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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1 - 15 of 112
A scoping review on psychosocial consequences of pandemics on parents and children: planning for today and the future

AUTHOR(S)
Rusan Lateef; Ramona Alaggia; Delphine Collin-Vézina

Published: April 2021   Journal: Children and Youth Services Review
The COVID-19 worldwide pandemic has forced individuals into an unnatural way of life. Families with children experience unique stressors, such as school closures, disrupted childcare arrangements, requirement of parents to uptake additional responsibilities such as homeschooling, possible financial strain, and lack of breathing space between family members. The adjustments required of parents and children during a pandemic presumably impacts the psychosocial wellbeing of parents and children in different ways. To better under the psychosocial consequences of pandemics on parents, children, and youth, this scoping review used Arksey and O'Malley (2005) five-stage framework to examine the existing research literature on Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), Influenza Type A virus (H1N1), and COVID-19 to answer the following two research questions: (1) What are the psychosocial consequences of pandemics on parents of children and youth? (2) What are the psychosocial consequences of pandemics on children and youth?
Addressing the clinical impact of COVID-19 on pediatric mental health

AUTHOR(S)
Nicole Bartek; Jessica L. Peck; Dawn Garzon (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of Pediatric Health Care
The novel coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic impacts the daily lives of families around the world. Sequelae are not limited to physical consequences of medical complications, but extend into social, emotional, spiritual, and psychological health. Interventions including mask wearing and physical distancing are intended to prevent viral spread but have an unintended negative effect on mental health and child development because of social isolation. Though it is too early to know the full impact of the pandemic on this generation of children, practicing pediatric clinicians are well positioned to help young people recover and thrive despite the challenges presented by the pandemic. The purpose of this article is to review emerging evidence on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health in children, and to discuss practical steps and interventions that can be used in primary care to foster resilience in youth and their families.
Review mental health and physical activity among children and adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Junko Okuyama; Shuji Seto; Yu Fukuda (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: The Tohoku Journal of Experimental Medicine
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is causing disruptions in the global social system. Japanese children and adolescents have had their schools closed, government-mandated activity restrictions imposed, and interactions outside the home reduced. These restrictions can have a considerable psychological impact on children and adolescents. This review aims to describe the impacts of COVID-19 pandemic on physical activity and psychological status of this population. The review was conducted by searching PubMed for information on the impact of COVID-19−related activity restrictions on children and adolescents.
The relationship between Korean adolescents’ sports participation, internal health locus of control, and wellness during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Dae-Jung Lee; Wi-Young So; Seung-Man Lee

Published: March 2021   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research Public Health
This study was aimed at providing practical information to improve Korean adolescents’ wellness by empirically identifying its correlation with sports participation and having an internal health locus of control (IHLC) during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study comprised both a pilot test and a main study.
2019-nCOV distress and depressive, anxiety and OCD-type, and eating disorder symptoms among postpartum and control women

AUTHOR(S)
Katherine A. Thompson; Anna M. Bardone‑Cone

Published: March 2021
This study compared postpartum and control women on depressive, anxiety, and OCD-type symptoms, and eating disorder symptoms during the 2019-nCOV pandemic and evaluated if associations between 2019-nCOV distress and these mental health symptoms differed for postpartum compared to control women. A community sample of women, ages 18–39, who had either given birth in the past 12 months (n = 232) or had no pregnancy history (n = 137; controls), was recruited to complete an online survey about their depressive, anxiety, OCD, and eating disorder symptoms. Postpartum women reported greater OCD-type symptoms related to concerns about both contamination and responsibility for harm (ps < .05) compared to controls.
COVID-19 and student well-being: stress and mental health during return-to-school

AUTHOR(S)
Kelly Dean Schwartz; Deinera Exner-Cortens; Carly A. McMorris (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Canadian Journal of School Psychology
Students have been multiply impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic: threats to their own and their family’s health, the closure of schools, and pivoting to online learning in March 2020, a long summer of physical distancing, and then the challenge of returning to school in fall 2020. As damaging as the physical health effects of a global pandemic are, much has been speculated about the “second wave” of mental health crises, particularly for school-aged children and adolescents. Yet, few studies have asked students about their experiences during the pandemic. The present study engaged with over two thousand (N = 2,310; 1,288 female; Mage = 14.5) 12- to 18-year-old Alberta students during their first few weeks of return-to-school in fall 2020.
Experiences with COVID-19 stressors and parents’ use of neglectful, harsh, and positive parenting practices in the Northeastern United States

AUTHOR(S)
Christian M. Connell; Michael J. Strambler

Published: March 2021   Journal: Child Maltreatment

This study aims to estimate household exposure to COVID-19 related stress and the association with parent report of neglectful, harsh, and positive discipline practices. Cross sectional survey data was collected from 2,068 parents in the Northeastern US. Parents reported personal and household experiences of COVID-19 stressors, their level of distress, and use of neglectful parenting and discipline practices for a randomly selected child in their home. Analyses estimated rates of COVID-19 related stress and parenting practices. Logistic regression was used to assess the relation of COVID-19 stress to parenting behaviors.

A recipe for madness: parenthood in the era of Covid‐19

AUTHOR(S)
Laurel Elder; Steven Greene

Published: March 2021   Journal: Social Science Quarterly

This article seeks to understand the economic, mental health, and political impacts on American parents in the era of Covid‐19. It draws on survey data from a diverse national sample collected in September 2020 and employs multivariate analysis to explore how Covid‐19 has uniquely affected the attitudes and life experiences of American parents.

Adverse perinatal outcomes predicted by prenatal maternal stress among U.S. women at the COVID-19 pandemic onset

AUTHOR(S)
Heidi Preis; Brittain Mahaffey; Susmita Pati (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Annals of Behavioral Medicine
High stress prenatally contributes to poor maternal and infant well-being. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has created substantial stress for pregnant women. This study aims to understand whether stress experienced by women pregnant at the beginning of the pandemic was associated with a greater prevalence of adverse perinatal outcomes
Adolescents’ symptoms of anxiety and depression before and during the Covid-19 outbreak: a prospective population-based study of teenagers in Norway

AUTHOR(S)
Gertrud Sofie Hafstad; Sjur Skjørshammer Sætren; Tore Wentzel-Larsena

Published: March 2021   Journal: The Lancet Regional Health - Europe
Lockdown policies related to the Sars-Cov-2 pandemic has potential negative consequences for mental health in youths. Anxiety and depressive symptoms were assessed in 3 572 adolescents, age 13 to 16 using the Hopkins Symptom Checklist (HSCL-10), in a representative longitudinal survey of Norwegian youths between February 2019 (T1) and June 2020 (T2). Predictors for symptom change were analysed with linear mixed-effects models.
Loneliness and problematic mobile phone use among adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic: the roles of escape motivation and self-control

AUTHOR(S)
Jiayu Li; Danni Zhan; Yuhong Zhou (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Addictive Behaviors
This cross-sectional study explored the relationship between loneliness and problematic mobile phone use among Chinese adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic, considering the effects of escape motivation and self-control. 1034 adolescents (mean age 15.76 ± 1.20 years) from China have been recruited. The results showed that loneliness was positively associated with escape motivation and adolescent problematic mobile phone use.
Socioeconomic inequality in child mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic: first evidence from China

AUTHOR(S)
Wen Li; Zijing Wang; Guanghai Wang (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Journal of Affective Disorders
There are increasing concerns that the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic will disproportionately affect socioeconomically disadvantaged children. However, there lacks empirical evidence on socio-economic inequalities in child mental health and associated factors.
Intervention of adolescent' mental health during the outbreak of COVID-19 using aerobic exercise combined with acceptance and commitment therapy

AUTHOR(S)
Wenxin Xu; Wei Shen; Shen Wang

Published: March 2021   Journal: Children and Youth Services Review

This study aims to explore the intervention effect of aerobic exercise in combination with acceptance and commitment therapy on mental health of adolescents during the outbreak of COVID-19 based on the theory of the dual-factor model of mental health. 1200 adolescents aged 12–19 in Fujian Province, China were screened by means of the dual-factor model of mental health from March to April 2020.

Study of parent’s satisfaction for online classes under lockdown due to COVID-19 in India

AUTHOR(S)
Itisha Sharma; Deepti Kiran

Published: March 2021   Journal: Journal of Statistics and Management Systems
The Coronavirus pandemic has severely impacted all the operations that demanded physical presence. In the process of encouraging social distancing, the didactic sector has also undergone huge transformation by shifting online. There has been an orbital shift in the instructional and pedagogical technology to keep pace with the current dynamic crisis. The teachers and administration of K-12 schools are working hard to ensure quality education to students but the major stakeholder who is the parent of the child might not be satisfied. Following an extensive literature review, we realized that there is limited research on parent satisfaction with respect to online classes by schools, especially in Indian context. Parents are the ultimate stakeholders and contributors to a child’s life and future, therefore understanding their level of contentment is paramount. The research aims at understanding the level of contentment of parents with online classes offered by schools to their wards during the corona pandemic lockdown in India.
Adolescents’ stress reactions in response to COVID-19 pandemic at the peak of the outbreak in Italy

AUTHOR(S)
Annalaura Nocentini; Benedetta Emanuela Palladino; Ersilia Menesini

Published: March 2021   Journal: Clinical Psychological Science
This study evaluated the variation on stress reactions in Italian adolescents during the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic as related to national diffusion of the outbreak, demographic characteristics, and personal experiences related to COVID-19. An online survey was disseminated from April 1 to April 5, 2020.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.