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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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91 - 105 of 127
Short-term developmental outcomes in neonates born to mothers with COVID-19 from Wuhan, China

AUTHOR(S)
Ling‑Kong Zeng; Hua‑Ping Zhu; Tian‑Tian Xiao (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: World Journal of Pediatrics
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARSCoV-2) is an emerging disease. The consequences of SARS-CoV-2 exposure in infants remain unknown. Therefore, this study aims to investigate whether neonates born to mothers with COVID-19 have adverse brain development. This multicenter observational study was conducted at two designated maternal and children’s hospitals in Hubei Province, mainland China from February 1, 2020 to May 15, 2020. Neonates born to mothers with COVID-19 were enrolled. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) fndings, and volumes of grey and white matters, and physical growth parameters were observed at 44 weeks corrected gestational age.
Mortality in children with COVID-19: Lessons learned from a tertiary referral hospital in Indonesia

AUTHOR(S)
Rismala Dewi; Nastiti Kaswandani; Mulya Rahma Karyanti (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: International journal of infectious diseases
The incidence of COVID-19 is still rapidly increasing, but little is known about the prevalence and characteristics of fatal cases in children in Indonesia. This study aims to describe the characteristics of pediatric COVID-19 cases with fatal outcomes in Indonesia's tertiary referral hospital. This is a cross-sectional study with data collected from the medical records of COVID-19 patients admitted to Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia, from March to October 2020.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 31 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child mortality, COVID-19, hospitalization, infectious disease | Countries: Indonesia
COVID-19 in children at Strasbourg University Hospital: a retrospective study of the first 2 months of the epidemic

AUTHOR(S)
O. Lavaine; J. Spizzo; C. Arbitre (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Archives de Pédiatrie

The emergence and rapid spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have shaken the planet, both in terms of health and economical aspects, constituting a real challenge for the scientific community. At the time of the arrival of the epidemic in France, there were limited data regarding how COVID-19 could affect children. A lesser severity compared with adults was described, but knowledge concerning clinical forms and screening strategies was missing. This retrospective and non-interventional epidemiological study aimed to describe the epidemiology and the clinical features of COVID-19 pediatric disease in the first university hospital affected by the epidemic in France.

Were pregnant women more affected by COVID-19 in the second wave of the pandemic?

AUTHOR(S)
Suraj Kadiwar; Jonathan J. Smith; Stephane Ledot (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: The Lancet Journal
At the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, there was justified concern that this disease might have similar effects on pregnant women as influenza or other coronavirus infections. During the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, influenza mortality in pregnant women in the USA was 4·3%. In global analyses, maternal deaths from severe acute respiratory syndrome or Middle East respiratory syndrome have been reported in 13% (n=24) and 40% (n=10) of published case reports, respectively. Reassuringly, US data from the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic (from January to June, 2020) show that death from COVID-19 during pregnancy was low (0·19%) and consistent with that of non-pregnant women of childbearing age (0·25%). However, by September, 2020, findings from a systematic review and meta-analysis of global data suggested that pregnancy is a significant risk factor for hospitalisation and more severe illness, with a critical care admission odds ratio for pregnant women with COVID-19 compared with infected women of childbearing age of 2·13 (95% CI 1·53–2·95) and an invasive ventilation odds ratio of 2·59 (2·28–2·94).
Changes in children’s surgical services during the COVID-19 pandemic at a tertiary-level government hospital in a lower middle-income country

AUTHOR(S)
Md. Abdullah Al Farooq; S M Humayun Kabir; Tanvir Kabir Chowdhury (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: BMJ Paediatrics Open
The aim of this study was to quantify the changes that occurred in the surgical services of children during the COVID-19 pandemic from the perspective of a low/middle-income country. Design A case–control study was conducted at a large referral centre in Bangladesh among patients aged ≤12 years. Comparisons were made between cases admitted during a period of ‘April to September 2020’ (Pandemic period) and controls during a similar period in 2019 (Reference period). The number of admissions and outpatient department (OPD) attendances, age and sex distribution, diagnosis, number and types of surgeries performed (elective vs emergency), variations in treatment of acute appendicitis, types of anaesthesia and mortality were compared
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 5 | Issue: 1 | No. of pages: 6 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child care services, child health, COVID-19 response, hospitalization, low-income countries | Countries: Bangladesh
Obstetrical and newborn outcomes among patients with SARS-CoV-2 during pregnancy
Published: March 2021   Journal: JOGC : Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada
This is a report on the perinatal outcomes of pregnant patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) from 2 hospitals in Montréal, Québec. Outcomes of 45 patients with SARS-CoV-2 during pregnancy were compared with those of 225 patients without infection. Sixteen percent of patients with SARS-CoV-2 delivered preterm, compared with 9% of patients without (P = 0.28). Median gestational age at delivery (39.3 (interquartile range [IQR] 37.7–40.4) wk vs. 39.1 [IQR 38.3-40.1] wk) and median birthweight (3250 [IQR 2780-3530] g vs. 3340 [IQR 3025-3665] g) were similar between groups. The rate of cesarean delivery was 29% for patients with SARS-CoV-2. Therefore, we did not find important differences in outcomes associated with SARS-CoV-2. Our findings may be limited to women with mild COVID-19 diagnosed in the third trimester.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 43 | Issue: 4 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: COVID-19, hospitalization, maternal and child health, pregnancy, pregnant women | Countries: Canada
Social determinants of health and Coronavirus disease 2019 in pregnancy

AUTHOR(S)
Lakha Prasannan; Burton Rochelson; Weiwei Shan (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology
The social and physical environments in which people live affect the emergence, prevalence and severity of both infectious and non-infectious diseases. There is limited data on how such social determinants of health (SDH), including neighborhood socioeconomic conditions, affect the risk of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and severity of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) during pregnancy. This paper's objective was to determine how SDH are associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection and the severity of COVID-19 illness in hospitalized pregnant patients in New York during the global COVID-19 pandemic.
Supporting parents as essential care partners in neonatal units during the SARS‐CoV‐2 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Nicole R. van Veenendaal; Aniko Deierl; Fabiana Bacchini (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Acta Paediatrica

This study aims to review the evidence on safety of maintaining family integrated care practices and the effects of restricting parental participation in neonatal care during the SARS‐CoV‐2 pandemic. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINAHL databases were searched from inception to the 14th of October 2020. Records were included if they reported scientific, empirical research (qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods) on the effects of restricting or promoting family integrated care practices for parents of hospitalized neonates during the SARS‐CoV‐2 pandemic. Two authors independently screened abstracts, appraised study quality and extracted study and outcome data.

Care of hospitalized infants and their families during the COVID-19 pandemic: an international survey

AUTHOR(S)
Ita Litmanovitz; Dalia Silberstein; Samantha Butler (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Journal of Perinatology
This research study explored changes in family-centered care practices for hospitalized infants and families due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This exploratory descriptive study used a 49-item online survey, distributed to health care professionals working with hospitalized infants and families. The sample consisted of 96 participants from 22 countries.
The severity and atypical presentations of COVID-19 infection in pediatrics

AUTHOR(S)
Nagwan Y. Saleh; Hesham M. Aboelghar; Sherif S. Salem (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: BMC Pediatrics
Emergence of 2019-nCoV attracted global attention and WHO declared COVID-19 a public health emergency of international concern. Therefore this study aimed to explore the severity and atypical manifestations of COVID-19 among children. This is an observational cohort study conducted on 398 children with confirmed COVID-19 by using realtime reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of 2019-nCoV nucleic acid during the period from March to November 2020. Patients were subdivided regarding the severity of COVID-19 presentation into Group I (Non-severe COVID-19) was admitted into wards and Group II (Severe COVID-19) admitted into the PICU.
Maintaining maternal–newborn safety during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Nancy A. Patric; Teresa S. Johnson

Published: March 2021   Journal: Nursing for Women's Health
COVID-19, the disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, was declared a global pandemic by the World Health Organization on March 11, 2020. In addition to older individuals and those with underlying chronic health conditions, maternal and newborn populations were also identified as being at greater risk. It became critical for hospitals and clinicians to maintain the safety of individuals in the facility and minimize the transmission of COVID-19 while continuing to strive for optimized outcomes by providing family-centered care. Rapid change during the pandemic made it appropriate to use the plan–do–study–act (PDSA) cycle to continually evaluate proposed and standard practices. Our team established an obstetric COVID-19 unit for women and newborns, developed guidelines for visitation and for the use of personal protective equipment, initiated universal COVID-19 testing, and provided health education to emphasize shared decision making.
Child and pet care‐planning during COVID‐19: considerations for the evolving family unit

AUTHOR(S)
Britni L. Adams; Jennifer W. Applebaum; Michelle N. Eliasson (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Family Relations

Using a mixed‐methods design, this paper aimed to understand household dynamics and choices in hypothetical planning for child and pet care if an individual is faced with hospitalization for COVID‐19. As the COVID‐19 public health crisis persists, children and pets are vulnerable to caregiver hospitalization.

The role of pandemic‐related pregnancy stress in preference for community birth during the beginning of the COVID‐19 pandemic in the United States

AUTHOR(S)
Heidi Preis; Brittain Mahaffey; Marci Lobel

Published: March 2021   Journal: Birth
The COVID‐19 pandemic introduced unparalleled uncertainty into the lives of pregnant women, including concerns about where it is the safest to give birth, while preserving their rights and wishes. Reports on the increased interest in community births (at home or in birth centers) are emerging. The purpose of this project was to quantitatively investigate psychological factors related to this birth preference.
Unintended consequences of restrictive visitation policies during the COVID-19 pandemic: implications for hospitalized children

AUTHOR(S)
Jean L. Raphael; Woodie Kessel; Mona Patel

Published: March 2021   Journal: Pediatric research
The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in devastating consequences worldwide with over 2,000,000 deaths. Although COVID-19 demonstrates less morbidity and mortality among children,1 it has dramatically altered the health-care experience for children and families. This is particularly true for those cared for in inpatient settings. The competing priorities of safeguarding families and health-care personne from a serious infection, stewardship of limited resources, ensuring family-centered care (FCC), and carrying out end-of-life care have led to tensions in how to effectively implement and execute necessary restrictive visitation policies. While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provides broad guidelines to health-care facilities on the management of visitors, hospitals must determine how to implement such guidelines.
‘Do I, don’t I?’ a qualitative study addressing parental perceptions about seeking healthcare during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Gabriella Watson; Lucy Pickard; Bhanu Williams (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Archives of disease in childhood
Paediatric emergency departments have seen reduced attendance during the COVID-19 pandemic. Late paediatric presentations may lead to severe illness and even death. Maintaining provision of healthcare through a pandemic is essential. This qualitative study aims to identify changing care-seeking behaviours in child health during the pandemic and ascertain parental views around barriers to care.
91 - 105 of 127

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.