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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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31 - 45 of 58
Using mixed methods to identify the primary mental health problems and needs of children, adolescents, and their caregivers during the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Olivia Fitzpatrick; Amani Carson; John R. Weisz

Published: October 2020   Journal: Child Psychiatry and Human Development
Our understanding of child, adolescent, and caregiver mental health (MH) problems during the coronavirus pandemic, and which interventions are needed, may be advanced by consumer input. 133 general population caregivers reported top MH problems and needs for themselves and their children, using standardized and idiographic measures. Linear regression models have been applied to quantitative data and thematic analysis to qualitative data. Caregivers’ COVID-era depression and anxiety symptom means fell within the clinical range, as did their children’s MH symptoms. Caregiver reported child and adolescent symptoms were positively associated with number of children in the home. Caregiver and caregiver-reported child and adolescent symptoms were more pronounced in regions with more lenient COVID-19 restrictions. Among the kinds of help most urgently needed, MH services were ranked #1 for caregivers and adolescents, #2 for 6–12 year-olds, and #3 for 1–5 year-olds. Top problems identifed for each age group highlight pressing pandemic-related intervention targets.
Child and family outcomes following pandemics: a systematic review and recommendations on COVID-19 policies

AUTHOR(S)
Vanessa C. Fong; Grace Iarocci

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Pediatric Psychology
A systematic review of mental health outcomes and needs of children and families during past pandemics was conducted based on the PRISMA protocol. The objectives were to evaluate the quality of existing studies on this topic, determine what is known about mental health outcomes and needs of children and families, and provide recommendations for how COVID-19 policies can best support children and families.
UNICEF’s approach to mental health during COVID-19 in East Asia and the Pacific
Institution: *UNICEF
Published: October 2020
This brief presents a snapshot of the multisectoral and adaptive approaches of UNICEF across East Asia and the Pacific to mental health and psycho-social support during the COVID-19 response, that were undertaken in collaboration with government, civil society, development partners and young people’s networks.
Risk and protective factors for prospective changes in adolescent mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Natasha R. Magson; Justin Y. A. Freeman; Ronald M. Rapee (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Youth and Adolescence
The restrictions put in place to contain the COVID-19 virus have led to widespread social isolation, impacting mental health worldwide. These restrictions may be particularly difficult for adolescents, who rely heavily on their peer connections for emotional support. However, there has been no longitudinal research examining the psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic among adolescents. This study addresses this gap by investigating the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on adolescents mental health, and moderators of change, as well as assessing the factors perceived as causing the most distress.
Life conditions during COVID-19 lockdown and mental health in Spanish adolescents

AUTHOR(S)
Lourdes Ezpeleta; José Blas Navarro; Núria De la Osa (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Spanish children were locked down for 72 days due to COVID-19, causing severe disruption to their normal life. The threat posed by COVID-19 continues and clinicians, administrators, and families need to know the life conditions associated with more psychological problems to modify them and minimize their effect on mental health. The goal was to study the life conditions of adolescents during lockdown and their association with psychological problems. A total of 226 parents of 117 girls and 109 boys (mean age: 13.9; Standard deviation: 0.28) from the community that were participants in a longitudinal study answered an online questionnaire about life conditions during lockdown and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Stepwise regression analyses controlling by previous reports of SDQ were performed.
Implementing group parent training in telepsychology: lessons learned during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Jason M. Fogler; Sébastien Normand; Nicole O’Dea (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Pediatric Psychology
This article examines telepsychology delivery to meet families’ needs during the COVID-19 pandemic. The review describes how to use treatment fidelity as a guiding principle to orient adaptations for telepsychology, as well as preliminary findings and early lessons learned in the implementation.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 45 | Issue: 9 | No. of pages: 983–989 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: family assistance, mental health services, parents, psychological counselling, COVID-19 response
When adolescents are in school during COVID-19: coordination between school-based health centers and education is key

AUTHOR(S)
Sara Anderson; Simon Haeder; Kelli Caseman (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Adolescent Health
Schools and School-based Health Centers (SBHC) play complementary roles in adolescent’s lives. The intersection between health care, notably SBHCs, and education has never seemed as pronounced as during the COVID-19 pandemic. Amidst the rapidly changing landscapes for both education and healthcare lie ample opportunities for better alignment of strategies to ensure that, once children return to the classroom (whether in person or virtual), all have access to a comprehensive, culturally appropriate, affordable healthcare delivery systems. This study provides recommendations related to SBHCs that could benefit adolescent health during the return to school. 
High levels of stress due to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic among parents of children with and without chronic conditions across the USA

AUTHOR(S)
Miranda A. L. van Tilburg; Emily Edlynn; Marina Maddaloni (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Children
The COVID-19 pandemic has introduced unprecedented levels of stress for parents, especially those of children with chronic conditions. Mental health effects are expected to continue for months/years and preparation is needed to meet an increasing demand for mental health care.
Child and adolescent psychiatry telemedicine: a Singaporean experience born in Covid-19

AUTHOR(S)
Ngar Yee Poon; Shirley Pat Fong; Shirley Pat Fong

Published: October 2020   Journal: Asian Journal of Psychiatry
Singapore was one of the first Asian countries to be affected by the Covid-19 outbreak. The article shares the experience of a consultation liaison psychiatry service within the largest women and children’s hospital in Singapore. The adoption of telepsychiatry has enabled continuous provision of care whilst reducing unnecessary exposure to COVID-19. This clinical case demonstrates the clinical utility of the telemedicine service for youth mental healthcare during the pandemic. 
Mediating effects of parental stress on harsh parenting and parent-child relationship during Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic in Singapore

AUTHOR(S)
Gerard Chung; Paul Lanier; Peace Yuh Ju Wong

Published: September 2020   Journal: Journal of Family Violence
Because of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, “Circuit-breaker” safety distancing was implemented in Singapore from April to May 2020. Schools and workplaces were closed and parents had to balance telecommuting with parenting responsibilities. Coupled with the high degree of economic uncertainty and reduced social support, these circumstances are hypothesized to increase parenting stress. Based on the Parental Stress Model, this study aims to understand how parents’ perceived impact of COVID-19 increased harsh parenting and reduced parent-child relationship closeness through the mediating effects of parenting stress.
How mental health care should change as a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Carmen Moreno; Til Wykes; Silvana Galderisi (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: The Lancet Psychiatry
Despite the heterogeneity of worldwide health systems, efforts have been made to adapt the delivery of mental health care to the demands of COVID-19. Children mental health concerns have been addressed via the public mental health response and by adapting mental health services, mostly focusing on infection control, modifying access to diagnosis and treatment, ensuring continuity of care for mental health service users, and paying attention to new cases of mental ill health and populations at high risk of mental health problems. Sustainable adaptations of delivery systems for children mental health care should be developed by experts, clinicians, and service users, and should be specifically designed to mitigate disparities in health-care provision. Thorough and continuous assessment of health and service-use outcomes in mental health clinical practice will be crucial for defining which practices should be further developed and which discontinued.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 7 | Issue: 9 | No. of pages: 813-824 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: child mental health, mental health services, psychological distress, COVID-19 response
Alone with the kids: tele-medicine for children with special healthcare needs during COVID-19 emergency

AUTHOR(S)
Livio Provenzi; Serena Grumi; Renato Borgatti

Published: September 2020   Journal: Frontiers in Psychology
The COVID-19 pandemic is asking specialists in the field of child neuropsychiatry and rehabilitation to at least partially shift to tele-medicine programs. This unprecedented period of healthcare and socio-economic crisis can become an opportunity. Indeed, by improving our ability to use innovative technologies to respond to the special healthcare needs of children with disability and their families, we may proceed forward to build more inclusive societies and smarter healthcare systems.
Anxiety in older adolescents at the time of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Pietro Smirni; Gioacchino Lavanco; Daniela Smirni

Published: September 2020   Journal: Journal of Clinical Medicine
The current study investigated the state of anxiety and emotional awareness in a sample of healthy older adolescents, 84 females and 64 males, aged 17 to 19, during the pandemic lockdown, using the Self-Rating Anxiety Scale and the Italian Emotion Awareness Questionnaire. An unexpected anxious phenomenology was found, affecting anxiety and the ideo-affective domain, while somatic symptomatology appeared to be less severe. The highest anxiety symptoms were breathing difficulties. These findings supported the hypothesis that the COVID-19 pandemic may be a risk condition for an increased state of anxiety in older adolescents and suggested the need to provide (1) an effective, empathic communication system with direct participation of older adolescents, (2) a psychological counseling service for the stress management of adolescents.
Adapting an emotional regulation and social communication skills group programme to teletherapy, in response to the Covid-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Deirdre MacEvilly; Geraldine Brosnan

Published: September 2020   Journal: Irish Journal of Psychological Medicine
The Covid-19 pandemic created an unprecedented situation whereby essential services within child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) were suspended. This created a need to modify regular methods of treatment at a rapid pace, to avoid cessation of clinical intervention and prevent potential regression in mental health. Eighteen children with moderate-severe mental health disorders and their parents were attending weekly group cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) based sessions (‘The Secret Agent Society’ (SAS) programme) when the Irish Department of Health suspended face-to-face intervention. This report describes how the group sessions were adapted to individualized, online therapeutic triads between each child, his/her parent and their clinician. Whilst internet technology has emerged as a promising solution to shortfalls in therapy services, in-depth exploration is needed to confirm the efficacy of telehealth for children attending CAMHS.
A mixed-method study of individual, couple, and parental functioning during the state-regulated COVID-19 lockdown in Spain

AUTHOR(S)
Cristina Günther-Bel; Anna Vilaregut; Eduard Carratala (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Family Process
This study explored the individual and relational well-being of people confined together with their partners and/or children during the first 3 weeks of state-regulated lockdown during the recent COVID-19 outbreak in Spain.  Although correlates of psychological distress (e.g., unemployment, perceived economic risk) were relatively stable across subgroups, predictors of relationship functioning varied substantially with household/parental status (e.g., telecommuting and employment facilitated conjugal functioning only for couples with children).
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 59 | Issue: 3 | No. of pages: 1060-1079 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: mental health services, parent-child relationship, psychological distress, COVID-19 response, lockdown | Countries: Spain
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.