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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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COVID-19 exposure and family impact scales: factor structure and initial psychometrics

AUTHOR(S)
Anne E. Kazak; Melissa Alderfer; Paul T. Enlow

Published: March 2021   Journal: Journal of Pediatric Psychology
In response to the rapidly unfolding coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in spring 2020, a caregiver-report measure was developed aiming to understand the extent to which children and families were exposed to events related to COVID-19 and their perceptions of its impact. This article reports on the factor structure and psychometric properties of this measure.
A little autonomy support goes a long way: daily autonomy‐supportive parenting, child well‐being, parental need fulfillment, and change in child, family, and parent adjustment across the adaptation to the COVID‐19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Andreas B. Neubauer; Andrea Schmidt; Andrea C. Kramer (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Child Development
This study examined the effects of daily parental autonomy support on changes in child behavior, family environment, and parental well‐being across 3 weeks during the COVID‐19 pandemic in Germany. Day‐to‐day associations among autonomy‐supportive parenting, parental need fulfillment, and child well‐being were also assessed.
A crisis for a system in crisis: forecasting from the short‐ and long‐term impacts of COVID‐19 on the child welfare system

AUTHOR(S)
Kristen Pisani‐Jacques Pisani‐Jacques

Published: October 2020   Journal: Family Court Review
The COVID‐19 pandemic has thrust the world into a crisis – and the child welfare system is particularly susceptible to its effects. This pandemic has exacerbated some of the most problematic aspects of the system, and its impacts will reverberate long after the immediate crisis ends. As COVID‐19 spread, families were instantly impacted – in‐person family time was cancelled, youth and families were unable to access basic resources, services, and technology, and access to the courts was curtailed.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 58 | Issue: 4 | No. of pages: 955-964 | Language: English | Topics: Child Protection, Health | Tags: child care services, child welfare, COVID-19 response, family welfare
How COVID-19 is placing vulnerable children at risk and why we need a different approach to child welfare

AUTHOR(S)
Todd I. Herrenkohl; Debbie Scott; Daryl J. Higgins (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Child Maltreatment
The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic brings new worries about the welfare of children, particularly those of families living in poverty and impacted other risk factors. These children will struggle more during the pandemic because of financial pressures and stress placed on parents, as well as their limited access to services and systems of support. In this commentary, we explain how current circumstances reinforce the need for systemic change within statutory child welfare systems and the benefits that would accrue by implementing a continuum of services that combine universal supports with early intervention strategies. We also focus on promising approaches consistent with goals for public health prevention and draw out ideas related workforce development and cross-sector collaboration.
Well-being of parents and children during the COVID-19 pandemic: a national survey

AUTHOR(S)
Stephen W. Patrick; Laura E. Henkhaus; Joseph S. Zickafoose (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Pediatrics

This national survey examines how the pandemic and mitigation efforts affected the physical and emotional well-being of parents and children in the United States. Since March 2020, 27% of parents reported worsening mental health for themselves, and 14% reported worsening behavioral health for their children. The proportion of families with moderate or severe food insecurity increased from 6% before March 2020 to 8% after, employer-sponsored insurance coverage of children decreased from 63% to 60%, and 24% of parents reported a loss of regular child care. Worsening mental health for parents occurred alongside worsening behavioral health for children in nearly 1 in 10 families, among whom 48% reported loss of regular child care, 16% reported change in insurance status, and 11% reported worsening food security. The study concludes that coronavirus disease pandemic has had a substantial tandem impact on parents and children in the United States. As policy makers consider additional measures to mitigate the health and economic effects of the pandemic, they should consider the unique needs of families with children.

 

Rapid return of children in residential care to family as a result of COVID-19: scope, challenges, and recommendations

AUTHOR(S)
Nicole Gilbertson Wilke; Amanda Hiles Howard; Philip Goldman

Published: September 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect

The goal of the study is to provide data-informed guidance and recommendations for public and private service providers working in nations in which children outside of parental care, especially those in residential care, have been rapidly returned to households due to COVID-19. This knowledge will allow for a better understanding of the situation of the rapid return of children due to COVID-19, its impact on children and families, and how service providers can best support them following this transition.

Screening for economic hardship for child welfare-involved families during the COVID-19 pandemic: a rapid partnership response

AUTHOR(S)
Barbara Fallon; Rachael Lefebvre; Delphine Collin-Vézina (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect
Given the range of negative consequences related to the pandemic and the evolving supports available to families, child protection workers needed a clinical tool to guide and support work with families informed by an understanding of economic hardship. The objective of this paper is to report on the development and implementation strategy of a tool to be used for practice intervention during the pandemic.
Shifting from survival to supporting resilience in children and families in the COVID-19 pandemic: lessons for informing U.S. mental health priorities

AUTHOR(S)
Abigail M. Stark; Allison E. White; Nancy S. Rotter (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Psychological trauma : theory, research, practice and policy
This commentary contextualizes potential mental health outcomes for children during and after the COVID-19 pandemic within the risk and resilience literature. Individual, familial, and community-level factors that may increase risk for mental health challenges for children as well as factors associated with positive adaptation in the face of adversity are considered.
Cite this research | Vol.: 12 | Issue: s1 | No. of pages: s133-135 | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: family welfare, mental health services, resiliency | Countries: United States
Impact assessment of COVID-19 outbreak on wellbeing of children and families in Albania
Institution: World Vision Albania
Published: May 2020
This impact assessment aims to highlight the urgent, medium and long-term needs of families and children in Albania as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic in Albania. The assessment methodology has an exploratory approach that involved the collection of socio and economic data related to Albanian families during the lockdown period.
15 ways to support young children and their families in the COVID-19 response
Institution: The World Bank
Published: April 2020
As the global COVID-19 (Coronavirus) pandemic continues to unfold, young children will be especially vulnerable. World Bank teams can work with client countries to support early childhood development (ECD) by leveraging a range of interventions and mechanisms that will be part of the COVID-19 (Coronavirus) response in every country. The report has three key messages : The early years are a critical period to build human capital. Young children are disproportionately at risk and must be prioritized in COVID-19 (Coronavirus) responses. We will reach young children by supporting parents and caregivers.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.