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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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16 - 30 of 50
Shared decision‐making for infant feeding and care during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Laura N. Haiek; Michelle LeDrew; Christiane Charette (et al.)

Published: December 2020   Journal: Maternal and Child Nutrition
Despite decades of research establishing the importance of breastfeeding, skin‐to‐skin contact and mother–infant closeness, the response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) pandemic has underscored the hidden assumption that these practices can be dispensed with no consequences to mother or child. This article aims to support shared decision‐making process for infant feeding and care with parents and health care providers during the unprecedented times of the pandemic.
Experiences, attitudes, and needs of users of a pregnancy and parenting app (Baby Buddy) during the COVID-19 pandemic: mixed methods study

AUTHOR(S)
Alexandra Rhodes; Sara Kheireddine; Andrea D. Smith

Published: December 2020   Journal: JMIR Mhealth Uhealth
The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the lives of expectant parents and parents of young babies, with disruptions in health care provision and loss of social support. Objective: This study investigated the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and its associated lockdown on this population through the lens of users of the UK National Health Service–approved pregnancy and parenting smartphone app, Baby Buddy. The study aims were threefold: to gain insights into the attitudes and experiences of expectant and recent parents (with babies under 24 weeks of age) during the COVID-19 pandemic; to investigate whether Baby Buddy is meeting users’ needs during this time; and to identify ways to revise the content of Baby Buddy to better support its users now and in future.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 8 | Issue: 12 | No. of pages: 15 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: early childhood, health care facilities, maternal and child health, pregnancy, COVID-19 response, lockdown | Countries: United Kingdom
An analysis of mother stress before and during COVID-19 pandemic: the case of China

AUTHOR(S)
Alain Rodrigue Tchimtchoua Tamo

Published: December 2020   Journal: Health Care for Women International
This study aimed to examine the relations between mothers’ stress (PSI-SF) and their children during the COVID-19 pandemic confinement in mainland China (N  = 274; mean age = 32.95, SD = 5.59). Its analyses revealed mothers identified more stress problems during the confinement than before including Difficult Child, Parental Distress, and Parent-Child Dysfunctional Interaction, which predicted requests for clinical or parents support services. Mothers living in rural areas reported less stress. Single mothers and those in small households displayed a higher level of stress. This research results may assist policymakers, professionals, and researchers to design support needed to promote families’ psychological well-being.
Maternity and child care amidst COVID-19 pandemic: a forgotten agenda

AUTHOR(S)
Navneet Kaur Manchanda

Published: December 2020   Journal: Journal of Global Health
The outbreak of COVID-19 pandemic has put economies across the globe in an unexpected hibernation as governments of many countries have announced weeks-long lockdown to flatten the curve of infection. It cannot be debunked that the lockdown was deemed as ‘the essential vaccine’ in the current times, but unfortunately, it is coming with a critical trade-off . The trade-off, not of economic costs vs human life, which has been much debated and documented but of one human life vs another. Specifically, in case of India, with a population of 1.3 billion, of which more than two-third are situated in rural settlements, this outbreak has become quite intimidating as the already limited health infrastructure has come under severe pressure to cater to the patients with the contagion.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 10 | Issue: 2 | No. of pages: 3 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: economic crisis, health care facilities, health services, maternal and child health, COVID-19 response, lockdown | Countries: India
The changing aspects of motherhood in face of the COVID-19 pandemic in low- and middle-income countries

AUTHOR(S)
Jennifer Prince Kingsley; Paul Kingsley Vijay; Jacob Kumaresan (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Maternal and Child Health Journal
The aim of this article is to advocate perspectives to strengthen existing healthcare systems to prioritize maternal health services amidst and beyond the COVID-19 pandemic in low- and middle income countries. COVID-19 directly affects pregnant women causing more severe disease and adverse pregnancy outcomes. The indirect effects due to the monumental COVID-19 response are much worse, increasing maternal and neonatal mortality.
COVID-19 quarantine-related mental health symptoms and their correlates among mothers: a cross sectional study

AUTHOR(S)
Somaya H. Malkawi; Khader Almhdawi; Alaa F. Jaber (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Maternal and Child Health Journal
One of the strictest quarantines worldwide to limit the spread of coronavirus was enforced in Jordan during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study investigated reported mental health and changes in lifestyle practices among Jordanian mothers during COVID-19 quarantine. The specifc objectives included studying the level of depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms and their potential statistical associations with demographic and lifestyle variables. Furthermore, the study aimed to investigate differences in mental health between different demographic and socio-economic groups and to examine the major lifestyle changes that occurred on mothers during the quarantine.
Birth and infant outcomes following laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy

AUTHOR(S)
Kate R. Woodworth; Emily O’Malley Olsen; Varsha Neelam (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

Pregnant women with SARS-CoV-2 infection are at increased risk for severe illness compared with nonpregnant women. Adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preterm birth and pregnancy loss have been reported. Among 3,912 infants with known gestational age born to women with SARS-CoV-2 infection, 12.9% were preterm (<37 weeks), higher than a national estimate of 10.2%. Among 610 (21.3%) infants with testing results, 2.6% had positive SARS-CoV-2 results, primarily those born to women with infection at delivery. These findings can inform clinical practice, public health practice, and policy. It is important that providers counsel pregnant women on measures to prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Omics study reveals abnormal alterations of breastmilk proteins and metabolites in puerperant women with COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Yin Zhao; You Shang; Yujie Ren (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Pediatric Research
The nutrition contents of breastmilk directly participate in neonatal immune response. The alternations of the components of breastmilk under the context of viral infection not only reflect the physiological changes in mothers but also affect neonatal immunity and metabolism via breastfeeding. Herein, this paper attempts to answer the important questions whether breastmilk production is affected by COVID-19 and whether breastfeeding is still a safe or recommended operation for COVID-19 puerperant women.
Why COVID-19 strengthens the case for a dedicated financing mechanism to scale up innovation in women's, children's, and adolescents' health

AUTHOR(S)
Flavia Bustreo; Mario Merialdi; Rachael Hinton (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: The Lancet Global Health
The disruptive effects of pandemics on the delivery of health services is increasingly recognised as a global threat to maternal and child health. The COVID-19 pandemic has further highlighted the need to not only rapidly develop health-care innovations but to also make them equitably available. In this context, innovations that contribute to maintaining coverage of essential interventions, such as by facilitating task shifting, simplifying service delivery, or both, are crucial. Therefore, this paper argues that the case for a dedicated financing mechanism for scaling up innovations in women's, children's, and adolescents' health is stronger than ever.
Favorable outcomes among neonates not separated from their symptomatic SARS-CoV-2-infected mothers

AUTHOR(S)
Antoine Martenot; Imad Labbassi; Amélie Delfils-Stern (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Pediatric Research
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), resulting from infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), can affect pregnant women. Their newborns are at a higher risk of prematurity and early separation from their mothers, who may subsequently require intensive care for their own health. Although neonates born of mothers infected with SARS-CoV-2 during pregnancy are seemingly vulnerable to infection, studies have found that they were not at a high risk for severe infection and were very rarely affected by COVID-19. The presence of virus by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) has been reported in newborns before H 12 of life. In addition, antiviral immunoglobulin M has been detected in newborns at birth, suggesting that mother-to-infant viral transmission may occur. To date, however, only one case of vertical transmission has been clearly demonstrated. In several cases of early neonatal infection, postnatal contamination cannot be excluded. Moreover, only one case report found that the virus could pass from mother to infant through the mother’s breast milk.
Maternal and newborn care during the COVID-19 pandemic in Kenya: re-contextualizing the community midwifery model

AUTHOR(S)
Rachel Wangari Kimani; Rose Maina; Constance Shumba (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Human Resources for Health
Peripartum deaths remain significantly high in low- and middle-income countries, including Kenya. The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted essential services, which could lead to an increase in maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity. Furthermore, the lockdowns, curfews, and increased risk for contracting COVID-19 may affect how women access health facilities. SARS-CoV-2 is a novel coronavirus that requires a community-centred response, not just hospital-based interventions. In this prolonged health crisis, pregnant women deserve a safe and humanised birth that prioritises the physical and emotional safety of the mother and the baby. There is an urgent need for innovative strategies to prevent the deterioration of maternal and child outcomes in an already strained health system. 
Impact of COVID-19 mitigation measures on the incidence of preterm birth: a national quasi-experimental study

AUTHOR(S)
Jasper V. Been; Lizbeth Burgos Ochoa; Loes C. M. Bertens (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: The Lancet Public Health
Preterm birth is the leading cause of child mortality globally, with many survivors experiencing long-term adverse consequences. Preliminary evidence suggests that numbers of preterm births greatly reduced following implementation of policy measures aimed at mitigating the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. This study examines the impact of the COVID-19 mitigation measures implemented in the Netherlands on the incidence of preterm birth through a national quasi-experimental difference-in-regression-discontinuity approach.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 5 | Issue: 11 | No. of pages: 604-611 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child mortality, maternal and child health, pregnancy | Countries: Netherlands
Possible vertical transmission and antibodies against SARS‐CoV‐2 among infants born to mothers with COVID‐19: a living systematic review

AUTHOR(S)
George M. Bwire; Belinda J. Njiro; Dorkasi L. Mwakawanga (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Medical Virology
Current evidence suggests that coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19), caused by severe respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS‐CoV‐2), is predominantly transmitted from human‐to‐human. However, evidence on vertical transmission and natural passive immunity among the newborns exposed to COVID‐19 is scanty and varies. This poses a challenge on preventive interventions for the newborns. A systematic review was conducted to first, determine the likelihood of vertical transmission among COVID‐19 exposed infants and second, determine whether antibodies against SARS‐CoV‐2 were generated among COVID‐19 vertically exposed but negative infants. This review registered in PROSPERO searched evidence from PubMed/MEDLINE and Google Scholar, among others.
COVID-19 in pregnancy: the foetal perspective: a systematic review

AUTHOR(S)
Rajani Dube; Subhranshu Sekhar Kar

Published: October 2020   Journal: BMJ Paediatrics Open
We aimed to conduct a systematic review of the available literature to determine the effects of confirmed cases of COVID-19 in pregnant women from the foetal perspective by estimation of mother to child transmission, perinatal outcome and possible teratogenicity.
The direct and indirect impact of SARS-CoV-2 infections on neonates: a series of 26 cases in Bangladesh

AUTHOR(S)
Senjuti Saha; A. N. Ahmed; Probir Kumar Sarkar (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal

The impact of SARS-CoV-2 on neonates remains largely unknown in low- and middle-income countries. We provide an epidemiologic and clinical report of SARS-CoV-2 infections in neonates hospitalized in Bangladesh.Outborn neonates admitted to Dhaka Shishu Hospital, a tertiary-care referral hospital, between 29 March and 1 July were screened for SARS-CoV-2. Their clinical data have been reviewed, including chest radiograph and laboratory reports, and SARS-CoV-2 genome sequencing has been conducted. Patients were followed-up for 27–75 days. A subset of caregivers was also tested.

Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 398-405 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: early childhood, maternal and child health, COVID-19 | Countries: Bangladesh
16 - 30 of 50

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.