofia Ribeiro; Maria Manuel Vieira; Ana Nunes de Almeida

Published: April 2022   Journal: Journal of Youth Studies
Governments introduced protective public health measures, including lockdowns and social distancing, in response to the unprecedented global crisis brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic. For young people, such measures are particularly painful, as they entail an interruption of their transitions to adulthood, which generally require taking up their position in the public space and emerging as a recognised social peer, either through leaving the parental home, initiating an intimate relationship or getting a full-time job. In Portugal, where such transitions are often postponed, and young people cohabit with parents for much longer, lockdown meant withdrawal from the public space and living in an intensive family collective. This brought many challenges and created tension. Based on the results of a non-representative online survey on the impacts of the pandemic in Portugal, this article focuses how young people aged 16–24 adapted to the 2020 lockdown, using the conceptual lens of familialism. The results show that familialism remains a key support system in adversity, evidencing intergenerational solidarity through everyday practices of resilience and (self-) care, renewing and remaking social bonds. Individual distancing practices are deployed backstage, however, mitigating and nuancing the overwhelming hold of familialism.
The voices of parents in child protective services: A qualitative analysis of families’ struggles with COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Karmen Toros; Asgeir Falch-Eriksen

Published: April 2022
The pandemic of the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has affected children and families worldwide, disrupting their daily lives and well-being. A small-scale study involving 13 parents in Child Protective Services in Estonia was conducted using in-depth, semi-structured interviews to explore parents’ experiences with COVID-19 and its impact on their families’ well-being.
Rightly blamed the ‘bad guy’? Grandparental childcare and COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Christina Boll; Till Nikolka

Published: April 2022   Journal: Journal of Public Finance and Public Choice
This study explores the link between regular grandparental childcare and SARS-CoV-2 infection rates at the level of German counties. This analysis suggests that a region’s infection rates are shaped by region-, household- and individual-specific parameters. It extensively draws on the latter, exploring the intra- and extra-familial mechanisms fuelling individual contact frequency to test the potential role of regular grandparental childcare in explaining overall infection rates.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 37 | Issue: 1 | No. of pages: 23 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, COVID-19, disease prevention, disease transmission, family environment, infectious disease, pandemic | Countries: Germany
Children’s well-being and intra-household family relationships during the first COVID-19 lockdown in France

AUTHOR(S)
Ariane Pailhé; Lidia Panico; Anne Solaz

Published: April 2022   Journal: Journal of Family Research

This article explores the consequences of the first COVID-19 lockdown in the spring of 2020 in France on intra-family relationships and 9-year-old children's socio-emotional well-being. On 17th March 2020, France began a strict lockdown to contain the COVID-19 pandemic, with school closures and limited outings permitted until early June. All family routines and work-life arrangements were impacted. A major concern relates to how these measures impacted family and child well-being.

Family resilience and adolescent mental health during COVID-19: a moderated mediation model

AUTHOR(S)
Ran Zhuo; Yanhua Yu; Xiaoxue Shi

Published: April 2022   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted and is still impacting people’s lives, including physical and mental health. Family plays an important role in adolescent mental health due to the long staying at home. This paper aimed to investigate the impact of family resilience on adolescent mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic, and the mediation role of pandemic stress perception and the moderation role of meta-mood. A total of 2691 Chinese adolescents were recruited using convenient sampling. Their mental health, family resilience, pandemic stress perception and meta-mood were surveyed.
Family resilience during COVID-19 pandemic: a literature review

AUTHOR(S)
Maria Gayatri; Dian Kristiani Irawaty

Published: April 2022   Journal: The Family Journal
The COVID-19 pandemic has spread rapidly in many countries. This pandemic has led to short-term as well as long-term psychosocial and mental health implications for all family members. The magnitude of family resilience is determined by many vulnerability factors like developmental age, educational status, preexisting mental health condition, being economically underprivileged or being quarantined due to infection or fear of infection. PubMed, SCOPUS, MEDLINE, Google Scholar, Cochrane, and ProQuest were searched from the inception of the pandemic to December 31, 2020. Articles were screened for inclusion by Authors.
Family systems cultural and resilience dimensions to consider in nutrition interventions: exploring preschoolers’ eating and physical activity routines during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Pamela Rothpletz-Puglia; Erika Ryan; Veronica M. Jones (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior

This study aims to describe the weight-related family functioning of racial minority families with low income using family systems theory as an interpretive framework. Primarily a qualitative study with interviews plus; descriptive demographics, anthropometrics, a family functioning measure, and food insecurity screening.

A qualitative examination of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on children and adolescents with autism and their parents

AUTHOR(S)
Jenna Stadheim; Ashley Johns; Melissa Mitchell (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Research in Developmental Disabilities

The unprecedented challenges introduced by the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic may be amplified for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and their families. The current study aimed to describe the experiences of children with ASD and their families during the pandemic and to identify the needs of this community during emergency situations.

Food and beverage offerings by parents of preschoolers: a daily survey study of dinner offerings during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Jennifer M. Barton

Published: April 2022   Journal: Appetite
The COVID-19 pandemic is likely to have altered parents' daily feeding practices, including what and how much they feed their children, which may have negative implications for children's weight. The primary aim of this study was to examine patterns of and variation in parents' daily food and beverage offerings at dinner across 10 days during the COVID-19 pandemic using descriptive analysis and non-parametric tests. Ninety-nine parents (Mage = 32.90, SDage = 5.60) of children ages 2–4 years (M = 2.82, SD = 0.78) completed an online baseline survey and 10 daily surveys (929 completed surveys) assessing their daily food and beverage offerings at dinner. On average, parents did not offer recommended foods and beverages on a daily basis; parents offered vegetables and protein most often across the 10 days, however, less than 50% of parents offered the recommended serving size for each group.
The role of family support and conflict in cyberbullying and subjective well-being among Chilean Adolescents during the Covid-19 period

AUTHOR(S)
Matías E. Rodriguez-Rivas; Jorge J. Varela; Constanza González (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Heliyon

Life satisfaction plays a crucial role in integral development and mental health during childhood and adolescence. Recently, it has been shown that cyberbullying has severe consequences for the mental health and wellbeing of victims such as increased anxiety, depressive symptoms and even suicide risk. Although the role of the family in life satisfaction and cyberbullying behaviors has been studied, there is limited information on its impacts during the current pandemic period. The aim of this study is to determine the role of family variables regarding students' levels of life satisfaction and cyberbullying victimization during the pandemic period.

Families’ and professionals’ perspectives of building and maintaining engagement in telepractice early intervention for young children with communication disability

AUTHOR(S)
Felipe Retamal-Walter; Monique Waite; Nerina Scarinci

Published: March 2022   Journal: Disability and Rehabilitation

This paper aimed to explore and describe families’ and professionals’ perspectives about building and maintaining engagement in telepractice early intervention (EI). Individual semi-structured reflexive interviews were conducted with Australian families of young children with communication disability receiving telepractice EI and their treating professionals. These interviews were conducted within one day of a telepractice EI session and analysed using thematic analysis.

Companionship and worries in uncertain times: Australian parents’ experiences of children and pets during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Shannon K. Bennets; Sharinne B. Crawford; Tiffani Howell (et al.)

Published: March 2022   Journal: Anthrozoös
Companion animals (pets), especially cats and dogs, have featured regularly in the media and public discourse during the global COVID-19 pandemic, including increased demand for pet adoption and more time spent with existing pets. This qualitative study aimed to describe the experiences of Australian parents with a child under 18 years and a cat or dog. Within a broader survey, parents were asked open-ended questions about the benefits and challenges for their family of living with a cat or dog during COVID-19, and where relevant, about reasons for adopting a new pet. Data were collected between July and October 2020, during Australia’s “second wave” of COVID-19, when some Australians were subject to strict physical distancing or “stay at home” orders. A total of 611 parents provided at least one free-text response.
1 - 15 of 89

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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The first digest covers children and youth mental health under COVID-19.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.