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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1 - 15 of 76
Caregivers’ sources of information about immunization as predictors of delayed childhood vaccinations in Saudi Arabia during the COVID-19 pandemic: a cross-sectional questionnaire study

AUTHOR(S)
Leena R. Baghdadi; Marwah M. Hassounah; Afnan Younis (et al.)

Published: August 2021   Journal: Risk Management and Healthcare Policy
Of 628 women, 11.8% (n = 74) were pregnant at the time of survey. Most of the pregnant women (89.2%, n = 66) had some degree of concerns about their unborn babies getting infected during delivery in the hospital. Among mothers of children under 10 years of age (n = 564), half (n = 282) reported change in their children’s behavior during the lockdown. Most mothers and pregnant women (94.9%, n = 569) had some degree of psychological distress. Mothers and pregnant women with a college degree had significantly lower psychological distress (β = -1.346; p = 0.014) than women with a high school education or less. Similarly, mothers and pregnant women with monthly family income ≥ US$ 1,333 had lower psychological distress than those with < US$ 1,333. Women with pre-existing chronic physical (β = 2.424; p < 0.001) or mental (β = 4.733; p < 0.001) conditions had higher psychological distress than those without these conditions. Having children in the house was a contributory factor for higher psychological distress. For example, mothers with one child (β = 2.602; p = 0.007) had significantly higher psychological distress compared to expectant mothers without children in the house.
Exploring factors that influence children’s growth and development during a pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Kimiya Amjadi

Published: August 2021   Journal: Global Pediatric Health
The potential long-term impacts of natural or man-made disasters on children and adolescents have been the subject of numerous scientific research studies over the past decades. Since the rise of the COVID-19 pandemic, however, it has become even more important to continue these investigations in order to address the special needs of our youth. While the virus itself appears to cause less pathology in them compared to adults, the effects go beyond the disease itself. The pandemic has caused extremely high levels of stress for both the children and their families. As a result, special attention has to be given to the possible long-term impacts on their growth and development. It is very important for physicians and other healthcare providers to recognize the signs and symptoms of stress and monitor for physical and mental health inequities, and to be able to provide support when help is needed. Identifying culturally effective solutions and reaching out to community based organizations or partners for resources and programs with which families identify is an important part of this healing provision.
Rapid review protocol - Life in lockdown: child and adolescent mental health and well-being in the time of COVID-19
Institution: *UNICEF
Published: July 2021

While there has been a global rush to generate rapid evidence on COVID-19 mental health impacts among adults, limited evidence exists on the potential impacts on children. This is the protocol for our rapid review that seeks to (i) understand the immediate impact of COVID-19’s first wave on the mental health of children and adolescents (0–19 years); and (ii) apply lessons learned from this pandemic to mitigate the impacts of future health crises.

Mind matters: lessons from past crises for child and adolescent mental health during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Lorraine Sherr; Lucie Cluver; Mark Tomlinson (et al.)

Institution: *UNICEF
Published: July 2021
COVID-19 is a crisis like no other in modern times. It has reached every population and community. While the evidence base is still nascent, this report looks at the impacts of disasters and past epidemics – such as Ebola, HIV, SARS/MERS and Zika – on child and adolescent mental health and psychosocial wellbeing, and examines how these insights can guide policies and progammes to support children, their families and communities during the current pandemic.
A tale of two parts of Switzerland: regional differences in the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on parents

AUTHOR(S)
Michelle Seiler; Georg Staubli; Julia Hoeffe (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: BMC Public Health

This study aimed to document the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on regions within a European country. Parents arriving at two pediatric emergency departments (EDs) in North of Switzerland and two in South of Switzerland completed an online survey during the first peak of the pandemic (April–June 2020). They were asked to rate their concern about their children or themselves having COVID-19.

Sex differences in changes in BMI and blood pressure in Chinese school-aged children during the COVID-19 quarantine

AUTHOR(S)
Na Qiu; Hongmei He; Ling Qiao (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: International Journal of Obesity
There may be sex differences in BMI and blood pressure levels in school-age children, especially in the face of lifestyle changes. This study aimed to explore sex differences in changes in BMI and blood pressure in Chinese school-aged children during the COVID-19 quarantine. The cohort study of 445 school-aged children examined the change of BMI and blood pressure during the five-month quarantine. Multivariable Cox regression models were created to identify potential predictors of overweight, obesity, and elevated blood pressure (EBP).
Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus-2 infection (COVID-19) in pregnancy – an overview

AUTHOR(S)
Wafaa Ali Belail Hammad; Mariam Al Beloushi; Badreleden Ahmed (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology
The novel severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus-2 which causes COVID-19 disease results in severe morbidity and mortality especially in vulnerable groups. Pregnancy by virtue of its physiological and anatomical adaptations increases the risk of severe infections especially those of the respiratory tract. This single stranded RNA virus is transmitted by droplets as well as soiled fomites. There are various degrees of disease severity– asymptomatic, mild, moderate severe and critical. Most infections in pregnancy are asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic. For these women, the consequences on the mother or pregnancy are minimal unless they have additional risk factors such as diabetes, hypertension, cardiorespiratory disease, obesity or are of ethnic minority background.
Mental health of young people amidst COVID-19 pandemic in Bangladesh

AUTHOR(S)
Md. Abdullah Saeed Khan; Sourav Debnath; Md. Shahnoor Islam (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: Heliyon
The psychological burden of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak and lockdown strategy among young people not diagnosed with COVID-19 in the general population remains unknown and often have been overlooked. The objective of the study was to assess the prevalence and predictors of anxiety, depression and stress among young people diagnosed with COVID-19 of Bangladesh amidst the pandemic.
Parenting Under Pressure: a mixed-methods investigation of the impact of COVID-19 on family life

AUTHOR(S)
Kristen A. Chu; Chloe Schwartz; Emily Towner (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: Journal of Affective Disorders Reports

Development and implementation of effective family-based psychosocial intervention and treatment strategies during COVID-19 will require a detailed understanding of how the virus has impacted the lives of families. Written reports on the life impacts of COVID-19 for parents (n = 56) and their children (n = 43), and a questionnaire assessing parent positive and negative affect, were collected between April and May 2020. An inductive approach was used to identify themes in written reports, followed by statistical analysis to explore associations between themes and changes in parent positive and negative affect pre- and post-writing.

Bibliography of published COVID-19 in children literature

AUTHOR(S)
Philippa Anna Stilwell; Alasdair P. S. Munro; Emre Basatemur (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: Archives of Disease in Childhood

The COVID-19 pandemic is the biggest worldwide health challenge in this century. Research concerning the role of children in the spread of SARS-CoV-2, and investigating the clinical effects of infection in children, has been vital. This paper describes the publication trend for pertinent scientific literature relating to COVID-19 in children during the first 6 months of the pandemic. A comprehensive search of preprint and published literature was conducted daily across four databases (PubMed, Scopus, Ovid-Embase and MedRXiv) between 1 January 2020 and 30 June 2020. Titles and abstracts were screened against predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria.

Experiences of nurses caring for perinatal women and newborns during the COVID‐19 pandemic: A descriptive qualitative study

AUTHOR(S)
Hee Sun Kang; Yedong Son; Mi Ja Kim (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: Nursing Open

Nurses are pivotal in caring for patients infected with COVID-19. Little is known about experiences of nurses in maternity care during the pandemic. Therefore, this study aimed to describe nurses’ experiences of caring for perinatal women and newborns during the pandemic. A descriptive qualitative study was conducted. Data were collected from August–November 2020 using focus group and in-depth interviews. A total of 24 nurses working in maternity and newborn care units participated in the study. Content analysis method was used for data analysis.

Leave no one behind: COVID-19 and its impact on childcare and education in urban areas

AUTHOR(S)
Kutisha Ebron

Published: April 2021   Journal: Cities & Health
The United Nations Leave No One Behind, A Call-to-Action pledges and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals are the formulating structure of this article. The commitments are documents to offer structure on how to eliminate poverty for all global citizens. The article aims to highlight where our urban areas and cities across the globe need improvement by eradicating discriminatory practices that affect women and trickle down to childcare and education of their children to meet the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) the year 2030, amidst COVID-19.
An analysis of digital media data to understand parents concerns during the COVID-19 pandemic to enhance effective science communication

AUTHOR(S)
Alicia Torres; Claire Kelley; Sarah Kelley (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of Creative Communications
Science and health journalists have incorporated digital media as a source for their daily news production process, but little is known about the potential impacts of using digital media data to inform the news production process in the context of a global pandemic, where information is rapidly changing. During the COVID-19 pandemic, families have struggled to ensure economic stability and good health as well as their children’s learning and development. The Child Trends News Service sought to broaden access to science-based information to support families during the pandemic through television news, testing whether digital media can be used to understand parents’ concerns, misconceptions, and needs in real time. This article presents that digital media data can supplement traditional ways of conducting audience research and help tailor relevant content for families to garner an average of 90 million views per report.
Subjective wellbeing in parents during the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia

AUTHOR(S)
Elizabeth M. Westrupp; Mark A. Stokes; Matthew Fuller-Tyszkiewicz (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of Psychosomatic Research
This paper aimed to examine (1) the subjective wellbeing of Australian parents raising children and adolescents (0–18 years) during April 2020 ‘stage three’ COVID-19 restrictions, in comparison with parents assessed over 18-years prior to the pandemic; and (2) socio-demographic and COVID-19 predictors of subjective wellbeing during the pandemic.
Increased risk of rhinovirus infection in children during the coronavirus disease‐19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Emi Takashita; Chiharu Kawakami ; Tomoko Momoki (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses

Coronavirus disease (COVID‐19), which is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS‐CoV‐2), was first detected in Japan in January 2020 and has spread throughout the country. Previous studies have reported that viral interference among influenza virus, rhinovirus, and other respiratory viruses can affect viral infections at the host and population level. To investigate the impact of COVID‐19 on influenza and other respiratory virus infections, this study analyzed clinical specimens collected from 2244 patients in Japan with respiratory diseases between January 2018 and September 2020.

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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.