CONNECT
search advanced search
UNICEF Innocenti
Office of Research-Innocenti
search menu

Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

RESULTS:   61     SORT BY:

ADVANCED SEARCH:

Select one or more filter options and click search below.

PUBLICATION DATE:
UNICEF Innocenti Publication
UNICEF Publication
Open Access
JOURNAL ACCESS FOR UNICEF STAFF CONTACT US
31 - 45 of 61
Multisystem inflammatory syndrome associated with COVID-19 in children in Pakistan

AUTHOR(S)
Masood Sadiq; Omeir Ali Aziz; Uzma Kazmi (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
The knowledge of COVID-19 is evolving with new aspects of the disease continuing to emerge. Children and adolescents younger than 20 years of age constitute 10·6% of the total reported confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Pakistan as of July 8, 2020, with a mortality of 0·3% for those aged 10 years or younger and 0·5% for those aged 11–20 years. Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), also known as paediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome temporally associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (PIMS-TS) is being reported primarily from Europe and the USA. Many of these children meet the criteria for complete or incomplete Kawasaki disease, but different clinical presentations of this inflammatory disorder are being reported. The ethnic origin of reported cases show that Black, Hispanic, and Asian children might be disproportionally affected. Similarly, unlike Kawasaki disease, these cases have occurred in older children and adolescents.
Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children in South Africa

AUTHOR(S)
Kate Webb; Deepthi Raju Abraham; Ayodele Faleye (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
There are reports of a multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children associated with COVID-19 known as MIS-C or paediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome temporally associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (PIMS-TS).  The definition of MIS-C issued by WHO includes clinical and laboratory features, with evidence of COVID-19, or likely contact with a person who has or has had COVID-19. South Africa has the most reported COVID-19 cases in Africa, with the Western Cape Province acting as the initial epicentre with a total of 93.414 people with confirmed COVID-19 by July 31, 2020, of whom 2910 were younger than 15 years old.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 4 | Issue: 10 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, respiratory diseases, infectious disease, COVID-19 | Countries: South Africa
What chances do children have against COVID-19? Is the answer hidden within the thymus?

AUTHOR(S)
Hatice Güneş; Serpil Dinçer; Can Acıpayam (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: European Journal of Pediatrics
As with other types of coronaviruses, SARS-CoV-2 affects children less frequently, and it has been observed that the disease is mild. In the pathogenesis of a standard viral infection, the pathogen’s contact with the mucosa is initially followed by an innate immunity response. T cells are the primary decisive element in adaptive immunity capability. For this reason, the adaptive immune response mediated by the thymus is a process that regulates the immune response responsible for preventing invasive damage from a virus. Regulatory T cells (T-reg) are active during the early periods of life and have precise roles in immunomodulation. The thymus is highly active in the intrauterine and neonatal period; it begins to shrink after birth and continues its activity until adolescence. The loss of T-reg function by age results in difficulty with the control of the immune response, increased inflammation as shown in coronavirus disease (COVID-19) as an inflammatory storm. Also, the thymus is typically able to replace the T cells destroyed by apoptosis caused by the virus. Thymus and T cells are the key factors of pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 in children. Since thymus activity and T lymphocyte function in children protect them against the virus effects, stimulating and preventing the inhibition of the thymus can be possible treatment components against COVID-19.
Neonatal management and outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic: an observation cohort study

AUTHOR(S)
Christine M. Salvatore; Jin-Young Han; Karen P. Acker (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
The risk of vertical and perinatal transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19), the most appropriate management, and the neonate's risk of developing COVID-19 during the perinatal period are unknown. This observational cohort study, conducted on neonates born to mothers positive for SARS-CoV-2 at delivery, aims to identify best practices in infection control within mother–newborn dyads, as well as potential risk factors associated with transmission. 
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 4 | Issue: 11 | No. of pages: 721-727 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child and maternal health, infectious disease, COVID-19 | Countries: United States
Susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection among children and adolescents compared with adults

AUTHOR(S)
Russell M. Viner; Oliver T. Mytton; Chris Bonell (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: JAMA Pediatrics

In this systematic review and meta-analysis including 32 studies, children and adolescents younger than 20 years had 44% lower odds of secondary infection with SARS-CoV-2 compared with adults 20 years and older; this finding was most marked in those younger than 10 to 14 years. Data were insufficient to conclude whether transmission of SARS-CoV-2 by children is lower than by adults. Preliminary evidence suggests that children have a lower susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection compared with adults, but the role that children and adolescents play in transmission of this virus remains unclear.

The wide spectrum of COVID-19 clinical presentation in children

AUTHOR(S)
Nadia Nathan; Blandine Prevost; Chiara Sileo (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Journal of Clinical Medicine
 Ten months after its appearance in December 2019, SARS-CoV-2 has infected more than 25 million patients worldwide. Because children were first identified as potential spreaders of the virus, schools were closed in several countries. However, it rapidly became evident that the number of hospitalized children infected by SARS-CoV-2 was dramatically lower than that of adults. To date, only hypotheses have been raised to explain this difference, so it is of great importance to describe the presentation of this disease among children. This study describes a wide spectrum of COVID-19 manifestation in children in a dedicated pediatric unit in France.
Responding to non-communicable diseases during and beyond the COVID-19 pandemic

This brief provides guidance for governments, policymakers, UN agencies and development partners to address non-communicable diseases (NCDs) as an integral part of the COVID-19 response and in broader efforts for achieving the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. NCDs, such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes and chronic respiratory disease, are amplifying the impacts of COVID-19, and COVID-19 is exacerbating the burden of NCDs, particularly in already disadvantaged communities. Almost one fourth (22%) of the global population is estimated to have an underlying condition that increases their vulnerability to COVID-19, and most of these conditions are NCDs. Urgent action across sectors is needed to address the root causes of NCDs and increase access to affordable and quality treatments and prevention.

A citizen science facemask experiment and educational modules to improve coronavirus safety in communities and schools

AUTHOR(S)
Sarah E. Eichler; Austin P. Hopperton; Juan José Alava (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Frontiers in Medicine
There is need to support facemask citizen science and experiential education among children and families as the globe exits from the current lockdown, and teachers and students desire and seek for safe strategies to return to densely-attended schools. COVID-19 is a pandemic respiratory disease that disseminates as infectious respiratory or saliva droplets are released into the environment as people talk, sneeze, and cough. Currently the most publicized methods to prevent local transmission of COVID-19 and promote “droplet safety” in hospitals and communities include hand washing, social distancing, and stay-at-home strategies. In contrast to established benefits for medical masks in hospitals, the benefits of wearing masks or face covers/coverings (hereafter, “facemask”) in the community have been inconsistently debated by the media, creating confusion, and misinformation. Furthermore, high-profile political leaders in countries heavily affected by the pandemic have given misleading signs regarding containment measures associated with COVID-19 increasingly polarizing local communities around arguments on the value of facemasks in promoting public health, which is critically important to incentivize during the emergence of citizens from their lockdowns and during the phase of reopening local economies.
A case for girl-child education to prevent and curb the impact of emerging infectious diseases epidemics

AUTHOR(S)
Shadrack Frimpong; Elijah Paintsil

Published: September 2020   Journal: Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine
Not only do epidemics such as HIV/AIDS, Ebola Virus Disease (EVD), and the current Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) cause the loss of millions of lives, but they also cost the global economy billions of dollars. Consequently, there is an urgent need to formulate interventions that will help control their spread and impact when they emerge. The education of young girls and women is one such historical approach. They are usually the vulnerable targets of disease outbreaks – they are most likely to be vehicles for the spread of epidemics due to their assigned traditional roles in resource-limited countries. Based on our work and the work of others on educational interventions, this study proposes six critical components of a cost-effective and sustainable response to promote girl-child education in resource-limited settings.
A national consensus management pathway for paediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome temporally associated with COVID-19 (PIMS-TS): results of a national Delphi process

AUTHOR(S)
Rachel Harwood; Benjamin Allin; Christine E. Jones (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
Paediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome temporally associated with COVID-19 (PIMS-TS) is a novel condition that was first reported in April, 2020. This study aims to develop a national consensus management pathway for the UK to provide guidance for clinicians caring for children with PIMS-TS.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 10 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, medical care, infectious disease | Countries: United Kingdom
SARS-CoV-2 transmission, the ambiguous role of children and considerations for the reopening of schools in the fall

AUTHOR(S)
Cleo Anastassopoulou; Nicholas Spanakis; Athanasios Tsakris

Published: September 2020   Journal: Future Microbiology
The reopening of schools in the fall entails risks given the controversies in pediatricCOVID-19 pathogenesis and the ambiguous role of children in transmission.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 150 | Issue: 13 | No. of pages: 1201-1206 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, school attendance, infectious disease, COVID-19 response
Social distancing for COVID-19 and diagnoses of other infectious diseases in children

AUTHOR(S)
Jonathan Hatoun; Emily Trudell Correa; Sara Mary Alice Donahue (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Pediatrics
Social distancing (SD) during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has largely removed children from school, day care, and other contact with peers. In addition to reducing transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, these changes would be expected to reduce the transmission of other infectious diseases among children. This study aims to determine the effect of SD on 12 infectious diseases commonly diagnosed in pediatric primary care that are contagious to various extents.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 146 | Issue: 4 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child diseases, child health, infectious disease | Countries: United States
SARS-CoV-2 infections in children and young people

AUTHOR(S)
Susanna Felsenstein; Christian Hedrich

Published: September 2020   Journal: Clinical Immunology
This manuscript reviews age-related host factors that may protect children from COVID-19 and complications associated, and addresses the confusion around seropositivity and immunity.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 2200 | No. of pages: 7 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, child immunization, infectious disease, COVID-19
Parents’ knowledge and attitude towards COVID‐19 in children: a Jordanian study

AUTHOR(S)
Sawsan Abuhammad

Published: August 2020   Journal: The International Journal of Clinical Practice

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has had a rapid global spread.  All individuals of all age groups are at risk of COVID-19. This study aims to describe the knowledge and attitude of Jordanian parents regarding COVID-19 in children, including clinical signs of the disease, modes of transmission and protection measures. A cross-section study among Jordanian parents was conducted. The size of the sample was 810. Information regarding the clinical signs of the disease, modes of transmission, protection measures against COVID-19 and satisfaction with governmental measures was collected.


Burden of illness in households with severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2–infected children

AUTHOR(S)
Mehgan F. Teherani; Carol M. Kao; Andres Camacho-Gonzalez (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society
This study investigated of illness among household members of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)–infected children receiving medical care (n = 32). The study identified 144 household contacts (HCs): 58 children and 86 adults. Forty-six percent of HCs developed symptoms consistent with coronavirus disease. Child-to-adult transmission was suspected in 7 cases.
31 - 45 of 61

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE DATABASE

Subscribe to updates on new research about COVID-19 & children

SIGN UP TO OUR NEWSLETTER

Share:

facebook twitter linkedin google+ reddit print email
Campaign Campaign

COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.