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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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Family satisfaction with ICU communication during the COVID-19 pandemic: a prospective multi-centre Australian study

AUTHOR(S)
Mallikarjuna Reddy Ponnapa Reddy; Umesh Kadam; John Dong Young Lee (et al.)

Published: November 2022   Journal: Internal Medicine Journal

Virtual communication has become common practice during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic because of visitation restrictions. The authors aimed to evaluate overall family satisfaction with the intensive care unit (FS-ICU) care involving virtual communication strategies during the COVID-19 pandemic period. In this prospective multicentre study involving three metropolitan hospitals in Melbourne, Australia, the next of kin (NOK) of all eligible ICU patients between 1 July 2020 and 31 October 2020 were requested to complete an adapted version of the FS-ICU 24-questionnaire. Group comparisons were analysed and calculated for family satisfaction scores: ICU/care (satisfaction with care), FS-ICU/dm (satisfaction with information/decision-making) and FS-ICU/total (overall satisfaction with the ICU). The essential predictors that influence family satisfaction were identified using quantitative and qualitative analyses.

The impact of COVID-19 pandemic on family well-being: a literature review

AUTHOR(S)
Maria Gayatri; Mardiana Dwi Puspitasari

Published: October 2022   Journal: The Family Journal
COVID-19 has changed family life, including employment status, financial security, the mental health of individual family members, children's education, family well-being, and family resilience. The aim of this study is to analyze the previous studies in relation to family well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic. A literature review was conducted on PubMed, Medline, Web of Science, and Scopus for studies using a cross-sectional or quasi-experimental design published from their inception to October 15, 2020, using the keywords “COVID-19,” “pandemic,” “coronavirus,” “family,” “welfare,” “well-being,” and “resilience.” A manual search on Google Scholar was used to find relevant articles based on the eligibility criteria in this study. The presented conceptual framework is based on the family stress model to link the inherent pandemic hardships and the family well-being.
Adapting to adversity: effects of COVID-19 on parenting in Chile

AUTHOR(S)
J. Carola Pérez; Daniela Aldoney; Anastassia Vivanco-Carlevari (et al.)

Published: July 2022   Journal: Frontiers in Psychology
The pandemic outbreak in March 2020 and its associated sanitary regulations and restrictions triggered an abrupt and significant change for society in general and for families’ organization in particular. In Chile, the Santiago Metropolitan District was under a strict lockdown that involved the closure of the entire educational system. From a systemic-family stress perspective, the impact of these changes might have consequences not only for each individual family member, but for the parental dynamic and, consequently, for children’s well-being. This paper presents the results of a follow-up study showing changes in self-reported parental depression and the perceived home organization of mothers and fathers assessed at three different moments: before the pandemic, at the initial outbreak, and after 1 month of strict lockdown. Relevant moderators were explored using linear mixed models to understand the within-subject changes in mothers’ and fathers’ self-reports across the different assessment times. Financial strain, personality traits of self-criticism and dependency, previous parent–child quality interaction, recent major stressful events, and number of children are highlighted as relevant factors that moderate changes in home chaos and parental mental health perception. Significant risks and protective factors are described for fathers and mothers. The use of pre-pandemic measures as baseline levels enabled the identification of personal and family characteristics that were related to better outcomes.
Returning to normal in an abnormal environment: mothers' COVID-19 uncertainties and uncertainty management strategies

AUTHOR(S)
Kimberly K. Walker; Gregory D. Zimet

Published: June 2022   Journal: Journal of Family Communication
This study used uncertainty management theory to assess mothers’ COVID-19-related uncertainty sources and management strategies during the Delta variant outbreak as the fall 2021 school year approached. Twenty-five mothers living in Indiana were interviewed between July-August 2021. Data indicated four uncertainty sources: COVID-19 illness risk, children’s psychological health, reintegration, and COVID-19 vaccine/prevention rights. COVID-19 illness risk was the most prominent uncertainty theme, and mothers attempted to adapt to it when they could via strategies of strategic decision making, engaging in protective behaviors, and seeking information to guide decisions about their children’s safety. The start of school presented uncertainties about young children’s COVID-19 risk they deemed out of their control, and thus mothers reframed illness uncertainty as the responsibility of others to protect their children.
Coronavirus changed the rules on everything”: parent perspectives on how the COVID-19 Pandemic Influenced family routines, relationships and technology use in families with infants

AUTHOR(S)
Rebecca Hood; Juliana Zabatiero; Desiree Silva (et al.)

Published: December 2021   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
This study explores how the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic influenced family routines, relationships and technology use (smartphones and tablet computers) among families with infants. Infancy is known to be an important period for attachment security and future child development, and a time of being susceptible to changes within and outside of the family unit. A qualitative design using convenience sampling was employed. A total of 30 mothers in Perth, Western Australia participated in semi-structured interviews by audio or video call. All mothers were parents of infants aged 9 to 15 months old. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed, and data were analysed using thematic analysis to code and identify themes in an inductive manner.
Impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on family mental health in Canada: findings from a multi-round cross-sectional study

AUTHOR(S)
Kimberly C. Thomson; Emily Jenkins; Randip Gill (et al.)

Published: November 2021   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Pandemic-related disruptions, including school, child care, and workplace closures, financial stressors, and relationship challenges, present unique risks to families’ mental health. We examined the mental health impacts of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic among parents with children <18 years old living at home over three study rounds in May 2020 (n = 618), September 2020 (n = 804), and January 2021 (n = 602). Data were collected using a cross-sectional online survey of adults living in Canada, nationally representative by age, gender, household income, and region. Chi-square tests and logistic regression compared outcomes between parents and the rest of the sample, among parent subgroups, and over time. Parents reported worsened mental health compared with before the pandemic, as well as not coping well, increased alcohol use, increased suicidal thoughts/feelings, worsened mental health among their children, and increases in both negative and positive parent–child interactions. Mental health challenges were more frequently reported among parents with pre-existing mental health conditions, disabilities, and financial/relationship stressors. Increased alcohol use was more frequently reported among younger parents and men. Sustained mental health challenges of parents throughout nearly a year of the pandemic suggest that intervention efforts to support family mental health may not be adequately meeting families’ needs.
Contrasts and ambivalences in French parents’ experiences regarding changes in eating and cooking behaviours during the COVID-19 lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Kaat Philippe; Sylvie Issanchou; Sandrine Monnery-Patris

Published: September 2021   Journal: Food Quality and Preference
Using open-ended questions, this study explored parents’ experiences regarding changes in their family’s food-related behaviours during the first COVID-19 lockdown in France (March-May 2020). Parents (N=498, 72% mothers) of children aged 3-12 years described which food-related changes they (1) perceived as positive during the lockdown, (2) perceived as negative, and (3) would like to maintain after the lockdown. A thematic analysis revealed that parents appreciated the choice of more local, fresh foods, the time to prepare food (home-made dishes, new recipes) and cooking and eating together with the family. In contrast, some parents highlighted a burden imposed by the increased food preparation at home. They also described a higher intake of unhealthy, palatable food (or the temptation to do so), and weight concerns. Parents would like to maintain their choice of local, fresh foods, and to continue spending more time together around food but doubt the feasibility after the lockdown. The results revealed many inter- and intra-individual contrasts in parents’ answers. An ambivalent attitude toward food pleasure was demonstrated: the sensory/commensal pleasure of eating versus the concerns about an increased intake of pleasurable food. Additionally, gender differences were observed: mothers perceived the preparation of additional meals, for example, more often as a burden than fathers. This study revealed intimate perceptions of the impact of the lockdown on eating habits in families. They give insight into possible facilitators and barriers (e.g., time) for the adoption of recommended eating and cooking behaviours in families, beyond the pandemic.
Consensually nonmonogamous parent relationships during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Melissa H. Manley; Abbie E. Goldberg

Published: May 2021   Journal: Sexualities
During the COVID-19 pandemic, parents in consensually nonmonogamous (CNM) relationships navigated public health directives to social distance and avoid contact between households. Many parents practicing CNM share romantic, sexual, and coparenting relationships across households, and the pandemic introduced challenges and opportunities for innovation in maintaining connection. This qualitative study sought to explore the experiences, challenges, and adaptations of CNM parents, using survey and interview data from 70 US parents collected between May and December 2020. Thematic analysis highlighted that many parents spent less time with non-cohabiting partners and more time with cohabiting partners and children, but also adapted via creative strategies such as incorporating partners into a quarantine pod, inviting partners to move in, or connecting over technology. These data illuminate the diverse ways that CNM parents engaged in and “queered” family and partner relationships during the pandemic.
Parents and children during the COVID-19 quarantine process: experiences from Turkey and China

AUTHOR(S)
Mehmet Toran; Ramazan Sak; Yuwei Xu (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Journal of Early Childhood Research
This paper reports Turkish and Chinese parents’ experiences with their 3–6 year-old children during the COVID-19 quarantine process. Thirteen Turkish and 11 Chinese parents participated in a study that employed semi-structured interviews to examine participant self-perceived experiences.
Examining the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on family mental health in Canada: findings from a national cross-sectional study

AUTHOR(S)
Anne C. Gadermann; Kimberly C. Thomson; Chris G. Richardson (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: BMJ Open
In the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, social isolation, school/child care closures and employment instability have created unprecedented conditions for families raising children at home. This study describes the mental health impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on families with children in Canada.
SARS-CoV-2 transmission in an urban community: the role of children and household contacts

AUTHOR(S)
Chaya Pitman-Hunt; Jacqueline Leja; Zahra M. Jiwani

Published: November 2020   Journal: Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society
This is a single center US retrospective study of infection patterns among household sick contacts of children with confirmed Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome – Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in an urban setting. A household sick contact (HHSC) was identified in fewer than half (42%) of patients and no child-to-adult transmission was identified.
Stress, resilience, and well-being in Italian children and their parents during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Maria Cusinato; Sara Iannattone; Andrea Spoto (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak has forced parents and children to adopt significant changes in their daily routine, which has been a big challenge for families, with important implications for family stress. This study aims to analyze the potential risk and protective factors for parents’ and children’s well-being during a potentially traumatic event such as the COVID-19 quarantine. Specifically, it investigates parents’ and children’s well-being, parental stress, and children’s resilience. The study involved 463 Italian parents of children aged 5–17.
The psychological impact of COVID-19 on the families of first-line rescuers

AUTHOR(S)
Zhiling Feng; Lizhi Xu; Peng Cheng (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Indian Journal of Psychiatry
Under the COVID-19 epidemic, the families of front-line rescue workers are under unusual pressure. This paper aims to understand the extent of their psychological distress in this epidemic and whether they have received sufficient support. Thus targeted to provide support for them and indirectly reduce the concerns of the rescue workers.
Alone with the kids: tele-medicine for children with special healthcare needs during COVID-19 emergency

AUTHOR(S)
Livio Provenzi; Serena Grumi; Renato Borgatti

Published: September 2020   Journal: Frontiers in Psychology
The COVID-19 pandemic is asking specialists in the field of child neuropsychiatry and rehabilitation to at least partially shift to tele-medicine programs. This unprecedented period of healthcare and socio-economic crisis can become an opportunity. Indeed, by improving our ability to use innovative technologies to respond to the special healthcare needs of children with disability and their families, we may proceed forward to build more inclusive societies and smarter healthcare systems.
Burden of illness in households with severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2–infected children

AUTHOR(S)
Mehgan F. Teherani; Carol M. Kao; Andres Camacho-Gonzalez (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society
This study investigated of illness among household members of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)–infected children receiving medical care (n = 32). The study identified 144 household contacts (HCs): 58 children and 86 adults. Forty-six percent of HCs developed symptoms consistent with coronavirus disease. Child-to-adult transmission was suspected in 7 cases.
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