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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1 - 15 of 87
Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the provision of routine childhood immunizations in Ontario, Canada

AUTHOR(S)
Pierre-Philippe Piché-Renaud; Catherine Ji; Daniel S. Farrar (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: Vaccine

The COVID-19 pandemic has a worldwide impact on all health services, including childhood immunizations. In Canada, there is limited data to quantify and characterize this issue. We conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional study by distributing online surveys to physicians across Ontario. The survey included three sections: provider characteristics, impact of COVID-19 on professional practice, and impact of COVID-19 on routine childhood immunization services. Multivariable logistic regression identified factors associated with modification of immunization services.

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on pediatric emergency service

AUTHOR(S)
İlknur Fidancı; Medine Ayşin Taşar; Bahar Akıntuğ (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: The International Journal of Clinical Practice

The aims of this research were to review patients visiting the paediatric emergency department over a 6-month period 1 year before and during the pandemic, to review paediatric emergency department referral ratios and to determine whether there were any significant decreases in mortality and morbidity. All patients from the ages of 0 to 18 years visiting the University of Health Sciences, Ankara Research and Training Hospital, paediatric emergency service from April-October 2019 to April-October 2020 with no missing information in their records were involved in this retrospective cross-sectional study.

Impact that the COVID-19 pandemic on routine childhood vaccinations and challenges ahead: a narrative review
Published: May 2021   Journal: Acta Paediatrica

This study aim to document the decline in vaccination coverage in the first months of 2020 as an indirect effect of the COVID-19 pandemic. A literature review in medical databases was performed. Overall, 143 articles were initially retrieved, out of which 48 were selected and included in the review.

Understanding COVID-19: are children the key?

AUTHOR(S)
Suz Warner; Alex Richter; Zania Stamataki (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: BMJ Paediatrics Open
The devastating impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on global health and economic stability is immeasurable. The situation is dynamic and fast-evolving, with the world facing new variants of concern which may have immune escape potential. With threatened treatment and preventative strategies at stake, and the prospect of reinfection prolonging the pandemic, it is more crucial than ever to understand the pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 infection, which intriguingly disproportionately affects adults and the elderly. Children infected with SARS-CoV-2 remain largely asymptomatic or undergo a transient mild illness. Understanding why children have a milder phenotype and a significant survival advantage may help identify modifiable risk factors in adults.
Effect of Covid-19 quarantine on diabetes care in children

AUTHOR(S)
Miriannette Gayoso; Whei Ying Lim; Madhuri S. Mulekar (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: Clinical Diabetes and Endocrinology

With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic and state-mandated school closures in the spring of 2020, the management of type 1 diabetes in children underwent significant changes. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of stay-at-home orders on glycemic control in children. This study is a retrospective review of 238 children with type 1 and type 2 diabetes who were seen in the Pediatric Endocrinology Clinic at the University of South Alabama. Average Hemoglobin A1c (A1c) levels in the year prior to stay-at home orders (May 2019–April 2020) were compared with A1c values during the quarantine period (May 2020–July 2020) using a paired t-test. It also analyzed the change of A1c level with respect to sex, race, type of diabetes, type of insurance, and mode of insulin administration, using a 2-sample t-test.

Changes in infection-related hospitalizations in children following pandemic restrictions: an interrupted time-series analysis of total population data

AUTHOR(S)
Isobel M. F. Todd; Jessica E. Miller; Stacey L. Rowe

Published: May 2021   Journal: International Journal of Epidemiology
Infectious diseases are a leading cause of hospitalization during childhood. The various mitigation strategies implemented to control the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic could have additional, unintended benefits for limiting the spread of other infectious diseases and their associated burden on the health care system.
Care of pediatric patients with diabetes during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Colleen Buggs-Saxton

Published: May 2021   Journal: Pediatric Clinics of North America
This  article  summarizes  clinical  observations  and  management  strategies  in  pediatric type 1 diabetes (T1D) during the COVID-19 pandemic.  Despite initial fears that children with diabetes would, similar to adults with diabetes, be at risk for severe COVID-19, the majority  of  pediatric  patients  with  a  history  of  type  1  diabetes  (T1D)  who  developed COVID-19 had  mild  disease  or  were  asymptomatic  similar  to  their  peers  without diabetes.  Studies found that pediatric patients with new-onset diabetes often presented with more severe diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in part due to both parental anxiety with seeking emergency medical care and systemic barriers to accessing health care during a pandemic.  The article also summarizes the use of telemedicine to provide ongoing care for  pediatric  patients  with  T1D  during  the  COVID-19  pandemic.    Finally,  the  article highlights  important  lessons  learned  about  management  of  pediatric  diabetes  during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 19 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, COVID-19, diabetes, health care, health services
Changes in childhood vaccination during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic in Japan

AUTHOR(S)
Yuta Aizawa; Tomohiro Katsuta; Hiroshi Sakiyama (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: Vaccine
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has greatly affected daily life. COVID-19 often causes asymptomatic or mild disease in children; however, delayed routine childhood immunization is a concern, as it could increase the risk of vaccine-preventable disease. No study has evaluated the status of childhood vaccinations in Japan during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 7 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, COVID-19, health services, vaccination, vaccination policies | Countries: Japan
Impact of COVID-19 on pediatric Immunocompromised patients

AUTHOR(S)
James A. Connelly; Hey Chong; Adam J. Esbenshade (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: Pediatric Clinics of North America
The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) has caused critical coronavirus disease (COVID-19) most often in the elderly and individuals with co-morbid medical conditions. Although growing evidence supports the importance of an intact innate immune response at the onset of viral infection, mortality caused by dysregulated immune responses, particularly in adults, has shown a spotlight on the delicate balance of a robust, but coordinated and controlled immune activity against infection.  This complex network of infection, immune response, and inflammation with SARS-CoV-2 has created concerns, questions, and challenges for immunocompromised children beyond fear of death from contracting SARS-CoV-2. This review examines how adaptations by health care systems to reduce SARS-CoV-2 transmission and treat the surge of COVID-19 patients impacted immunocompromised pediatric patients.

The Care of Children With Cancer During the COVID-19 Pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Daniel C. Moreira; Gerard C. Millen; Stephen Sands (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: American Society of Clinical Oncology Educational Book
The COVID-19 pandemic has considerably changed health services for children with cancer worldwide by creating barriers throughout the care continuum. Reports available at this time suggest that asymptomatic and mild upper and lower respiratory tract syndromes are the most common presentation of COVID-19 in children with cancer. Nonetheless, severe cases of COVID-19 and deaths secondary to the infection have been reported. In addition to the direct effects of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, children with cancer have suffered from the collateral consequences of the pandemic, including decreased access to diagnosis and cancer-directed therapy. The COVID-19 pandemic has presented unprecedented challenges to safe and effective care of children with cancer, including their enrollment in therapeutic clinical trials.
Telemedicine in the COVID-19 era: taking care of children with obesity and diabetes mellitus

AUTHOR(S)
Giuseppina Rosaria Umano; Anna Di Sessa; Stefano Guarino (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: World Journal of Diabetes
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection was declared a pandemic in January 2020. Since then, several measures to limit virus transmission have been imposed; among them, home confinement has been the most severe, with drastic changes in the daily routines of the general population. The “stay at home” rule has impaired healthcare service access, and patients with chronic conditions were the most exposed to the negative effects of this limitation. There is strong evidence of the worsening of obesity and diabetes mellitus in children during this period. To overcome these issues, healthcare providers have changed their clinical practice to ensure follow-up visits and medical consultation though the use of telemedicine. Telemedicine, including telephone calls, videocalls, data platforms of shared telemedicine data platforms mitigated the negative effect of pandemic restrictions. Published evidence has documented good metabolic control and weight management outcomes in centers that performed extensive telemedicine services last year during the pandemic. This review discusses studies that investigated the use of telemedicine tools for the management of pediatric obesity and diabetes.
Quality of life and occupational performance of children with cancer in the era of the COVID-19 pandemic in terms of rehabilitation

AUTHOR(S)
Gözde Önal; Güleser Güney; Meral Huri

Published: May 2021   Journal: Quality of Life Research
This study was designed to determine the changes in the quality of life (QOL) and occupational performance of children with cancer and to examine their rehabilitation needs during the pandemic period in Turkey. 60 children with cancer and their families participated in the study. The first and second assessments were carried out in April and September 2020, respectively. The pediatric quality of life inventory parent proxy-report was used to evaluate the QOL, and the Canadian occupational performance measurement was used to evaluate children’s occupational performance and satisfaction. A qualitative interview was planned to determine the impact of the pandemic on children with cancer alongside their families and therefore determining the rehabilitation needs of the children.
Experiences of nurses caring for perinatal women and newborns during the COVID‐19 pandemic: A descriptive qualitative study

AUTHOR(S)
Hee Sun Kang; Yedong Son; Mi Ja Kim (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: Nursing Open

Nurses are pivotal in caring for patients infected with COVID-19. Little is known about experiences of nurses in maternity care during the pandemic. Therefore, this study aimed to describe nurses’ experiences of caring for perinatal women and newborns during the pandemic. A descriptive qualitative study was conducted. Data were collected from August–November 2020 using focus group and in-depth interviews. A total of 24 nurses working in maternity and newborn care units participated in the study. Content analysis method was used for data analysis.

Reflections from the forgotten frontline: ‘the reality for children and staff in residential care’ during COVID‐19

AUTHOR(S)
Sarah Parry DClinPsy; Tracey Williams; Jeremy Oldfield

Published: May 2021   Journal: Health and Social Care in the Community
Currently, 78,150 children are in care in England, with 11% of the most vulnerable living in 2,460 residential homes due to multitype traumas. These children require safe and secure trauma-informed therapeutic care. However, the children's residential care workforce delivering this vital care is an unrepresented, under-researched and largely unsupported professional group. The workforce undertakes physically and emotionally challenging work in difficult conditions, exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Practitioner wellbeing is directly associated with outcomes for children. Therefore, we sought to understand how experiences within the workforce could improve overall working conditions, and thus outcomes for staff and children.
What are the risk factors for admission to the pediatric intensive unit among pediatric patients with COVID-19?

AUTHOR(S)
Susanna Esposito; Fabio Caramelli; Nicola Principi

Published: May 2021   Journal: Italian Journal of Pediatrics
Although with exceptions, evidence seems to indicate that children have lower susceptibility than adults to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. When infected, children generally remain asymptomatic or develop mild disease. A small number of pediatric cases required admission to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU), respiratory support with a mechanical ventilation and additional life-saving interventions. Even if rarely, death can occur. Aim of this manuscript is to highlight the risk factors associated with severe outcome among pediatric patients with COVID-19.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.