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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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Pregnancy and birth outcomes after SARS-CoV-2 vaccination in pregnancy

AUTHOR(S)
Regan N. Theiler; Myra Wick; Ramila Mehta (et al.)

Published: August 2021   Journal: American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology
 SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy is associated with significant maternal morbidity and increased rates of preterm birth. For this reason, COVID-19 vaccine administration in pregnancy has been endorsed by multiple professional societies including ACOG and SMFM despite exclusion of pregnant women from initial clinical trials of vaccine safety and efficacy. However, to date little data exists regarding outcomes after COVID-19 vaccination of pregnant patients. A comprehensive vaccine registry was combined with a delivery database for an integrated healthcare system to create a delivery cohort including vaccinated patients. Maternal sociodemographic data were examined to identify factors associated with COVID-19 vaccination. Pregnancy and birth outcomes were analyzed, including a composite measure of maternal and neonatal pregnancy complications, the Adverse Outcome Index.
The toll of COVID-19 on African children: a descriptive analysis on the COVID-19-related morbidity and mortality among the pediatric population in Sub-Saharan Africale myopericarditis after vaccination with the Pfizer- BioNTech (BNT162b2) COVID-19 mR

AUTHOR(S)
Sabina Rodriguez Velásquez; Léa Jacques; Jyoti Dalal (et al.)

Published: July 2021   Journal: International Journal of Infectious Diseases

Few data on the COVID-19 epidemiological characteristics among the pediatric population in Africa exists. This paper examines the age and sex distribution of the morbidity and mortality rate in children with COVID-19 and compares it to the adult population within 15 Sub-Saharan African countries. A merge line listing dataset shared by countries within the Regional Office for Africa was analyzed. Patients diagnosed within 1 March and 1 September 2020 with confirmed positive RT-PCR test for SARS-CoV-2 were analyzed. Children's data were stratified into three age groups: 0-4 years, 5-11 years, and 12-17 years, while adults were combined. The cumulative incidence of cases, its medians, and 95% confidence intervals were calculated.

Pregnant in the United States in the COVID-19 pandemic: a collision of crises we cannot ignore

AUTHOR(S)
Pamela Stratton; Elena Gorodetsky; Janine Clayton

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of the National Medical Association

The COVID-19 pandemic and call for social justice is occurring when the United States, unlike its peer countries, has already experienced a steady 20-year rise in maternal morbidity and mortality with pregnant women today facing a 50 percent higher risk of mortality than their mothers.  Most vulnerable are women of color, black and American Indian/Alaska Native women, who have experienced longstanding disparities in access to and quality of healthcare and may begin pregnancy with hypertension, diabetes, and obesity, complications known to be more common in women enduring segregation. Initially, the race-related health disparities and resultant disproportionately higher rates of COVID-19 cases and mortality in indigenous communities and black, latins, or other communities of color were mistakenly considered innate racial differences. More recently, these higher rates have been attributed to underlying social, structural, and environmental determinants of health including resource inequities, inadequate housing, and occupational and environmental hazards that result in greater exposure to and less protection from COVID-19.

Children and adolescents with eating disorders during COVID‐19 confinement: difficulties and future challenges

AUTHOR(S)
Montserrat Graell; M. Goretti Morón-Nozaleda; Ricardo Camarneiro (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: European Eating Disorders Review
This study aims to present the adaptations to treatment protocols made in a child and adolescent eating disorders (ED) unit during the eight-week confinement period mandated in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and examine clinical and treatment variables in the outpatient, day hospital, and inpatient care programs.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 864-870 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, COVID-19 response, morbidity, nutritional diseases
Children and youth with diabetes are not at increased risk for hospitalization due to COVID‐19

AUTHOR(S)
Roque Cardona-Hernandez; Valentino Cherubini; Dario Iafusco (et al.)

Published: November 2020

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-Cov-2), responsible forthe coronavirus disease COVID-19, was first identified in Wuhan, China in December2019. Diabetes, as well as other cardiovascular comorbidities, has been recognized asa major risk factor for outcomes and mortality in adults with COVID-19, particularlyin the elderly with type 2 diabetes. Based on these conclusions, COVID-19 data onadults have been generalized to youth with diabetes. Nevertheless, experience frompediatric diabetes practices in China (Wuhan), Italy, Spain (Catalonia), and the UnitedStates (San Francisco Bay Area) consistently report only a single severe case ofCOVID-19 in a 20-year-old female youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) that was hospi-talized for bilateral pneumonia and was subsequently discharged without complications.


COVID-19 in children: should we be worried?

AUTHOR(S)
Candice Laverne Hendricks

Published: August 2020   Journal: South African Medical Journal
Reports indicate that children infected with SARS-CoV-2 have thus far presented with less severe disease than adults. Anxiety regarding a greater ability to transmit the virus is largely unfounded and has played a significant role in the decision to allow children to return to school. In some patients, however, especially in infants and in those with underlying comorbidities, severe disease must be anticipated and planned for accordingly. The most relevant severe clinical presentation in addition to the established respiratory complications, is that of a multisystem inflammatory disorder, with features resembling Kawasaki disease.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.