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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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46 - 58 of 58
The first COVID-19 infanticide-suicide case: financial crisis and fear of COVID-19 infection are the causative factors

AUTHOR(S)
Mohammed A. Mamun; A.K.M. Israfil Bhuiyan; Md. Dilshad Manzar

Published: September 2020   Journal: Asian Journal of Psychiatry
The global suicide occurrences have been aggravated because of COVID-19 crisis-related issues such as fear of infection, the financial crisis, being infected with COVID-19, loneliness, social boycott, etc. Although two studies reported about the seven dyadic suicidality cases (i.e., suicide pacts), child homicide-suicide has not been studied.
A plea for the sustained implementation of digital interventions for young people with mental health problems in the light of the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Michael Kaess; Markus Moessner; Julian Koenig (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic and the consequent global lockdown posed a particular challenge for youths with mental health problems. Crucial interference with their everyday lives likely increased psychological distress while accessibility of conventional mental health care was limited. Ongoing online trials offer a unique opportunity to analyse mental health status and help-seeking behaviour of adolescents during the pandemic.
Effect of the COVID‐19 pandemic on the mental health of carers of people with intellectual disabilities

AUTHOR(S)
Paul Willner; John Rose; Biza Stenfert Kroese

Published: September 2020   Journal: Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities
The measures implemented to manage the COVID-19 pandemic have been shown to impair mental health. This problem is likely to be exacerbated for carers. The greater mental health needs of carers in the context of lesser social support raises serious concerns. We consider the policy implications of these  findings.
Telemental health for child trauma treatment during and post-COVID-19: limitations and considerations

AUTHOR(S)
Nicole Racine; Cailey Hartwick; Delphine Collin-V´ezina (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect
The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has led to unprecedented disruptions and stress in the lives of children and families internationally. Heightened family stress and turmoil can increase risk for, and exacerbate, child maltreatment. As a result, child maltreatment experts are concerned that there will be an influx of children requiring trauma assessment and treatment during and after COVID-19. As physical distancing measures have been implemented and will likely persist into 2021, organizations providing trauma treatment to children and their families have had to rapidly pivot to telemental health to maintain service delivery with clients. While the benefits of telemental health have been identified, including reduced barriers to access, increased cost effectiveness, and broad availability of services, there are unique limitations to its implementation within a child maltreatment population, such as challenges with attention and emotion regulation skills, difficulties identifying dissociative symptoms, and increased time with perpetrators of abuse due to shelter in place orders. These limitations are exacerbated for children and families who are most marginalized and facing the highest levels of social and economic barriers. Lack of access to reliable technology, lack of a private or confidential space for sessions, and reluctance to process trauma in the absence of a safe environment, are all barriers to conducting effective trauma treatment over telemental health. This article discusses both the benefits and barriers to telemental health in a child maltreatment population and offers considerations for child trauma service provision, program development, and policy during and post the COVID-19 pandemic.
Shifting from survival to supporting resilience in children and families in the COVID-19 pandemic: lessons for informing U.S. mental health priorities

AUTHOR(S)
Abigail M. Stark; Allison E. White; Nancy S. Rotter (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Psychological trauma : theory, research, practice and policy
This commentary contextualizes potential mental health outcomes for children during and after the COVID-19 pandemic within the risk and resilience literature. Individual, familial, and community-level factors that may increase risk for mental health challenges for children as well as factors associated with positive adaptation in the face of adversity are considered.
Cite this research | Vol.: 12 | Issue: s1 | No. of pages: s133-135 | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: child mental health, family welfare, mental health services, resiliency | Countries: United States
Managing psychological distress in children and adolescents following the COVID-19 epidemic: a cooperative approach

AUTHOR(S)
Xiao Zhou

Published: August 2020   Journal: Psychological trauma : theory, research, practice and policy
Children and adolescents are susceptible to the 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) epidemic and tend to show posttraumatic distress. Immediately after an epidemic, governments and social organizations often provide psychological services for children and adolescents to relieve their distress. However, many adolescents report distress even long after a traumatic event because of the unaddressed traumatic atmosphere in schools or families. To advance this issue, this article proposes a cooperative model of psychological services provision for children and adolescents in response to the COVID-19 epidemic.
Children and adolescents are susceptible to the 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) epidemic and tend
to show posttraumatic distress. Immediately after an epidemic, governments and social organizations
often provide psychological services for children and adolescents to relieve their distress. However, many
adolescents report distress even long after a traumatic event because of the unaddressed traumatic
atmosphere in schools or families. To advance this issue, this article proposes a cooperative model of
psychological services provision for children and adolescents in response to the COVID-19 epidemic
Children and adolescents are susceptible to the 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) epidemic and tend
to show posttraumatic distress. Immediately after an epidemic, governments and social organizations
often provide psychological services for children and adolescents to relieve their distress. However, many
adolescents report distress even long after a traumatic event because of the unaddressed traumatic
atmosphere in schools or families. To advance this issue, this article proposes a cooperative model of
psychological services provision for children and adolescents in response to the COVID-19 epidemic
School-based health centers during academic disruption: Challenges and opportunity in urban mental health

AUTHOR(S)
Leonell Torres-Pagán; Angelica Terepka

Published: August 2020   Journal: Psychological Trauma : Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy
School based health centers (SBHC) provide healthcare services to youth and their families. In response to the global health crisis from COVID-19, schools’ closures have impacted the access to vital services during times of increased need for physical and mental healthcare. Youth of minority racial and ethnic backgrounds living in urban settings face compounding factors including adverse childhood events, economic disadvantages, and barriers to healthcare. The mental health response of SBHCs in New York City as it relates to population specific factors such as family supports, economic considerations, and healthcare correlates is explored. The role of school based health centers and recommendations for interventions addressing mental health concerns in youth during COVID-19 are discussed.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 12 | Issue: 1 | No. of pages: 276-278 | Language: English | Topics: Health, Mental Health | Tags: health care facilities, mental health services, schools, COVID-19 response | Countries: United States
Youth mental health in the time of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
E. Power; S. Hughes; D. Cotter (et al.)

Published: July 2020   Journal: Irish Journal of Psychological Medicine

Youth mental health is a rapidly developing field with a focus on prevention, early identification, treatment innovation and service development. In this perspective piece, the effects of COVID-19 on young people’s mental health is discussed. The psychosocial effects of COVID-19 disproportionately affect young people. Both immediate and longer-term factors through which young people are affected include social isolation, changes to the delivery of therapeutic services and almost complete loss of all structured occupations (school, work and training) within this population group. Longer-term mechanisms include the effects of the predicted recession on young people’s mental health. Opportunities within this crisis exist for service providers to scale up telehealth and digital services that may benefit service provision for young people’s mental health in the future.


Handling children in COVID wards: a narrative experience and suggestions for providing psychological support

AUTHOR(S)
Swapnajeet Sahoo; Aseem Mehra; Vikas Suri (et al.)

Published: June 2020   Journal: Asian Journal of Psychiatry
Children cannot understand the need for isolation and hence, pose a clinical challenge in the COVID-19 ward. Some of these challenges are because of the environment of the COVID isolation wards, which are usually the makeshift wards or newly designed wards, which are isolated and far away from other ward areas, with restriction of movement.
Mental health burden for Chinese middle school students affected by the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Qiaohong Chen; Guohui Nie; Bin Yan (et al.)

Published: June 2020   Journal: Asian Journal of Psychiatry
From January 2020 to May 2020, the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused a huge impact on the Chinese people, especially young people in school.Starting from the end of February2020,many primary and middle school students were forced to take online courses at home due to long-term isolation.Because the college and high school entrance examination were particularly concerned in China, the pressure of preparing for the exams and the impact of the pandemic have brought a double psychological burden to the middle school students.
COVID-19 and the need for child and adolescent telepsychiatry services, a case report

AUTHOR(S)
Suravi Patra; Binod Kumar Patro

Published: June 2020   Journal: Asian Journal of Psychiatry
These two cases highlight the severe problems faced by caregivers of children with psychiatric illnesses in the backdrop of lockdown.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 54 | No. of pages: 2 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: mental health services, psychological distress, lockdown, teleworking | Countries: India
Mental health services for children in China during the COVID-19 pandemic: results of an expert-based national survey among child and adolescent psychiatric hospitals

AUTHOR(S)
Yonghua Cui; Ying Li; Yi Zheng

Institution: Chinese Society of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
Published: May 2020   Journal: European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry

With the outbreak of COVID-19, mental health care has attracted more attention, especially for children, begging several questions: how to provide mental health care to children diagnosed with COVID-19, how to take care of non-infected children during quarantine? How much has the COVID-19 pandemic affected mental health services in China and how to provide regular services to youths with mental disorders? To address these issues, the Chinese Society of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry conducted a survey on the situation of hospitals which provide mental health services for children in China; data were ascertained between March 20 and April 1. Moreover, experts’ suggestions for mental health care of children during the pandemic were also collected.


Psychosocial stress contagion in children and families during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Cindy H. Liu; Stacey N. Doan

Published: May 2020   Journal: Clinical Pediatrics
The COVID-19 (coronavirus disease-2019) pandemic has produced high and enduring levels of psychosocial stress for individuals and families across the world. This article tries to consider and address how current psychosocial stressors affect the health and well-being of children and their families.
46 - 58 of 58

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.