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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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Emotional status, stress and insomnia in pediatric healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Pelin Elibol; Kayı Eliaçık; Alper Çiçek (et al.)

Published: August 2022   Journal: Clinical Research
Facing the critical situation of the pandemic, healthcare professionals are directly involved in the diagnosis, treatment, and care of patients with COVID-19 in the front line and they are at risk of developing psychological distress and other mental health symptoms. Here it is aimed to determine where the child clinic staff stand in terms of the psychological burden of the disease. A hundred and fifty-one eligible physicians and nurses working in the Clinic of Pediatric, University of Health Sciences Turkey, İzmir Tepecik Education and Research Hospital who answered a web-based questionnaire between 10-20 June 2020 were included in the study. Socio-demographic questions, Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21), and Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) were used to evaluate the psychological determinants of the healthcare workers.
HIV and SRH healthcare delivery experiences of South African healthcare workers and adolescents and young people during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Jane Kelly; Lesley Gittings; Christina Laurenzi (et al.)

Published: August 2022   Journal: Psychology, Health & Medicine
While substantial research has emerged from the frontlines of the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as from studies with adolescent populations, there has been a dearth of research focused in South Africa on the context-specific experiences of healthcare workers (HCWs) and the adolescents and young people (AYP) to whom they provide services. This article documents the experiences of provision and receipt of HIV and sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services during the COVID-19 pandemic from the perspective of South African HCWs (n = 13) and AYP (n = 41, ages 17–29).
Childhood COVID-19 vaccine acceptance and preference from caregivers and healthcare workers in China: a survey experiment

AUTHOR(S)
Zhiyuan Hou; Kuimeng Song; Qian Wang (et al.)

Published: August 2022   Journal: Preventive Medicine
With approval of more COVID-19 vaccines for children, vaccine attributes may influence parental acceptance and choices. This study aimed to assess effects of vaccine attributes and information on herd immunity on childhood COVID-19 vaccine acceptance. A survey experiment was conducted with caregivers of children aged 6 months to 11 years old and health care workers (HCWs) in China from September 14 to November 18, 2021. Respondents were randomly assigned to receive differing information on herd immunity (> 80% of the entire population must be vaccinated; or no information). Respondents then completed eight discrete choice tasks to assess vaccine acceptance based on attributes. 2331 (90.07%) of 2588 surveyed caregivers and 1576 (92.71%) of 1700 surveyed HCWs would accept COVID-19 vaccination for children, respectively.
Women at the last mile: how investments in gender equality have kept health systems running during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Anushka Kalyanpur; Ihlas Altinci; Emmanuel Ojwang (et al.)

Institution: CARE
Published: May 2022
Even before COVID-19, investments in health systems—and especially female health workers—were too low. In 2019 the world had a gap of 18 million health workers. Two years and fifteen million deaths later, we have at least 26 million fewer health workers than we need. , This leaves us severely underprepared for future pandemics and other major shocks to the health system, including conflict and climate change. We must invest in health systems that don’t just meet the needs of today, but that are also resilient in the face of future shocks. Pandemic preparedness requires gender equality: equal recognition, support, and fair pay for ALL health workers. Globally, 70% of health workers are women, but half of their work is unpaid. We must do more to support these health workers. The glimmers of success in COVID-19 built on previous investments in women health workers, their skills, and equality in health systems. Pre-existing investments in equality helped systems respond to COVID-19. Increased investments will build better resilience for the crises that come next. This report highlights case studies and lessons learned from 20 countries during COVID-19.
Impact of COVID-19 on carers of children with tracheostomies

AUTHOR(S)
Nicola Hall; Nikki Rousseau; David W. Hamilton (et al.)

Published: December 2021   Journal: Archives of Disease in Childhood
This study aims to explore the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the experiences of caregivers of children with tracheostomies. All participants were currently, or had previously cared for, a tracheostomised child who had attended a tertiary care centre in the North of England. Health professionals were purposively sampled to include accounts from a range of professions from primary, community, secondary and tertiary care.
Mental health and well-being impacts of COVID-19 on rural paramedics, police, community nurses and child protection workers

AUTHOR(S)
Russell Roberts; Alfred Wong; Stacey Jenkins (et al.)

Published: September 2021   Journal: Australian Journal of Rural Health

This study aims to investigate the impact of COVID-19 on the mental health and well-being of rural paramedics, police, community nursing and child protection staff. An online survey was distributed to investigate the sources of stress and support across individual, task and organisational domains. The survey was completed by 1542 paramedics, police, community nurses and child protection workers from all states and territories of Australia. This study describes the data for the 632 rural participants. The main measures of well-being were the Public Health Questionnaire (PHQ9), the Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD7), the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), workplace engagement, intention to quit and COVID-19–related stress.

Parental acceptability of COVID-19 vaccination for children under the age of 18 years among Chinese doctors and nurses: a cross-sectional online survey

AUTHOR(S)
Zixin Wang; Rui She; Xi Chen (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics
This study investigated parental acceptability of COVID-19 vaccination for children under the age of 18 years among Chinese parents who are healthcare workers. A closed online survey among full-time doctors or nurses employed by the five collaborative hospitals who had access to smartphones was conducted. Facilitated by the hospital administrators, prospective participants received an invitation sent by the research team via the existing WeChat/QQ groups to complete an online questionnaire. A total of 2,281 participants completed the survey. This study was a sub-analysis of 1332 participants who had at least one child under the age of 18 years. Among the participants, 44.5% reported that they would likely or very likely to have their children under the age of 18 years take up COVID-19 vaccination in the next six months.
Psychosocial outcomes of COVID-19 pandemic on healthcare workers in maternity services

AUTHOR(S)
Recep Erin; Yeşim Bayoğlu Tekin

Published: June 2021   Journal: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics & Gynecology

This study investigated the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak on social support and anxiety levels in healthcare professionals working in maternity services situated in Trabzon, Turkey. It was designed retrospectively and observationally. Social support to the participants was measured using a scale called the multidimensional scale of perceived social support (MSPSS). State anxiety scale (STAI TX-1) and trait anxiety scale (STAI TX-2) were used to determine the level of anxiety. All scales were measured before and during the pandemic. Independent t-test and one-way ANOVA were used to analyze the data where p < 0.05 was considered significant.

Mental health of children of health workers during the COVID-19 pandemic: a cross-sectional study

AUTHOR(S)
Habip Almis; Behice Han Almis; Ibrahim Hakan Bucak

Published: June 2021   Journal: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
Children are exposed to large amounts of information and high levels of stress and anxiety from adults around them, the media, and social communication networks during the Covid-19 period. The purpose of this study was to compare the anxiety and depression levels of the children of health workers following the declaration by the World Health Organization (WHO) of Covid-19 as a global pandemic with those of age-matched children of non-health worker parents. This prospective, case-controlled, cross-sectional study was performed between July and September 2020.
Addressing pediatric mental health using telehealth during COVID-19 and beyond: A narrative review

AUTHOR(S)
Natoshia R. Cunningham; Samantha L. Ely; Brittany N. Barber Garcia (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: Academic Pediatrics
The pediatrician continues to serve as a frontline provider addressing patients’ medical and mental health needs, yet COVID-19 is reshaping the way physicians deliver such care. Pediatricians are increasingly faced with the challenge of delivering healthcare, including mental health care, remotely. Given the rapidly evolving literature, this study performed a narrative review of the use of telehealth for mental health care for pediatric populations during the COVID-19 pandemic. Areas of focus included 1) pediatric primary care settings, 2) special pediatric populations (e.g., eating disorders, autism), 3) access and engagement in telehealth care, and 4) training opportunities available for mental health providers. Themes that emerged across studies included the importance of meeting patients’ needs (e.g., access to technological resources) to optimize success in using telehealth tools and challenges around provider access to evidence-based tools for use during telehealth.
Acceptability and feasibility of using digital technology to train community practitioners to deliver a family-based intervention for adolescents with drug use disorders during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Anja Busse; Wataru Kashino; Sanita Suhartono (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: Addictive Behaviors Reports

By adhering to government preventative messages to stay-at-home and social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic, training practitioners in person in implementing a family-based intervention (i.e., Treatnet Family) is not possible. The present study examined the feasibility and acceptability of using digital technology to remotely deliver Treatnet Family training to practitioners in community counselling services in Indonesia. Fifteen practitioners, from the association of addiction counsellors in Indonesia, participated in the Treatnet Family workshop remotely. The training was delivered by four national Treatnet Family trainers remotely via a digital platform for five days with additional take-home assignments.

The COVID-19 pandemic impact on pediatric surgery residency programs

AUTHOR(S)
Gunadi Gunadi; Naisya Balel; Alvin Santoso Kalim (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: Heliyon
The residency program as a part of the clinical services itself has been influenced by the COVID-19 outbreak. Several reports have been published regarding the impact of COVID-19 on the residency programs; however, all studies were performed in developed countries or did not comprehensively analyze what residents think about the COVID-19 impact on their residency program. We investigated the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the pediatric surgery residency program in our institution as an important part of hospital medical services.
Experiences of nurses caring for perinatal women and newborns during the COVID‐19 pandemic: A descriptive qualitative study

AUTHOR(S)
Hee Sun Kang; Yedong Son; Mi Ja Kim (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: Nursing Open

Nurses are pivotal in caring for patients infected with COVID-19. Little is known about experiences of nurses in maternity care during the pandemic. Therefore, this study aimed to describe nurses’ experiences of caring for perinatal women and newborns during the pandemic. A descriptive qualitative study was conducted. Data were collected from August–November 2020 using focus group and in-depth interviews. A total of 24 nurses working in maternity and newborn care units participated in the study. Content analysis method was used for data analysis.

Reflections from the forgotten frontline: ‘the reality for children and staff in residential care’ during COVID‐19

AUTHOR(S)
Sarah Parry DClinPsy; Tracey Williams; Jeremy Oldfield

Published: May 2021   Journal: Health and Social Care in the Community
Currently, 78,150 children are in care in England, with 11% of the most vulnerable living in 2,460 residential homes due to multitype traumas. These children require safe and secure trauma-informed therapeutic care. However, the children's residential care workforce delivering this vital care is an unrepresented, under-researched and largely unsupported professional group. The workforce undertakes physically and emotionally challenging work in difficult conditions, exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Practitioner wellbeing is directly associated with outcomes for children. Therefore, we sought to understand how experiences within the workforce could improve overall working conditions, and thus outcomes for staff and children.
Have the sleep habits in children of health workers been more affected during the COVID-19 pandemic?

AUTHOR(S)
Ibrahim Hakan Bucak; Habip Almis; Songül Okay Tasar (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: Sleep Medicine

Changes have occurred in children’s sleep habits during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The purpose of this study was to compare the sleep patterns during the COVID-19 pandemic of school age children of health worker parents (Group 1) and non-health worker parents (Group 2). One hundred twenty-two participants were included in Group 1 and 250 in Group 2. The families’ sociodemographic characteristics (education levels and occupations of mothers and fathers, parental shift-working status, monthly family income, number of children in the family, and place of residence), general information for the children taking part (diagnosis of COVID-19 or COVID-19 related isolation, distance education, participation in sporting activities, time spent watching TV, time devoted to reading, time spent on telephones/tablets/computers, and time spent on indoor activities), and the responses given to the Children’s Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSQH)-abbreviated form were all examined.

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