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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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31 - 45 of 74
Improving clinical paediatric research and learning from COVID-19: recommendations by the Conect4Children expert advice group

AUTHOR(S)
Neena Modi; Saskia N. de Wildt (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: Pediatric Research

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a devastating impact on multiple aspects of healthcare, but has also triggered new ways of working, stimulated novel approaches in clinical research and reinforced the value of previous innovations. Conect4children (c4c, www.conect4children.org) is a large collaborative European network to facilitate the development of new medicines for paediatric populations, and is made up of 35 academic and 10 industry partners from 20 European countries, more than 50 third parties, and around 500 affiliated partners. This study summarises aspects of clinical research in paediatrics stimulated and reinforced by COVID-19 that the Conect4children group recommends regulators, sponsors, and investigators retain for the future, to enhance the efficiency, reduce the cost and burden of medicines and non-interventional studies, and deliver research-equity.

Care of pediatric patients with diabetes during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Colleen Buggs-Saxton

Published: May 2021   Journal: Pediatric Clinics of North America
This  article  summarizes  clinical  observations  and  management  strategies  in  pediatric type 1 diabetes (T1D) during the COVID-19 pandemic.  Despite initial fears that children with diabetes would, similar to adults with diabetes, be at risk for severe COVID-19, the majority  of  pediatric  patients  with  a  history  of  type  1  diabetes  (T1D)  who  developed COVID-19 had  mild  disease  or  were  asymptomatic  similar  to  their  peers  without diabetes.  Studies found that pediatric patients with new-onset diabetes often presented with more severe diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in part due to both parental anxiety with seeking emergency medical care and systemic barriers to accessing health care during a pandemic.  The article also summarizes the use of telemedicine to provide ongoing care for  pediatric  patients  with  T1D  during  the  COVID-19  pandemic.    Finally,  the  article highlights  important  lessons  learned  about  management  of  pediatric  diabetes  during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 19 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, COVID-19, diabetes, health care, health services
Impact of COVID-19 on pediatric Immunocompromised patients

AUTHOR(S)
James A. Connelly; Hey Chong; Adam J. Esbenshade (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: Pediatric Clinics of North America
The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) has caused critical coronavirus disease (COVID-19) most often in the elderly and individuals with co-morbid medical conditions. Although growing evidence supports the importance of an intact innate immune response at the onset of viral infection, mortality caused by dysregulated immune responses, particularly in adults, has shown a spotlight on the delicate balance of a robust, but coordinated and controlled immune activity against infection.  This complex network of infection, immune response, and inflammation with SARS-CoV-2 has created concerns, questions, and challenges for immunocompromised children beyond fear of death from contracting SARS-CoV-2. This review examines how adaptations by health care systems to reduce SARS-CoV-2 transmission and treat the surge of COVID-19 patients impacted immunocompromised pediatric patients.

Challenges in access and satisfaction with reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health services in Nigeria during the COVID-19 pandemic: A cross-sectional survey

AUTHOR(S)
Mobolanle Balogun; Aduragbemi Banke-Thomas; Adekemi Sekoni (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: Plos One
The presence of COVID-19 has led to the disruption of health systems globally, including essential reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health (RMNCH) services. This study aimed to assess the challenges faced by women who used RMNCH services in Nigeria’s epicentre, their satisfaction with care received during the COVID-19 pandemic and the factors associated with their satisfaction.
The state of neonatal and pediatric interfacility transport during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Michael H. Stroud; Franscesca F. Miquel-Verges; Ranna A. Rozenfeld (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: Air Medical Journal
The COVID-19 pandemic has altered the provision of healthcare, including interfacility transport of critically ill neonatal and pediatrics patients. Transport medicine faces unique challenges in the care of persons infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus. In particular, the multitude of providers, confined spaces for prolonged time periods, varying modes (ground, rotor wing, fixed wing) of transport, and need for frequent aerosol-generating procedures place transport personnel at high risk. This study describes the clinical practices, personal protective equipment, and potential exposure risks of a large cohort of neonatal and pediatric interfacility transport teams.
Trends in pediatric primary care visits during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Kelsey Schweiberger; Sadiq Y. Patel; Ateev Mehrotra (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: Academic Pediatrics

Months after the declaration of the COVID-19 national emergency, visits among children remained suppressed for unclear reasons, which we sought to understand by examining child visit rates. Using de-identified claims data for children <18 years old from OptumLabs® Data Warehouse, a large commercial claims database, we compared monthly primary care visit and vaccination rates from January-October 2020 to January-October 2018 and 2019. Visit rates were analyzed by visit reason and by the month after (e.g., month +1) the COVID-19 public health emergency declaration using a series of child-level Poisson regression models.

Quality of life changes during the COVID-19 pandemic for caregivers of children with ADHD and/or ASD

AUTHOR(S)
Keith W. Pecor; Georgia Barbyannis; Max Yang (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research Public Health
The COVID-19 pandemic has presented many challenges to caregivers of children. Families with children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and/or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are an understudied but potentially vulnerable population to changes during the outbreak. As such, the aim of this study was to contrast quality of life for caregivers of children with ADHD and/or ASD, before and during the pandemic, compared to caregivers of neurotypical (NT) children.
Education, healthy ageing and vaccine literacy

AUTHOR(S)
J.-P. Michel; J. Goldberg

Published: April 2021   Journal: The journal of nutrition, health & aging
The Covid pandemic is a timely opportunity to try to broaden our understanding of the links between education and health literacy and explore the vaccine-decision process with a view to identifying interventions that will positively influence vaccine uptake.
Supporting parents as essential care partners in neonatal units during the SARS‐CoV‐2 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Nicole R. van Veenendaal; Aniko Deierl; Fabiana Bacchini (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Acta Paediatrica

This study aims to review the evidence on safety of maintaining family integrated care practices and the effects of restricting parental participation in neonatal care during the SARS‐CoV‐2 pandemic. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINAHL databases were searched from inception to the 14th of October 2020. Records were included if they reported scientific, empirical research (qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods) on the effects of restricting or promoting family integrated care practices for parents of hospitalized neonates during the SARS‐CoV‐2 pandemic. Two authors independently screened abstracts, appraised study quality and extracted study and outcome data.

Using mHealth Apps in health education of schoolchildren with chronic disease during COVID-19 pandemic era

AUTHOR(S)
Abdulaziz Mansoor Al Raimi; Chan Mei Chong; Li Yoong Tang (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Emerging Technologies During the Era of COVID-19 Pandemic
COVID-19 significantly affects all our normal life daily especially health care services, so it’s important to find and implement innovative approaches to help individuals at a high risk to resume normal life daily. The usage of digital technologies and social networking has grown rapidly over the last decades, and these technologies are increasingly being incorporated into health education. In this study, we discussed the importance of using the mHealth technology for schoolchildren with chronic disease during the COVID-19 era, and we have used Social Learning Theory and Technology Acceptance Model from the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) as the theoretical framework for the present study. The previous study concluded the mobile device being studied is a reliable way of helping schoolchildren increase awareness their disease, but further research efforts should assess the impact of application usage on disease outcomes over a more extended follow-up period as compared to traditional care.
SARS-CoV-2 prevalence associated to low socioeconomic status and overcrowding in an LMIC megacity: a population-based seroepidemiological survey in Lima, Peru

AUTHOR(S)
Mary F. Reyes-Vega; M.Gabriela Soto-Cabezas; Fany Cardenas (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: EClinicalMedicine
Worldwide, Peru has one of the highest infection fatality rates of COVID-19, and its capital city, Lima, accumulates roughly 50% of diagnosed cases. Despite surveillance efforts to assess the extent of the pandemic, reported cases and deaths only capture a fraction of its impact due to COVID-19′s broad clinical spectrum. This study aimed to estimate the seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 in Lima, stratified by age, sex, region, socioeconomic status (SES), overcrowding, and symptoms.
COVID-19 pandemic: a unique opportunity to ‘build back fairer’ and reduce health inequities in the Eastern Mediterranean Region

AUTHOR(S)
Ahmed Al-Mandhari; Michael Marmot; Abdul Ghaffar (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal
Evidence has shown that some of the major causes of health inequities arise from the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work and age, in addition to a wider set of forces and systems shaping individuals’ and societies’ health and well-being. Such conditions are known as the ‘social determinants of health’. However, efforts to address these determinants have remained challenging and unsatisfactory in many parts of the world, including in the Eastern Mediterranean Region. Policies to contain the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic have further exposed and amplified the existing and even created new dimensions in social and health inequities, as we elaborate further below. Meanwhile, the pandemic offers a unique opportunity to tackle inequities and build back fairer.
Cite this research | Vol.: 27 | Issue: 3 | No. of pages: 217-219 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, COVID-19 response, economic and social conditions, health care, multi-country, social inequality
‘Do I, don’t I?’ a qualitative study addressing parental perceptions about seeking healthcare during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Gabriella Watson; Lucy Pickard; Bhanu Williams (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Archives of disease in childhood
Paediatric emergency departments have seen reduced attendance during the COVID-19 pandemic. Late paediatric presentations may lead to severe illness and even death. Maintaining provision of healthcare through a pandemic is essential. This qualitative study aims to identify changing care-seeking behaviours in child health during the pandemic and ascertain parental views around barriers to care.
‘Private family arrangements’ for children in Ireland: the informal grey space in-between state care and the family home

AUTHOR(S)
Kenneth Burns; Conor O’Mahony; Rebekah Brennan

Published: February 2021   Journal: The British Journal of Social Work
The literature on alternative care focuses overwhelmingly on formal, court-ordered placements; voluntary care placements are discussed less frequently. Least attention of all has been given to informal kinship care placements, where a child is cared for by relatives but is not formally in the legal care of state authorities. In Ireland, these placements, when facilitated by state authorities in lieu of a care order or voluntary care agreement, are known by professionals as ‘private family arrangements’. This article explores evidence which shows that the use of such arrangements is motivated partly by a concern for subsidiarity, and partly by necessity: they provide a source of placements in cases where regulatory requirements and a lack of resources would otherwise make the placement challenging or impossible.
Children and telehealth in mental healthcare: what we have learned from COVID‐19 and 40,000+ sessions

AUTHOR(S)
Gabriel Hoffnung; Esther Feigenbaum; Ayelet Schechter (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Psychiatric Research and Clinical Practice

Of the many impacts of COVID‐19 on contemporary healthcare is the rapid and overwhelming shift to remote telehealth (TH) service. The precise effect of TH on treatment is yet unknown, and the possible child/adult differences are an essential point of clarification for the utility of TH services and efforts to improve upon them.The current study considers data reflecting pre‐, during‐, and post‐COVID‐19 lockdown over the first six months of 2020.

31 - 45 of 74

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.