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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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16 - 30 of 53
Quality of life changes during the COVID-19 pandemic for caregivers of children with ADHD and/or ASD

AUTHOR(S)
Keith W. Pecor; Georgia Barbyannis; Max Yang (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research Public Health
The COVID-19 pandemic has presented many challenges to caregivers of children. Families with children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and/or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are an understudied but potentially vulnerable population to changes during the outbreak. As such, the aim of this study was to contrast quality of life for caregivers of children with ADHD and/or ASD, before and during the pandemic, compared to caregivers of neurotypical (NT) children.
Education, healthy ageing and vaccine literacy

AUTHOR(S)
J.-P. Michel; J. Goldberg

Published: April 2021   Journal: The journal of nutrition, health & aging
The Covid pandemic is a timely opportunity to try to broaden our understanding of the links between education and health literacy and explore the vaccine-decision process with a view to identifying interventions that will positively influence vaccine uptake.
Supporting parents as essential care partners in neonatal units during the SARS‐CoV‐2 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Nicole R. van Veenendaal; Aniko Deierl; Fabiana Bacchini (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Acta Paediatrica

This study aims to review the evidence on safety of maintaining family integrated care practices and the effects of restricting parental participation in neonatal care during the SARS‐CoV‐2 pandemic. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINAHL databases were searched from inception to the 14th of October 2020. Records were included if they reported scientific, empirical research (qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods) on the effects of restricting or promoting family integrated care practices for parents of hospitalized neonates during the SARS‐CoV‐2 pandemic. Two authors independently screened abstracts, appraised study quality and extracted study and outcome data.

Using mHealth Apps in health education of schoolchildren with chronic disease during COVID-19 pandemic era

AUTHOR(S)
Abdulaziz Mansoor Al Raimi; Chan Mei Chong; Li Yoong Tang (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Emerging Technologies During the Era of COVID-19 Pandemic
COVID-19 significantly affects all our normal life daily especially health care services, so it’s important to find and implement innovative approaches to help individuals at a high risk to resume normal life daily. The usage of digital technologies and social networking has grown rapidly over the last decades, and these technologies are increasingly being incorporated into health education. In this study, we discussed the importance of using the mHealth technology for schoolchildren with chronic disease during the COVID-19 era, and we have used Social Learning Theory and Technology Acceptance Model from the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) as the theoretical framework for the present study. The previous study concluded the mobile device being studied is a reliable way of helping schoolchildren increase awareness their disease, but further research efforts should assess the impact of application usage on disease outcomes over a more extended follow-up period as compared to traditional care.
SARS-CoV-2 prevalence associated to low socioeconomic status and overcrowding in an LMIC megacity: a population-based seroepidemiological survey in Lima, Peru

AUTHOR(S)
Mary F. Reyes-Vega; M.Gabriela Soto-Cabezas; Fany Cardenas (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: EClinicalMedicine
Worldwide, Peru has one of the highest infection fatality rates of COVID-19, and its capital city, Lima, accumulates roughly 50% of diagnosed cases. Despite surveillance efforts to assess the extent of the pandemic, reported cases and deaths only capture a fraction of its impact due to COVID-19′s broad clinical spectrum. This study aimed to estimate the seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 in Lima, stratified by age, sex, region, socioeconomic status (SES), overcrowding, and symptoms.
COVID-19 pandemic: a unique opportunity to ‘build back fairer’ and reduce health inequities in the Eastern Mediterranean Region

AUTHOR(S)
Ahmed Al-Mandhari; Michael Marmot; Abdul Ghaffar (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal
Evidence has shown that some of the major causes of health inequities arise from the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work and age, in addition to a wider set of forces and systems shaping individuals’ and societies’ health and well-being. Such conditions are known as the ‘social determinants of health’. However, efforts to address these determinants have remained challenging and unsatisfactory in many parts of the world, including in the Eastern Mediterranean Region. Policies to contain the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic have further exposed and amplified the existing and even created new dimensions in social and health inequities, as we elaborate further below. Meanwhile, the pandemic offers a unique opportunity to tackle inequities and build back fairer.
Cite this research | Vol.: 27 | Issue: 3 | No. of pages: 217-219 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, COVID-19 response, economic and social conditions, health care, multi-country, social inequality
‘Do I, don’t I?’ a qualitative study addressing parental perceptions about seeking healthcare during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Gabriella Watson; Lucy Pickard; Bhanu Williams (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Archives of disease in childhood
Paediatric emergency departments have seen reduced attendance during the COVID-19 pandemic. Late paediatric presentations may lead to severe illness and even death. Maintaining provision of healthcare through a pandemic is essential. This qualitative study aims to identify changing care-seeking behaviours in child health during the pandemic and ascertain parental views around barriers to care.
‘Private family arrangements’ for children in Ireland: the informal grey space in-between state care and the family home

AUTHOR(S)
Kenneth Burns; Conor O’Mahony; Rebekah Brennan

Published: February 2021   Journal: The British Journal of Social Work
The literature on alternative care focuses overwhelmingly on formal, court-ordered placements; voluntary care placements are discussed less frequently. Least attention of all has been given to informal kinship care placements, where a child is cared for by relatives but is not formally in the legal care of state authorities. In Ireland, these placements, when facilitated by state authorities in lieu of a care order or voluntary care agreement, are known by professionals as ‘private family arrangements’. This article explores evidence which shows that the use of such arrangements is motivated partly by a concern for subsidiarity, and partly by necessity: they provide a source of placements in cases where regulatory requirements and a lack of resources would otherwise make the placement challenging or impossible.
Children and telehealth in mental healthcare: what we have learned from COVID‐19 and 40,000+ sessions

AUTHOR(S)
Gabriel Hoffnung; Esther Feigenbaum; Ayelet Schechter (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Psychiatric Research and Clinical Practice

Of the many impacts of COVID‐19 on contemporary healthcare is the rapid and overwhelming shift to remote telehealth (TH) service. The precise effect of TH on treatment is yet unknown, and the possible child/adult differences are an essential point of clarification for the utility of TH services and efforts to improve upon them.The current study considers data reflecting pre‐, during‐, and post‐COVID‐19 lockdown over the first six months of 2020.

The different manifestations of COVID-19 in adults and children: a cohort study in an intensive care unit

AUTHOR(S)
Mònica Girona-Alarcon; Sara Bobillo-Perez; Anna Sole-Ribalta (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: BMC Infectious Diseases
The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has collapsed health systems worldwide. In adults, the virus causes severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), while in children the disease seems to be milder, although a severe multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C) has been described. The aim was to describe and compare the characteristics of the severe COVID-19 disease in adults and children.
Research consent rates before and during a COVID-19 one-visitor policy in a children’s hospital

AUTHOR(S)
Sara L. Van Driest; Sarita M. Madell; Kimberly Crum (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Pediatric Research
The COVID-19 pandemic has already had widespread effects on healthcare and health-related research worldwide. Early phase responses to the pandemic included restriction of clinical care and research to essential, time-sensitive and COVID-related activities in many institutions. With the re-introduction of clinical services, a number of strategies were imposed to minimize viral transmission to patients and healthcare personnel, such as strict limits on visitors/caregivers in pediatric inpatient facilities, which may have ethical implications on family-centered care. This study investigates consent rates for a clinical research study before and after implementation of a one-visitor policy at our children’s hospital.
Caring under COVID-19: how the pandemic is – and is not – changing unpaid care and domestic work responsibilities in the United States

AUTHOR(S)
Brian Heilman; María Rosario Castro Bernardini; Kimberly Pfeifer

Published: December 2020

This report provides six new insights on the unfolding crisis of care, along with PL+US highlighting the need for paid leave, policy changes that are intersectional and that account for and remedy existing inequalities, and better inclusion in decision-making of those individuals with a clear view of inequalities. This report is the first in a series of similar polls in the #HowICare Project which will be published by Oxfam International in four other countries: UK, Canada, Philippines, and Kenya.

Finding our power together: working with indigenous youth and children during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Nicole Ineese-Nash

Published: December 2020   Journal: Child & Youth Services
Indigenous communities continue to be under-resourced, under-funded, and overly managed and policed (Greenwood et al., 2012), which has only been exacerbated by COVID-19. Our ability to choose our own path has been gated, leaving only a singular paved road toward the center; toward assimilation. For many, this is not a choice at all.
The psychiatric sequelae of the COVID‐19 pandemic in adolescents, adults, and health care workers
Published: December 2020   Journal: Depression and Anxiety
The COVID‐19 pandemic is the most serious global public health crisis since the 1918 influenza pandemic. This study is the first to assess its mental health impact across the lifespan in the United States in adolescents, adults, and health care workers.
COVID-19 and the case for universal health coverage: accountability – the beating heart of UHC

AUTHOR(S)
Tara Brace-John

Institution: Save the Children
Published: December 2020

The connection between civic space, civil society engagement and access to healthcare has been sharply highlighted during the COVID-19 pandemic. Civil society around the world has mobilised to bring attention to the needs of the most vulnerable people, and demonstrated the invaluable role it plays in addressing inequities and championing health for all. It is this commitment and zeal that will make UHC possible. This study sets out why accountability is vital to achieving universal health coverage. It also makes the case for protecting and expanding civic space as a way of encouraging civic engagement, resulting in accountability. We put forward recommendations to governments and global health actors to improve meaningful civil society inclusion in health governance.


Cite this research | No. of pages: 12 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: COVID-19 response, health care, pandemic | Publisher: Save the Children
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.