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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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106 - 120 of 127
Impact of social distancing on the mental health of parents and children in Qatar

AUTHOR(S)
Mohamed Abdelrahman; Duaa Al-Adwan; Youssef Hassan

Published: September 2020   Journal: The Vaccine
This study investigates the effects of COVID-19-related social distancing practices on parents and children’s mental health and explored the roles parental activities with children and coping strategies among families in Qatar. The path analysis shows that social distancing practices influence both parents’ and children’s mental health through parents’ activities with children and their coping strategies. Our findings reveal how living under stressful conditions such as COVID-19 could enhance the mental health of family members.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 33 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: child mental health, mental health, parent-child relationship | Countries: Qatar
Gender, work-family conflict and depressive symptoms during the COVID-19 among Quebec graduate students

AUTHOR(S)
Jaunathan Bilodeau; Nancy Beauregard; Amélie Quesnel-Vallée (et al.)

Published: September 2020
This study aims to document the gendered experience of the lockdown and its association with depressive symptoms among graduate students in Quebec. The policy measures taken after the COVID-19 were not gender- neutral. This study demonstrates the importance of taking gendered effects of policies into consideration, and points to mitigating actions that can forestall the exacerbation of gendered inequalities in mental health.
‘People won’t die due to the disease; they will die due to hunger’: exploring the impacts of covid-19 on Rohingya and Bangladeshi adolescents in Cox’s Bazar

AUTHOR(S)
Silvia Guglielmi; Jennifer Seager; Khadija Mitu (et al.)

Institution: Gender and Adolescence Global Evidence
Published: August 2020
In order to inform the Bangladeshi government’s response and that of its humanitarian and development partners in Cox’s Bazar, it is essential to supplement the existing evidence base with a focus on adolescent girls and boys, given the likelihood that containment measures will have multidimensional effects on young people’s well-being in the short and medium term. This policy brief draws on virtual research findings carried out with adolescent girls and boys in May and June 2020 and also presents priority policy and programming implications.
Factors affecting the anxiety levels of adolescents in home‐quarantine during COVID‐19 pandemic in Turkey

AUTHOR(S)
Senay Kılınçel; Oğuzhan Kılınçel; Gürkan Muratdağı (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Asia-Pacific Psychiatry

The long‐term closing of schools and home‐quarantine during the COVID‐19 pandemic cause negative effects on the physical and mental health of young people. Studies evaluating the mental health of adolescents during the pandemic are limited in the literature. This study is aimed to determine the results of home‐quarantine measures taken for adolescents during the pandemic and the affecting factors.

Initial challenges of caregiving during COVID-19: caregiver burden, mental health, and the parent–child relationship

AUTHOR(S)
B. S. Russell; M. Hutchison; R. Tambling (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Child Psychiatry & Human Development volume
Research confirms that the mental health burdens following community-wide disasters are extensive, with pervasive impacts noted in individuals and families. It is clear that child disaster outcomes are worst among children of highly distressed caregivers, or those caregivers who experience their own negative mental health outcomes from the disaster. The current study used path analysis to examine concurrent patterns of parents’ (n = 420) experience from a national sample during the early months of the U.S. COVID-19 pandemic.
The effects of social deprivation on adolescent development and mental health

AUTHOR(S)
Amy Orben; Livia Tomova; Sarah-Jayne Blakemore

Published: August 2020   Journal: The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
Adolescence (the stage between 10 and 24 years) is a period of life characterised by heightened sensitivity to social stimuli and the increased need for peer interaction. The physical distancing measures mandated globally to contain the spread of COVID-19 are radically reducing adolescents' opportunities to engage in face-to-face social contact outside their household. This study describes, from an interdisciplinary viewpoint, how social deprivation in adolescence might have far-reaching consequences. Human studies have shown the importance of peer acceptance and peer influence in adolescence. Animal research has shown that social deprivation and isolation have unique effects on brain and behaviour in adolescence compared with other stages of life. However, the decrease in adolescent face-to-face contact might be less detrimental due to widespread access to digital forms of social interaction through technologies such as social media. The findings reviewed highlight how physical distancing might have a disproportionate effect on an age group for whom peer interaction is a vital aspect of development.
Worlds of Influence: Understanding What Shapes Child Well-being in Rich Countries

A new look at children from the world’s richest countries offers a mixed picture of their health, skills and happiness. For far too many, issues such as poverty, exclusion and pollution threaten their mental well-being, physical health and opportunities to develop skills. Even countries with good social, economic and environmental conditions are a long way from meeting the targets set in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Focused and accelerated action is needed if these goals are to be met.

The evidence from 41 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and European Union (EU) countries tells its own story: from children’s chances of survival, growth and protection, to whether they are learning and feel listened to, to whether their parents have the support and resources to give their children the best chance for a healthy, happy childhood. This report reveals children’s experiences against the backdrop of their country’s policies and social, educational, economic and environmental contexts.

Factors affecting the anxiety levels of adolescents in home-quarantine during COVID-19 pandemic in Turkey

AUTHOR(S)
Şenay Kılınçel; Oğuzhan Kılınçel; Gürkan Muratdağı

Published: August 2020   Journal: Asia-Pacific Psychiatry
This study was aimed to determine the results of home-quarantine measures taken for adolescents during the pandemic and the affecting factors. It was conducted as an online cross-sectional self-report questionnaire and included children aged between 12 and 18 years.
Material hardship and parenting stress among grandparent kinship providers during the COVID-19 pandemic: The mediating role of grandparents' mental health

AUTHOR(S)
Yanfeng Xua; Qi Wu; Sue E. Levkoff

Published: August 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect
 This study examined the relationship between material hardship and parenting stress among grandparent kinship providers, and assessed grandparents’ mental health as a potential mediator to this relationship during the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States.
Is the psychological impact of exposure to COVID-19 stronger in adolescents with pre-pandemic maltreatment experiences? A survey of rural Chinese adolescents

AUTHOR(S)
Jing Guo; Mingqi Fu; Danxia Liu

Published: August 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect
The aims were to examine whether exposure to COVID-19 predicts elevated levels of anxiety and post-traumatic stress symptoms and whether pre-pandemic maltreatment experiences exacerbate this impact on mental health in adolescents.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 10 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: adolescent well-being, mental health, psychological distress | Countries: China
Combating the dangers of sedentary activity on child and adolescent mental health during the time of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Vijay A. Mittal; Joseph Firth; David Kimhy

Published: August 2020   Journal: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Although the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, subsequent quarantine, and social distancing on physical activity has been covered extensively, there has been limited focus on the resulting sedentary behavior1 on existing and emerging psychopathology. This is particularly disconcerting regarding children and adolescents, who rely on the ability to play to meet developmental milestones and who require more exercise than adults.
Mental health in high school Students at the time of COVID-19: a student's perspective

AUTHOR(S)
Aditya Thakur

Published: August 2020   Journal: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
This paper highlights key issues and offers practical solutions to address the mental health of adolescents during COVID-19 pandemic, from a high school student's (HSS) perspective.
Psychological effects of COVID-19 pandemic on society and its reflections on education

AUTHOR(S)
Muhammed Akat; Kasım Karataş

Published: August 2020   Journal: Turkish Studies
In this study, the possible psychological effects of COVID-19 on children, youth, elderly people and healthcare staff were discussed in the light of theoretical information. In order to minimize negative psychological effects, some recommendations were presented.
Contextualising the link between adolescents’ use of digital technology and their mental health: a multi‐country study of time spent online and life satisfaction
Published: July 2020   Journal: The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry

Evidence on whether the amount of time children spend online affects their mental health is mixed. There may be both benefits and risks. Yet, almost all published research on this topic is from high‐income countries. This paper presents new findings across four countries of varying wealth.

We analyse data gathered through the Global Kids Online project from nationally representative samples of Internet‐using children aged 9 to 17 years in Bulgaria (n  = 1,000), Chile (n  = 1,000), Ghana (n  = 2,060) and the Philippines (n  = 1,873). Data was gathered on Internet usage on week and weekend days. Measures of absolute (comparable across countries) and relative (compared to other children within countries) time use were constructed. Mental health was measured by Cantril’s ladder (life satisfaction). The analysis also considers the relative explanatory power on variations in mental health of children’s relationships with family and friends. Analysis controlled for age, gender and family socioeconomic status.

In Bulgaria and Chile, higher‐frequency Internet use is weakly associated with lower life satisfaction. In Ghana and the Philippines, no such pattern was observed. There was no evidence that the relationship between frequency of Internet use and life satisfaction differed by gender. In all four countries, the quality of children’s close relationships showed a much stronger relationship with their life satisfaction than did time spent on the Internet.

Time spent on the Internet does not appear to be strongly linked to children’s life satisfaction, and results from one country should not be assumed to transfer to another. Improving the quality of children’s close relationships offers a more fruitful area for intervention than restricting their time online. Future research could consider a wider range of countries and links between the nature, rather than quantity, of Internet usage and mental health.

Psychological burden of quarantine in children and adolescents: A rapid systematic review and proposed solutions

AUTHOR(S)
Nazish Imran; Irum Aamer; Muhammad Imran Sharif (et al.)

Published: July 2020   Journal: Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences
As COVID-19 grips the world, many people are quarantined or isolated resulting in adverse consequences for the mental health of youth. This rapid review takes into account the impact of quarantine on mental health of children and adolescents, and proposes measures to improve psychological outcomes of isolation. Three electronic databases including PubMed, Scopus, and ISI Web of Science were searched. Two independent reviewers performed title and abstract screening followed by full-text screening. This review article included 10 studies. The seven studies before onset of COVID 19 about psychological impact of quarantine in children have reported isolation, social exclusion stigma and fear among the children. The most common diagnoses were acute stress disorder, adjustment disorder, grief, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Three studies during the COVID-19 pandemic reported restlessness, irritability, anxiety, clinginess and inattention with increased screen time in children during quarantine. These adverse consequences can be tackled through carefully formulated multilevel interventions.
106 - 120 of 127

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.