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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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Impact of COVID-19 pandemic on quality of life for children and adolescents with food allergy

AUTHOR(S)
Gang Chen; Audrey DunnGalvin; Dianne E. Campbell

Published: June 2021   Journal: Clinical & Experimental Allergy

The 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak has substantially impacted the daily lives of people. The isolation and quarantine measures may also have negatively impacted well-being in individuals with food allergy (FA), who may be more vulnerable in some areas than the general public. For example, food shortages and lock-down policies have required changes in food purchasing habits, potentially limiting food choices; furthermore, it is likely that COVID-19 prevented access to FA-related medical care. The difficulty of allergen avoidance and fear of accidental exposure affects health-related and FA-related quality of life (HRQL/FAQL). The exogenous shock of COVID-19 and resulting social isolation have imposed additional stressors. To date, there is limited published evidence on the impact of COVID-19 on HRQL/FAQL in this population. This study explored to what extent the COVID-19 pandemic influenced the subjective well-being of children and adolescents with FA in Australia.

Effects of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic and the policy response on childhood obesity risk factors: gender and sex differences and recommendations for research

AUTHOR(S)
Veronika Knebusch; Julianne Williams; Isabel Yordi Aguirre (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: Obesity Reviews
Childhood obesity is a public health concern globally, with generally higher prevalence rates in boys compared to girls. Although biological sex is an important determinant, gender roles and norms influence the exposure and vulnerability to risk factors for noncommunicable diseases. Norms and roles might be reinforced or change due to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) related measures as well as the exposure to risk factors for childhood obesity. COVID-19 related changes, such as home confinement, influence a child's risk of obesity. Using Dahlgren and Whitehead's model of the main determinants of health, this paper aims to provide a roadmap for future research on sex, gender, and childhood obesity during the time of COVID-19. It examines how COVID-19 has led to important changes in children's general socioeconomic, cultural, and environmental conditions, social and community networks, and individual lifestyle factors and how these may affect a child's risk for obesity. It focuses on the influence of gender and sex and outlines key considerations and indicators to examine in future studies concerned with promoting health and gender equity and equality.
Moving online: young people and parents’ experiences of adolescent eating disorder day programme treatment during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Phillipa Louise Brothwood; Julian Baudinet; Catherine S. Stewart (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: Journal of Eating Disorders

This study examined the experiences of young people and their parents who attended an intensive day treatment programme for eating disorders online during the global COVID-19 pandemic. Online questionnaires were completed by 14 adolescents (12–18 years) and their parents (n = 19). The questionnaires included a mixture of rating questions (Likert scale) and free text responses. Free text responses were analysed using reflexive thematic analysis.

Levels and trends in child malnutrition : UNICEF, WHO, World Bank Group Joint Child Malnutrition Estimates : key findings of the 2021 edition
Institution: *UNICEF, World Health Organization, The World Bank
Published: May 2021
The UNICEF, WHO and the World Bank inter-agency team update the joint global and regional estimates of malnutrition among children under 5 years of age each year. These estimates of prevalence and numbers affected for child stunting, overweight, wasting and severe wasting are derived for the global population as well as by regional groupings of United Nations (UN) regions and sub-regions, Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), UNICEF, WHO and World Bank regions, as well as World Bank country-income group classifications.
Impact of COVID-19 on child malnutrition, obesity in women and household food insecurity in underserved urban settlements in Sri Lanka: a prospective follow-up study

AUTHOR(S)
Renuka Jayatissa; Himali P . Herath; Amila G. Perera (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Public Health Nutrition

This study aims to determine changes and factors associated with child malnutrition, obesity in women and household food insecurity before and after the first wave of COVID-19 pandemic. In 2019, the baseline Urban Health and Nutrition Study 2019 (UHNS-2019) was conducted in 603 households, which were selected randomly from 30 clusters to represent underserved urban settlements in Colombo. In the present study, 35 % of households from the UHNS-2019 cohort were randomly selected for repeat interviews, 1 year after the baseline study and 6 months after COVID-19 pandemic in Sri Lanka. Height/length and weight of children and women were re-measured, household food insecurity was reassessed, and associated factors were gathered through interviewer-administered questionnaires. Differences in measurements at baseline and follow-up studies were compared.

Pregnant and hungry: Addressing food insecurity in pregnant women during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in the United States

AUTHOR(S)
Cara D. Dolin; Charlene C. Compher; Jinhee K. Oh (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology
Food insecurity is a major social determinant of health impacting more than 10% of Americans. Social determinants of health are increasingly recognized as a driving force of health inequities. It is well established that food insecurity leads to adverse health outcomes outside of pregnancy such as obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and mental health problems. However, little is known about the impact of food insecurity during pregnancy on maternal and neonatal outcomes. Food insecurity and other social determinants of health are rarely addressed as part of routine obstetric care. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has only exacerbated the crisis of food insecurity across the country, disproportionally affecting women as well as racial and ethnic minorities. Women's health providers should implement universal screening for maternal food insecurity and offer resources to women struggling to feed themselves and their families. Reducing maternal health inequities in the US includes recognizing and addressing food insecurity, along with other social determinants of health, and advocating for public policies that support and protect all women's right to healthy food during pregnancy.
A hidden side of the COVID-19 pandemic in children: the double burden of undernutrition and overnutrition

AUTHOR(S)
Boutaina Zemrani; Mario Gehri; Eric Masserey (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: International Journal for Equity in Health volume
The COVID-19 pandemic has deteriorated key determinants of health and caused major upheavals around the world. Children, although less directly affected by the virus, are paying a heavy price through the indirect effects of the crisis, including poor diet, mental health impact, social isolation, addiction to screens and lack of schooling and health care, particularly among vulnerable groups. This paper is aimed at discussing the potential impact of this pandemic on children’s nutrition and lifestyle. Preliminary data from the literature and from our survey show significant disruptions in nutrition and lifestyle habits of children. While undernutrition is expected to worsen in poor countries, obesity rates could increase in middle- and high-income countries especially among precarious groups widening the gap in health and social inequalities. The real impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on children extends well beyond that of a viral infection. This crisis has public health implications that could have life-long consequences on children. It requires effective and targeted measures mainly for vulnerable children and households to guarantee children’s basic rights for optimal nutrition, health and development.
Children and adolescents with eating disorders during COVID‐19 confinement: difficulties and future challenges

AUTHOR(S)
Montserrat Graell; M. Goretti Morón-Nozaleda; Ricardo Camarneiro (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: European Eating Disorders Review
This study aims to present the adaptations to treatment protocols made in a child and adolescent eating disorders (ED) unit during the eight-week confinement period mandated in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and examine clinical and treatment variables in the outpatient, day hospital, and inpatient care programs.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 864-870 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, COVID-19 response, morbidity, nutritional diseases
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.