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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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16 - 30 of 42
Management of children and adolescents having type 1 diabetes during COVID-19 pandemic in India: challenges and solutions

AUTHOR(S)
Pratap Jethwani; B. Saboo; L. Jethwani (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) requires a holistic approach and continuous care. The current COVID-19 pandemic has made the health care professionals realise its challenges even more ardently than in the normal times. In a country like India with its huge population burden and a significant number of people having T1D, the risk of COVID-19 in people having T1DM is considerably high. In this article, practical experiences of problems faced by children and adolescents having T1DM during the past 2 months of lockdown are shared.

Establishment of a pediatric COVID-19 biorepository: unique considerations and opportunities for studying the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on children
Published: September 2020   Journal: BMC Medical Research Methodology
COVID-19, the disease caused by the highly infectious and transmissible coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, has quickly become a morbid global pandemic. Although the impact of SARS-CoV-2 infection in children is less clinically apparent, collecting high-quality biospecimens from infants, children, and adolescents in a standardized manner during the COVID-19 pandemic is essential to establish a biologic understanding of the disease in the pediatric population. This biorepository enables pediatric centers world-wide to collect samples uniformly to drive forward our understanding of COVID-19 by addressing specific pediatric and neonatal COVID-19-related questions.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 11 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, data collection, health services, COVID-19
How should our testing behaviour change with time in children in current COVID‐19 pandemic?

AUTHOR(S)
Yin Zhang; Jilei Lin; Hongmei Xu (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: European Journal of Clinical Investigation

More paediatric‐confirmed cases have been reported with the global pandemic of COVID‐19. This study aims to summarize the key points and supply suggestions on screening paediatric COVID‐19 patients more appropriately. We retrospectively included paediatric patients who have accepted SARS‐CoV‐2 RT‐PCR testing in Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University (30 January 2020 to 13 February 2020) and compared them with paediatric‐confirmed COVID‐19 cases. Besides, a review was carried out by analysing all current literature about laboratory‐confirmed paediatric cases with COVID‐19.

Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 6 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, health services, COVID-19 | Countries: China
Close to contagion: the impact of COVID-19 on displaced and refugee girls and women
Institution: Plan International
Published: September 2020

Currently, as COVID-19 spreads across the world, an unprecedented 76.7 million people are living as refugees, or have been displaced inside their countries. Some 131 of the countries affected by COVID-19 have sizeable refugee populations and more than 80% of refugees are hosted in low- and middle-income countries including Uganda, Sudan, Pakistan and Turkey, with health systems that are ill-equipped to manage significant outbreaks. Refugee and IDP camps are mostly chronically overcrowded and measures to avoid community transmission of the virus, such as physical distancing and frequent handwashing, are difficult to implement. The absence of basic amenities, such as clean running water and soap, insufficient medical personnel, and poor access to health information, let alone access to masks, will make avoiding infection virtually impossible. Also, in many host countries, refugees’ entitlement to healthcare and social protection systems are restricted or non-existent, which increases their vulnerability even further.

Adapting HIV services for pregnant and breastfeeding women, infants, children, adolescents and families in resource‐constrained settings during the COVID‐19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Alexandra C. Vrazo; Rachel Golin; Nimasha B. Fernando (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Journal of the International AIDS Society
Protecting pregnant and breastfeeding women, infants, children and adolescents from acquiring SARS‐CoV‐2 while sustaining essential HIV services is an immense global health challenge. Tailored, family friendly programme adaptations for case‐finding, ART delivery and viral load monitoring for these populations have the potential to limit SARS‐CoV‐2 transmission while ensuring the continuity of life‐saving HIV case identification and treatment efforts.
Things must not fall apart: the ripple effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on children in sub-Saharan Africa

AUTHOR(S)
Modupe Coker; Morenike O. Folayan; Ian C. Michelow (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Pediatric Research
This article focuses on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on child health in sub-Saharan Africa. It reviews the epidemiology of major pediatric diseases and, referencing modeling projections, discuss the short- and long-term impact of the pandemic on major disease control. It also deliberates on potential complications of SARS-CoV-2 co-infections/co-morbidities and identify critical social and ethical issues. Furthermore, this article aims to highlight the paucity of COVID-19 data and clinical trials in this region and the lack of child participants in ongoing studies. Lastly, approaches and interventions to mitigate the pandemic’s impact on child health outcomes are discussed.
Levels and trends in child mortality
Institution: UNICEF Data & Analytics
Published: September 2020 UNICEF Publication
The progress in reducing child mortality around the world has been remarkable. Under-five mortality rates have declined by almost 60 per cent since 1990, and as a result millions more children survive to adolescence today than they did three decades ago. The impact of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, however, threatens years of improvement in child and adolescent survival through the interruption of essential health services. Even before the coronavirus captured the world’s attention, it was clear that if survival targets were to be met, resources and policy would need to be geared towards accelerating progress and not just maintaining it.
Hospital-based home care for children with cancer during the COVID-19 pandemic in northeastern Italy

AUTHOR(S)
Davide Massano; Laura Cosma; Martina Garolla (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Pediatric Blood & Cancer
This study describes the experience of an integrated project of telehealth and hospital-based home care (HBHC) for noncritical patients in active anticancer treatment in a tertiary care pediatric oncohematology center.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 1 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, health care facilities, health services | Countries: Italy
Management of hepatitis C in children and adolescents during COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Maria Pokorska-Śpiewak; Mateusz Śpiewak

Published: August 2020   Journal: World Journal of Hepatology
In recent years, significant progress in the antiviral treatment of chronic hepatitis C (CHC) has been made due to the development of interferon-free therapies. Three different highly effective, oral direct-acting antiviral (DAA) regimens have been approved for use in adolescents with CHC between the ages of 12-years-old and 17-years-old in Europe. According to the current recommendations, all treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced children with CHC virus infection should be considered for DAA therapy to prevent the possible progression of hepatitis C virus-related liver disease and its complications. However, the novel coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak, which was classified as a pandemic in March 2020, is currently spreading throughout the world, resulting in a disruption of the healthcare system. This disruption is having a negative impact on the care of patients with chronic diseases, including children with CHC. Thus, several efforts have to be made by pediatric hepatologists to prioritize patient care in children with CHC. These efforts include promoting telemedicine in the outpatient setting, using local laboratory testing for follow-up visits, and engaging in the home delivery of DAAs for patients under antiviral therapy whenever possible.
Child healthcare and immunizations in Sub-Saharan Africa during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Danilo Buonsenso; Bianca Cinicola; Memenatu Ngaima Kallon (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Frontiers in Pediatrics
Since COVID-19 in the pediatric population is infrequently severe, the indirect costs of the pandemic, related to the measures implemented to deal with the spread of the virus, can be worse than the infection itself. To assess this issue, this study evaluates the number of children vaccinated or evaluated for the most common diseases in a poor village in Sierra Leone, showing a worrisome drop in vaccinations performed and children evaluated for acute diseases. Preliminary findings highlight that support is needed to guarantee basic services to children during the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly in poor settings where preventive measures can be lifesaving in the long term.
Breastfeeding in India is disrupted as mothers and babies are separated in the pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Neha Bhatt

Published: August 2020   Journal: BMJ : British Medical Journal
Worldwide, breastfeeding rates have dropped by 40-50% in some hospitals during the pandemic. Before the pandemic only 41% of babies in India breastfed within an hour of being born, a number that has slid lower during the pandemic. The reasons are numerous, but chief among them is the widespread separation of mother and baby at birth because of confusion over guidelines and deep fear.
Impact of restrictions on parental presence in neonatal intensive care units related to coronavirus disease 2019

AUTHOR(S)
Ashley Darcy Mahoney; Robert D. White; Annalyn Velasquez (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Journal of Perinatology
This study aims to determine the relationship between the emergence of COVID-19 and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) family presence as well as how NICU design affects these changes. It is a cross-sectional survey from April 21 to 30, 2020 which queried sites regarding NICU demographics, NICU restrictions on parental presence, and changes in ancillary staff availability.
Pulse survey on continuity of essential health services during the COVID-19 pandemic: interim report, 27 August 2020
Institution: WHO
Published: August 2020
This survey aimes to gain initial insight from country key informants into the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on essential health services across the life course. The survey results in this interim report can improve our understanding of the extent of disruptions across all services, the reasons for disruptions, and the mitigation strategies countries are using to maintain service delivery.
Cite this research | No. of pages: 21 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, health services, COVID-19, impact | Publisher: WHO
Children's emergency presentations during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Damian Roland; Rachel Harwood; Nick Bishop (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in large-scale changes to the National Health Service (NHS) systems in the UK to accommodate a predicted surge in acutely unwell adults presenting to emergency and critical care departments. This article describes a rapid, multicentre surveillance project with three main aims: (1) to identify the number of children with delayed presentations to hospital in large emergency departments; (2) to find out what proportion of these delays was due to hesitance of parents in attending versus the proportion that was due to advice from primary care staff or NHS 111 referrals; and (3) to find out whether these delays might have resulted in harm to children (using admission to hospital as a proxy).

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 4 | Issue: 8 | No. of pages: e32-e33 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, emergency aid, health care facilities, health services, hospitalization | Countries: United Kingdom
Child healthcare and immunizations in Sub-Saharan Africa during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Danilo Buonsenso; Bianca Cinicola; Memenatu Ngaima Kallon (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Frontiers in Pediatrics
Since COVID-19 in the pediatric population is infrequently severe, the indirect costs of the pandemic, related to the measures implemented to deal with the spread of the virus, can be worse than the infection itself. To assess this issue, this study evaluates the number of children vaccinated or evaluated for the most common diseases in a poor village in Sierra Leone, showing a worrisome drop in vaccinations performed and children evaluated for acute diseases. Preliminary findings highlight that support is needed to guarantee basic services to children during the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly in poor settings where preventive measures can be lifesaving in the long term.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 4 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, health policy, health services, vaccination | Countries: Sierra Leone
16 - 30 of 42

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.