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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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16 - 30 of 276
Impact of the COVID‐19 pandemic on parent, child, and family functioning

AUTHOR(S)
Mark E. Feinberg; Jacqueline A. Mogle; Jin‐Kyung Lee (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Family Process
To quantify the impact of the COVID‐19 pandemic and public health interventions on parent and child mental health and family relationships, this study examined change in individual and family functioning in a sample of parents enrolled in a prevention trial; it examined change before the pandemic (2017–2019) when children were an average of 7 years old to the first months after the imposition of widespread public health interventions in the United States (2020) with paired t tests and HLM models.
Stress and coping among pregnant black women during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Jenna M. Wheeler; Dawn P. Misra; Carmen Giurgescu

Published: April 2021   Journal: Public Health Nursing

This study explored stress and coping among pregnant Black women prior to and during the COVID‐19 pandemic. It is a prospective, longitudinal, cohort study.

Impact of the coronavirus lockdown on older adolescents engaged in a school-based stress management program: changes in mental health, sleep, social support, and routines

AUTHOR(S)
Sara Schjølberg Marques; Ruth Braidwood

Published: April 2021   Journal: Children & Schools
The mental health effects of the coronavirus pandemic are likely to be significant and sustained, especially for those who experience adversity or preexisting mental health difficulties. This article examines the experiences of older adolescents during the United Kingdom government’s “lockdown” period (April 2020 to June 2020) on mental health, social support, sleep, and routines using both quantitative and qualitative methods.
Depression and anxiety in pregnancy during COVID-19: a rapid review and meta-analysis

AUTHOR(S)
Lianne M. Tomfohr-Madsen; Nicole Racine; Gerald F. Giesbrecht (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Psychiatry Research
The study rapidly reviewed and meta-analyzed the worldwide prevalence of depression and anxiety among pregnant women during the COVID-19 pandemic. A systematic search of the literature and meta-analyses were conducted from December 2019 – February 2021 with a total of 46 studies meeting inclusion criteria. Depression was assessed in 37 studies (N = 47,677), with a pooled prevalence of 25.6%. Anxiety was assessed in 34 studies (N = 42,773), with a pooled prevalence of 30.5%; moderation by time showed that prevalence of anxiety was higher in studies conducted later in the pandemic.
Parental perceptions of COVID-19–like illness in their children

AUTHOR(S)
A. Hodson; L. Woodland; L. E. Smith (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Public Health

The objective of the study is to explore parents' perceptions of COVID-19–like symptoms in their child and attitudes towards isolating from others in the household when unwell. The study used qualitative, semistructured interviews.

The mediating role of daytime sleepiness between problematic smartphone use and post-traumatic symptoms in COVID-19 home-refined adolescents

AUTHOR(S)
Tao Hu; Ying Wang; Ling Lin (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Children and Youth Services Review

COVID-19 was first recognized in late 2019 in China, at which time school closures forced most students to isolate at home or maintain social distance, both of which increased smartphone use, daytime sleepiness and post traumatic disorder (PTSD) risks. However, to date, no research has fully explored these behavioral risks or the consequences. Two thousand and ninety home-confined students from two Chinese high schools participated in an online-based questionnaire battery that assessed their sociodemographic characteristics, COVID-19 related exposures, daytime sleepiness, problematic smartphone use, and PTSD. The subsequent data were subjected to mediation analysis, and structural equation models (SEM) were employed to explore the variable relationships.

Development of a brief group CBT intervention to reduce COVID-19-related distress among school-age youth

AUTHOR(S)
Natalie Rodriguez-Quintana; Allison E. Meyer; Emily Bilek (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
School-aged youth have been significantly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. The effects of the pandemic will likely have long-standing effects on the well-being of youth, and access to mental health care is even more critical during this time. For the past 5 years, TRAILS (Transforming Research into Action to Improve the Lives of Students) has been working throughout the state to increase utilization of evidence-based mental health practices among K-12 school mental health professionals (SMHPs). By leveraging SMHPs who are widely accessible to students, TRAILS seeks to improve youth access to effective mental health care and reduce current mental health inequities. In March 2020, TRAILS responded to the COVID-19 pandemic by developing a group manual designed to be delivered virtually by SMHPs to help students develop effective coping skills to mitigate the impact of COVID-19.
A scoping review on psychosocial consequences of pandemics on parents and children: planning for today and the future

AUTHOR(S)
Rusan Lateef; Ramona Alaggia; Delphine Collin-Vézina

Published: April 2021   Journal: Children and Youth Services Review
The COVID-19 worldwide pandemic has forced individuals into an unnatural way of life. Families with children experience unique stressors, such as school closures, disrupted childcare arrangements, requirement of parents to uptake additional responsibilities such as homeschooling, possible financial strain, and lack of breathing space between family members. The adjustments required of parents and children during a pandemic presumably impacts the psychosocial wellbeing of parents and children in different ways. To better under the psychosocial consequences of pandemics on parents, children, and youth, this scoping review used Arksey and O'Malley (2005) five-stage framework to examine the existing research literature on Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), Influenza Type A virus (H1N1), and COVID-19 to answer the following two research questions: (1) What are the psychosocial consequences of pandemics on parents of children and youth? (2) What are the psychosocial consequences of pandemics on children and youth?
Cognitive reappraisal and self-compassion as emotion regulation strategies for parents during COVID-19: An online randomized controlled trial

AUTHOR(S)
Hanna Preuss; Klara Capito; Rahel Lea van Eickels (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Internet Interventions
Parenting during pandemic restrictions places extreme demands on everyday family life, leading to increased stress levels for parents and distressed parent-child interactions. This RCT aimed to investigate whether cognitive reappraisal and self-compassion are helpful emotion regulation (ER) strategies to reduce individual and parental stress during the COVID-19 pandemic. Method: An online intervention for parents was developed focusing on the application of ER strategies to pandemic requirements of families.
The rise of tele-mental health in perinatal settings

AUTHOR(S)
Pamela A. Geller; Navy Spiecker; Joanna C. M. Cole (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Seminars in Perinatology
This study discusses the use of tele-mental health in settings serving expectant parents in fetal care centers and parents with children receiving treatment in neonatal intensive care units within a pediatric institution. Its emphasis is on the dramatic rise of tele-mental health service delivery for this population in the wake of the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in the U.S., including relevant practice regulations, challenges and advantages associated with the transition to tele-mental health in these perinatal settings.
Promoting children's mental, emotional, and behavioral (MEB) health in all public systems, post-COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Kimberly Eaton Hoagwood; William Gardner; Kelly J. Kelleher

Published: April 2021   Journal: Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research
The COVID-19 pandemic exacerbates the mental, emotional, and behavioral (MEB) health problems of children and adolescents in the United States (U.S.). A collective and coordinated national economic and social reconstruction efort aimed at shoring up services to promote children’s MEB, like the Marshall Plan that helped rebuild Europe post-World War II, has been proposed to buttress against the expected retrenchment. The plan prioritizes children’s well-being as a social objective.
The relationships of parent- and child-related psychiatric conditions with oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder symptoms in children with ADHD

AUTHOR(S)
Ayhan Bilgiç; Necati Uzun; Ümit Işık (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Children's Health Care
This cross-sectional study evaluated the impacts of maternal and paternal affective temperament traits, maternal and paternal ADHD, depression and anxiety symptoms, parenting styles, child’s depression and anxiety disorder symptoms, and child’s autistic traits on the oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and conduct disorder (CD) symptoms of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Analysis showed a positive relation of maternal anxious and irritable temperament and child inattention, hyperactivity–impulsivity and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) scores on ODD scores.
The effects of the COVID‐19 pandemic on children's lifestyles and anxiety levels

AUTHOR(S)
Mürşide Zengin; Emriye Hilal Yayan; Elanur Vicnelioğlu (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing

This study was conducted to determine the effects of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) pandemic on children's lifestyles and anxiety levels. This study was designed as a descriptive, cross‐sectional online questionnaire survey.

Perceived family adaptability and cohesion and depressive symptoms: a comparison of adolescents and parents during COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Mengxue Li; Lili Li; Feng Wu (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of Affective Disorders

This study aimed to compare the differences of depressive symptoms and perceived family cohesion and adaptability between adolescents and parents during the pandemic; to explore the association between depressive symptoms and family cohesion and adaptability. A total of 8,940 adolescents (45.77% males; Mean age=15.31±0.018 years old) and their parents (24.34% males; Mean age=40.78±0.60 years old) from Shenyang, Liaoning Province, China, participated in the survey and completed several questionnaires online.

Mental health of children and adolescents amidst COVID-19 and past pandemics: a rapid systematic review

AUTHOR(S)
Salima Meherali; Neelam Punjani; Samantha Louie-Poon (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
The COVID‑19 pandemic and associated public health measures have disrupted the lives of people around the world. It is already evident that the direct and indirect psychological and social effects of the COVID‑19 pandemic are insidious and affect the mental health of young children and adolescents now and will in the future. The aim and objectives of this knowledge-synthesis study were to identify the impact of the pandemic on children’s and adolescent’s mental health and to evaluate the effectiveness of different interventions employed during previous and the current pandemic to promote children’s and adolescents’ mental health.
16 - 30 of 276

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.