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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1 - 15 of 352
Emotional competence, family social support and parental stress in mothers of children with autism during the pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Dinie Ratri Desiningrum

Published: June 2022   Journal: Journal of Educational, Health and Community Psychology

This study was aimed to determine the relationship between emotional competence, family social support and parental stress in mothers of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This research was a quantitative research with correlational method. Purposive sampling technique by distributing questionnaires using Google form resulted in a total of 165 participants who are mothers of children with ASD, as members of therapy centers and schools for children with special needs in Semarang, Solo and Yogyakarta. The data were analyzed using structural equation model (SEM) technique on Lisrel program. This research resulted in two models showing that there are fit model with empirical data. The first model shows that each of emotional competence and family social support had a significant effect on parental stress in mothers of children with ASD. The second model shows the influence of emotional competence on the stress of parenting of children with ASD, with family social support as a moderating variable. The implications of this study are empirical evidence on the importance of family social support and emotional competence for mothers in raising children with ASD to prevent excessive parental stress.

Experiences with antenatal care, breastfeeding education, and employment during the COVID-19 pandemic: perspectives from mothers and healthcare workers in Kenya

AUTHOR(S)
Scott Ickes; Hellen Lemein; Kelly Arensen (et al.)

Published: June 2022   Journal: Current Developments in Nutrition

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on breastfeeding practices in low and middle-income countries is not well understood. Modifications in breastfeeding guidelines and delivery platforms for breastfeeding education are hypothesized to have affected breastfeeding practices during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study aimed to understand the experiences with perinatal care, breastfeeding education and practice among mothers who delivered infants during the COVID-19 pandemic. It conducted key informant interviews among 35 mothers with deliveries since March 2020 and 10 healthcare workers (HCW) from two public health facilities in Naivasha, Kenya.

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 6 | Issue: Supplement 1 | No. of pages: 1 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: breastfeeding, COVID-19, infectious disease, maternal and child health, pandemic, pregnancy, pregnant women | Countries: Kenya
Maternal depressive symptoms and early childhood temperament before and during the COVID‐19 pandemic in the United Kingdom

AUTHOR(S)
Abigail Fiske; Gaia Scerif; Karla Holmboe

Published: June 2022   Journal: Infant and Child Development
The COVID-19 pandemic is an unexpected and major global event, with the potential to have many and varied impacts on child development. However, the implications of the pandemic for maternal depressive symptoms, early childhood temperament dimensions, and their associations, remain largely unknown. To investigate this, questionnaires were completed by mothers (N = 175) before and during the pandemic when their child was 10- and 16-months old (Study 1), and by an extended group of mothers with young children (6–48 months; 66 additional mothers) during the first and second national lockdowns in the United Kingdom in 2020 (Study 2).
Sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and maternal, neonatal and child health (MNCH) in Bangladesh: impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Tabitha Hrynick; Violet Barasa; Syed Abbas

Institution: Institute of Development Studies
Published: May 2022
The Covid-19 pandemic has exacerbated and drawn fresh attention to long-standing systemic weaknesses in health and economic systems. The virus – and the public health response – has wrought significant disruption on sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and maternal, neonatal and child health (MNCH) in Bangladesh. Known negative health outcomes include increased domestic and gender-based violence, child marriage, negative mental health, and adverse child health outcomes. This scoping paper for the Covid-19 Learning, Evidence and Research Programme for Bangladesh (CLEAR) aims to inform future research and policy engagement to support response, recovery, progress, and future health system resilience for SRHR and MNCH in Bangladesh, following the Covid-19 crisis. We present what is known on disruptions and impacts, as well as evidence gaps and priority areas for future research and engagement.
Systematic review and meta-analysis of the effectiveness and perinatal outcomes of COVID-19 vaccination in pregnancy.

AUTHOR(S)
Smriti Prasad; Erkan Kalafat; Helena Blakeway (et al.)

Published: May 2022   Journal: Nature Communications
Safety and effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines during pregnancy is a particular concern affecting vaccination uptake by this vulnerable group. Here we evaluated evidence from 23 studies including 117,552 COVID-19 vaccinated pregnant people, almost exclusively with mRNA vaccines. This study shows that the effectiveness of mRNA vaccination against RT-PCR confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection 7 days after second dose was 89·5% (95% CI 69·0-96·4%, 18,828 vaccinated pregnant people, I2 = 73·9%). The risk of stillbirth was significantly lower in the vaccinated cohort by 15% (pooled OR 0·85; 95% CI 0·73–0·99, 66,067 vaccinated vs. 424,624 unvaccinated, I2 = 93·9%). There was no evidence of a higher risk of adverse outcomes including miscarriage, earlier gestation at birth, placental abruption, pulmonary embolism, postpartum haemorrhage, maternal death, intensive care unit admission, lower birthweight Z-score, or neonatal intensive care unit admission (p > 0.05 for all). COVID-19 mRNA vaccination in pregnancy appears to be safe and is associated with a reduction in stillbirth.
Uptake of COVID-19 vaccines among pregnant women: a systematic review and meta-analysis

AUTHOR(S)
Petros Galanis; Irene Vraka; Olga Siskou (et al.)

Published: May 2022   Journal: Vaccines
Mass vaccination against COVID-19 is essential to control the pandemic. COVID-19 vaccines are now recommended during pregnancy to prevent adverse outcomes. This review aimed to evaluate the evidence in the literature regarding the uptake of COVID-19 vaccinations among pregnant women. A comprehensive search was performed in PubMed, Medline, Scopus, ProQuest, Web of Science, CINAHL, and medRxiv from inception to 23 March 2022. A meta-analysis to estimate the overall proportion of pregnant women vaccinated against COVID-19 was performed. 11 studies including 703,004 pregnant women were found.
COVID-19 pandemic-related restrictions: factors that may affect perinatal maternal mental health and implications for infant development

AUTHOR(S)
Theano Kokkinaki; Eleftheria Hatzidaki

Published: May 2022   Journal: Frontiers in Pediatrics
This review aims to discuss the factors that may affect maternal mental health and infant development in COVID-19 pandemic condition. Toward this direction, the two objectives of this review are the following: (a) to discuss possible factors that may have affected negatively perinatal mental health through the pandemic-related restrictions; and (b) to present the implications of adversely affected maternal emotional wellbeing on infant development.
Breastfeeding in the context of Covid19: benefits for mothers

AUTHOR(S)
Iliadou Maria; Potamianou Irene; Askeridou Georgia

Published: April 2022   Journal: World Journal of Advanced Research and Reviews
Coronavirus 19 disease can cause short as well as long-term effects on human health and function. In particular, its response measures affect breastfeeding and pregnant women in general, resulting in a variety of issues such as changes in breastfeeding practices and increased stress levels. However, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends exclusive breastfeeding at least for the first six months of a child's life, even if the mother herself is ill, and only if her health condition allows it.
This paper provides general information about Covid 19 disease, how it affects breastfeeding, and what benefits will be visible to the breastfeeding mother in a direct or indirect way.
Pandemic beyond the virus: maternal COVID-related postnatal stress is associated with infant temperament.

AUTHOR(S)
Catherine Bianco; Ayesha Sania; Margaret H. Kyle

Published: April 2022   Journal: Pediatric Research
Studies have shown that infant temperament varies with maternal psychosocial factors, in utero illness, and environmental stressors. This study predicted that the pandemic would shape infant temperament through maternal SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy and/or maternal postnatal stress. To test this, it examined associations among infant temperament, maternal prenatal SARS-CoV-2 infection, maternal postnatal stress, and postnatal COVID-related life disruptions.
Becoming a mother during COVID-19: adjustments in performing motherhood

AUTHOR(S)
Clémence Jullien; Roger Jeffery (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Medicine Anthropology Theory 
Based on online semi-structured interviews with middle-class women who were pregnant or had recently given birth in Western Europe (France, Spain, the United Kingdom, and Switzerland), this study analyses how motherhood has been experienced and performed during the COVID-19 pandemic. The article reflects on the specific new risk assessments and responsibilities that emerged during the pandemic by showing women’s coping strategies concerning lockdowns and other public health measures. Using a COVID-19 lens also allows a broader analysis of middle-class families’ concerns about performing ‘good motherhood’. By highlighting the discrepancies between women’s expected and actual experiences, the prescriptive aspects of pregnancy, delivery, and the postpartum phase are revealed and analysed, prompting us to consider parenting as a form of doing and proving. By underlining the importance attached to the expectant mother’s wellbeing, the partner’s involvement, the support of relatives, and the future socialisation of the baby, we argue that women face a myriad of imperatives to ensure a meaningful experience of motherhood.
Regulations and behavior of Dayak community teenage pregnancy care in the new normal era

AUTHOR(S)
Legawati ; Y. Warella; Z. Shaluhiyah (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: The International Journal of Health Sciences
Regulations regarding prenatal care are also believed to have a positive impact on the behavior of care that needs to be carried out by adolescents. Targeted or focused regulation is believed to be able to make prenatal care a priority, with positive expected outcomes from the implementation or regulation. This study aims to explore the regulation and behavior of adolescent pregnancy care in the Dayak community in the Covid-19 Pandemic Era. This study uses a qualitative approach with semi-structured in-depth interview techniques.
Breastfeeding and the COVID-19 Epidemic in Vietnam.

AUTHOR(S)
Thi Thuy Duong Doan; Ngoc Minh Pham; Yun Zhao (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
No abstract available
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 24 | Issue: 4 | No. of pages: 411-412 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: breastfeeding, COVID-19, infectious disease, maternal and child health, pandemic | Countries: Viet Nam
impact of the covid 19 pandemic on the process of exclusive breastfeeding

AUTHOR(S)
Nurul Anjarwati; Veny Erlisa Irawan

Published: April 2022   Journal: Jurnal Kesehatan Mesencephalon
Impact of COVID-19 pandemic on health occurred in all age groups including pregnant women, mothers giving birth, and newborns. Breastfeeding during a pandemic requires special attention because of the short-term and long-term health implications. The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the success of exclusive breastfeeding. The research design is qualitative with in-depth interview data collection methods on 7 participants. The sample was selected according to the inclusion criteria, namely mothers who gave birth during a pandemic and when data were collected on children aged 6-12 months in the working area of the Kepanjen Health Center, Kab. Poor. Researchers as the main instrument in the study and interview guides as a reference for questions.
Experiences of at-risk women in accessing breastfeeding social support during the Covid-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Emila Siwik; Samantha Larose; Dalia Peres (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Journal of Human Lactation

With strict public health measures implemented in March 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many breastfeeding parents, who are within an at-risk population, have experienced limited formal and/or informal breastfeeding social support. In the Canadian context, the experiences of these women is unknown. This study aims to explore the experiences of at-risk postpartum breastfeeding women in accessing formal and informal breastfeeding social support during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Evaluation of postpartum depression and maternal attachment scale in a low socioeconomic level region: how was it affected during the Covid-19 pandemic period?

AUTHOR(S)
Ramazan Denizli; Nihat Farisoğulları; Bedri Sakcak (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Medical Science and Discovery

This study aimed to investigate the frequency of Postpartum Depression (PPD) and maternal attachment status in a region with a low socioeconomic level during the Covid-19 pandemic.Two hundred women who gave birth in our hospital were evaluated on postpartum 10th day with Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and Maternal Attachment Inventory (MBI).

1 - 15 of 352

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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The first digest covers children and youth mental health under COVID-19.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.