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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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16 - 30 of 74
Fear, changes in routine and dental care for children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder in the COVID-19 pandemic: a survey with Brazilian parents

AUTHOR(S)
Bárbara Azevedo Machado; Juliana Silva Moro; Carla Massignam (et al.)

Published: December 2021   Journal: Special Care In Dentistry

This study aimed to report the perception of parents of children/adolescents with autism regarding the parents’ fear of the pandemic by COVID-19. Also, to report children's fear about the use of individual protective equipment (IPE) in dental appointments, and the impact on the daily routine during the pandemic. A cross-sectional study through an open online survey was addressed to parents of children/adolescents autistic, aged between 3 and 18 years. The questionnaire had questions regarding the parents’ fear of the COVID-19 pandemic, the parents’ perception about the children/adolescents’ fear of the use of IPEs at dental care, and the impact of the daily routine during the pandemic and social impact after the pandemic. Parents' reports on the degree of ASD (mild, moderate, and severe) of the child/adolescent. A total of 1001 responses were obtained. 50.35% of parents had high fear of the pandemic by COVID-19, 59.34% believe that children/teenagers will be afraid of the dentist's IPE and 61.64% responded that the COVID-19 pandemic had a high impact on the daily routine of children/adolescents with ASD.

From “nobody's clapping for us” to “bad moms”: COVID-19 and the circle of childcare in Canada

AUTHOR(S)
Julia Smith

Published: October 2021   Journal: Gender, Work & Organization
The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the importance of childcare to national economies in general and women's economic participation in particular, spurring renewed interest in childcare policy in many countries that have implemented lockdowns. This paper adopts a circle of care framework to analyzes how COVID-19 has affected paid childcare, unpaid childcare and other paid work, and the relationship between these sectors. Analysis is grounded in the lived experiences of parents and childcare educators, documented through 16 semi-structured interviews during the initial lockdown (March–June 2020) in British Columbia, Canada. Experiences from educators suggest their safety was not prioritized, and that their contributions were undervalued and went unrecognized. Mothers, who provided the majority of unpaid care, not only lost income due to care demands, but struggled to access necessities, with some reporting increased personal insecurity. Those attempting to work from home also experienced feelings of guilt and distress as they tried to manage the triple burden. Similarities of experiences across the circle of care suggest the COVID-19 childcare policy response in BC Canada downloaded care responsibilities on to women without corresponding recognition or support, causing women to absorb the costs of care work, with potential long-term negative effects on women's careers and well-being, as well as on the resilience of the circle of care.
Acute care visits for eating disorders among children and adolescents after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Alène Toulany; Paul Kurdy; Astrid Guttmann (et al.)

Published: October 2021   Journal: Journal of Adolescent Health

Anecdotal reports suggest a significant increase in acute presentations of eating disorders among children and adolescents. This study aimed to compare the rates of emergency department visits and hospitalizations for pediatric eating disorders before and during the first 10 months of the COVID-19 pandemic. Using linked health administrative databases, it conducted a population-based repeated cross-sectional study of emergency department visits and hospitalizations for eating disorders among all children and adolescents aged 3–17 years, residing in Ontario, Canada.

Global research priorities for COVID-19 in maternal, reproductive and child health: Results of an international survey

AUTHOR(S)
Melanie Etti; Jackeline Alger; Sofía P. Salas (et al.)

Published: September 2021   Journal: Plos One

The World Health Organization’s “Coordinated Global Research Roadmap: 2019 Novel Coronavirus” outlined the need for research that focuses on the impact of COVID-19 on pregnant women and children. More than one year after the first reported case significant knowledge gaps remain, highlighting the need for a coordinated approach. To address this need, the Maternal, Newborn and Child Health Working Group (MNCH WG) of the COVID-19 Clinical Research Coalition conducted an international survey to identify global research priorities for COVID-19 in maternal, reproductive and child health. This project was undertaken using a modified Delphi method. An electronic questionnaire was disseminated to clinicians and researchers in three different languages (English, French and Spanish) via MNCH WG affiliated networks. Respondents were asked to select the five most urgent research priorities among a list of 17 identified by the MNCH

The effect of online solution-focused brief therapy on parents with high level of anxiety in the COVID 19 pandemic: a randomized controlled study

AUTHOR(S)
Mürşide Zengin; Ceyda Başoğul; Emriye Hilal Yayan

Published: September 2021   Journal: International Journal of Clinical Practice is

The aim of this study was to determine the anxiety levels of parents with children aged 3-6 years because of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and to examine the effects of Solution-Focused Support Program (SFSP) applied to parents with a high level of anxiety. The study was conducted as a parallel-group, randomised controlled design. The sample of the study consisted of 77 parents who were randomly assigned to the experimental and control groups (control group n = 40; intervention group n = 37). One session of online SFSP was applied to the intervention group each week and 4 sessions were applied in total. No intervention was applied to the control group. 

COVID-19 and UK family carers: policy implications

AUTHOR(S)
Juliana Onwumere; Cathy Creswell; Gill Livingston (et al.)

Published: September 2021   Journal: The Lancet Psychiatry

Informal (unpaid) carers are an integral part of all societies and the health and social care systems in the UK depend on them. Despite the valuable contributions and key worker status of informal carers, their lived experiences, wellbeing, and needs have been neglected during the COVID-19 pandemic. This Health Policy brings together a broad range of clinicians, researchers, and people with lived experience as informal carers to share their thoughts on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on UK carers, many of whom have felt abandoned as services closed. It focuses on the carers of children and young people and adults and older adults with mental health diagnoses, and carers of people with intellectual disability or neurodevelopmental conditions across different care settings over the lifespan. It provides policy recommendations with the aim of improving outcomes for all carers.



A cross-sectional survey exploring the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the cancer care of adolescents and young adults

AUTHOR(S)
Kaitlyn Howden; Camille Glidden; Razvan G. Romanescu (et al.)

Published: August 2021   Journal: Current Oncology
This study aimed to describe the negative and positive impacts of changes in cancer care delivery due to COVID-19 pandemic for adolescents and young adults (AYAs) in Canada, as well as the correlates of negative impact and their perspectives on optimization of cancer care. It conducted an online, self-administered survey of AYAs with cancer living in Canada between January and February 2021. Multiple logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with a negative impact on cancer care. Of the 805 participants, 173 (21.5%) experienced a negative impact on their cancer care including delays in diagnostic tests (11.9%), cancer treatment (11.4%), and appointments (11.1%). A prior diagnosis of mental or chronic physical health condition, an annual income of <20,000 CAD, ongoing cancer treatment, and province of residence were independently associated with a negative cancer care impact (p-value < 0.05). The majority (n = 767, 95.2%) stated a positive impact of the changes to cancer care delivery, including the implementation of virtual healthcare visits (n = 601, 74.6%). Pandemic-related changes in cancer care delivery have unfavorably and favorably influenced AYAs with cancer. Interventions to support AYAs who are more vulnerable to the adverse effects of the pandemic, and the thoughtful integration of virtual care into cancer care delivery models is essential.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 28 | Issue: 4 | No. of pages: 13 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: adolescent health, COVID-19 response, health care, health services, lockdown, social distance | Countries: Canada
Economic Crisis and Child Well-being in the West and Central Africa Region
The COVID-19 pandemic that swept over the world from early 2020 has triggered both health and economic shocks of unprecedented proportions in recent memory. Some estimates suggest that the consequences of these shocks will likely erase most of the progress made in global development over the past two decades. Many countries now risk falling further behind the attainment of national and international development goals, including the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals. Children are particularly vulnerable to the effects of these shocks due to their persistent higher levels of vulnerability, and the reality that school closures and other COVID-19 containment measures can be more damaging to children. 

This report examines the effect of previous economic crises on children’s well-being in UNICEF’s West and Central Africa Region (WCAR) and makes projections regarding the potential impacts of COVID-19-induced economic crises on priority indicators for the region. 
COVID-19 in children with cancer and continuation of cancer-directed therapy during the infection

AUTHOR(S)
Badira Cheriyalinkal Parambil; Nirmalya Roy Moulik; Chetan Dhamne (et al.)

Published: August 2021   Journal: Indian Journal of Pediatrics

This study aims to report the experience with COVID-19 in children with cancer at the largest tertiary-cancer care and referral center in India. This study is a single tertiary center experience on COVID-19 in children with cancer and continuation of cancer-directed therapy in them. Children ≤ 15 y on active cancer treatment detected with COVID-19 until September 15th, 2020 were prospectively followed up in the study. Patients were managed in accordance with well-laid guidelines. Treatment was continued for children with COVID-19 who were clinically stable and on intensive treatment for various childhood cancers.

Ethical responsibilities of European children’s teams facing the resurgent COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Anna Zanin; Enrico Furlan; Marek Migdal (et al.)

Published: July 2021   Journal: European Journal of Pediatrics
The COrona VIrus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is posing an unprecedented challenge to healthcare systems around the globe. Europe has been struggling for 1 year now, and despite some encouraging progress (above all, the beginning of vaccination), the second wave is ongoing. Even though children are less affected than adults, the COVID-19 pandemic—and in particular the measures to counter it—is having a considerable impact on the paediatric healthcare setting. It is, therefore, the duty of paediatric teams in Europe to prepare for the challenges ahead. We wish to contribute to this necessary preparedness in two ways: firstly, by assessing the direct and indirect impact of the pandemic on children and on the paediatric setting; secondly, and more importantly, by identifying the various responsibilities of paediatric healthcare professionals, in light of established ethical principles.
Healthcare professionals’ experiences of the barriers and facilitators to paediatric pain management in the community at end-of-life: a qualitative interview study

AUTHOR(S)
Katie Greenfield; Bernie Carter; Emily Harrop (et al.)

Published: July 2021   Journal: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management

Inadequate pain management in community paediatric palliative care is common. Evidence to inform improved pain management in this population is limited. To explore the barriers and facilitators to paediatric community-based pain management for infants, children and young people at end-of-life as perceived by healthcare professionals.

Global changes in maternity care provision during the COVID-19 pandemic: a systematic review and meta-analysis

AUTHOR(S)
Rosemary Townsend; Barbara Chmielewska; Imogen Barratt (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: EClinicalMedicine
The COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound impact on healthcare systems globally, with a worrying increase in adverse maternal and foetal outcomes. This study aimed to assess the changes in maternity healthcare provision and healthcare-seeking by pregnant women during the COVID-19 pandemic. It performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies of the effects of the pandemic on provision of, access to and attendance at maternity services.
Resilience and vulnerability of maternity services in Zimbabwe: a comparative analysis of the effect of Covid-19 and lockdown control measures on maternal and perinatal outcomes, a single-centre cross-sectional study at Mpilo Central Hospital

AUTHOR(S)
Clare Shakespeare; Handsome Dube; Sikhangezile Moyo (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth

On the 27th of March 2020 the Zimbabwean government declared the Covid-19 pandemic a ‘national disaster’. Travel restrictions and emergency regulations have had significant impacts on maternity services, including resource stock-outs, and closure of antenatal clinics during the lockdown period. Estimates of the indirect impact of Covid-19 on maternal and perinatal mortality was expected it to be considerable, but little data was yet available. This study aimed to examine the impact of Covid-19 and lockdown control measures on non-Covid outcomes in a government tertiary level maternity unit in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, by comparing maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality before, and after the lockdown was implemented.

Refugees and migrants in times of COVID-19: mapping trends of public health and migration policies and practices
Institution: World Health Organisation
Published: June 2021
Refugees and migrants have been disproportionately affected by both the direct effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and the restrictive migration measures put in place, which, in turn, have hampered coordinated and consistent public health responses. This report maps how the needs of refugee and migrant have been addressed in COVID-19 responses across countries and how these have varied considerably from inclusive policies to discriminatory practices. Many countries ensured access to health care for refugees and migrants regardless of migration status, and several countries also suspended forced returns and prioritized alternatives to immigration detention. An integrated approach to migration and public health policies covering protection-sensitive access to territories, a flexible approach to migration status and non-discriminatory access to health care is suggested as a policy consideration to uphold international conventions protecting the right to health without discrimination for refugees and migrants.
Parent training intervention for autism symptoms, functional emotional development, and parental stress in children with autism disorder: a randomized clinical trial

AUTHOR(S)
Afsaneh Akhani; Mahmood Dehghani; Banafsheh Gharraee (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: Asian Journal of Psychiatry

Today, early interventions to treat autistic children through parent training interventions is of outmost importance. Interventions are focused on developmental or behavioral approaches and are mostly individual or group ones. In the present study, both proposed approaches in the form of structured individual and group parent training sessions among Iranian families are investigated. This study was a randomized clinical trial which was performed in 2019–2020 in Tehran.

16 - 30 of 74

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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Each quarterly thematic digest features the latest evidence drawn from the Children and COVID-19 Research Library on a particular topic of interest.
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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.