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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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Pregnant women with COVID-19: the placental involvement and consequences

AUTHOR(S)
Shahrzad Aghaamoo; Kamran Ghods; Mojgan Rahmanian

Published: May 2021   Journal: Journal of Molecular Histology
This study investigated the potential undesirable maternal and feto-neonatal consequences of COVID-19, and the related pathophysiological alterations in mother, neonate, and especially in the placenta as a vital organ, were reviewed. Also, the possibility of vertical transmission of virus and placental abnormalities were evaluated. The pregnant women were a vulnerable population for COVID-19, and several obstetric consequences were reported following SARS-CoV-2 infection. The higher risk of abruption, preterm labor, maternal death, stillbirth, intrauterine growth restriction, and newborns with fetal distress were adverse pregnancy and perinatal outcomes of COVID-19.
Factors affecting delivery health service satisfaction of women and fear of COVID− 19: implications for maternal and child health in Pakistan

AUTHOR(S)
Sara Rizvi Jafree; Ainul Momina; Amina Muazzam (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Maternal and Child Health Journal
High maternal and neonatal mortality rates in developing regions like Pakistan are linked to low rates of institutional deliveries. One way to improve rates of institutional deliveries is through improving institutional delivery service satisfaction in women. The aim of this research is to identify which factors influence delivery service satisfaction during the period of COVID-19 and which socio-demographic characteristics of women are associated with greater fear of catching COVID-19 during institutional deliveries.
A comprehensive analysis of maternal and newborn disease and related control for COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Nevio Cimolai

Published: March 2021   Journal: SN Comprehensive Clinical Medicine
The maternal-fetal/newborn unit is established at risk for COVID-19 infection. This narrative review summarizes the contemporary and cumulative publications which detail maternal infection, antenatal and newborn infections, and maternal/fetal/newborn management and prevention. There is a wide spectrum of maternal disease, but the potential for severe disease albeit in a minority is confirmed. COVID-19 carries risk for preterm delivery. Pregnant females can suffer multisystem disease, and co-morbidities play a significant role in risk. Congenital infection has been supported by several anecdotal reports, but strong confirmatory data are few. No typical congenital dysmorphisms are evident. Nevertheless, placental vascular compromise must be considered a risk for the fetus during advanced maternal infections. Clinical manifestations of newborn infection have been mild to moderate and relatively uncommon.
The changing aspects of motherhood in face of the COVID-19 pandemic in low- and middle-income countries

AUTHOR(S)
Jennifer Prince Kingsley; Paul Kingsley Vijay; Jacob Kumaresan (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Maternal and Child Health Journal
The aim of this article is to advocate perspectives to strengthen existing healthcare systems to prioritize maternal health services amidst and beyond the COVID-19 pandemic in low- and middle income countries. COVID-19 directly affects pregnant women causing more severe disease and adverse pregnancy outcomes. The indirect effects due to the monumental COVID-19 response are much worse, increasing maternal and neonatal mortality.
Early indirect impact of COVID-19 pandemic on utilization and outcomes of reproductive, maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health services in Kenya

AUTHOR(S)
Duncan Shikuku; Irene Nyaoke; Sylvia Gichuru (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: MedRxiv
The COVID-19 global pandemic is expected to result in 8.3-38.6% additional maternal deaths in many low-income countries. The objective of this paper was to determine the initial impact of COVID-19 pandemic on reproductive, maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health (RMNCAH) services in Kenya.
Early estimates of the indirect effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on maternal and child mortality in low-income and middle-income countries: a modelling study

AUTHOR(S)
Timothy Robertson; Emily Carter; Victoria Chou (et al.)

Published: July 2020   Journal: The Lancet Global Health
While the COVID-19 pandemic will increase mortality due to the virus, it is also likely to increase mortality indirectly. This study estimates the additional maternal and under-5 child deaths resulting from the potential disruption of health systems and decreased access to food. Estimates show that if routine health care is disrupted and access to food is decreased (as a result of unavoidable shocks, health system collapse, or intentional choices made in responding to the pandemic), the increase in child and maternal deaths will be substantial. 
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.