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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1 - 15 of 131
Comparing the initial impact of COVID-19 on burden and psychological distress among family caregivers of children with and without developmental disabilities

AUTHOR(S)
S. M. Chafouleas; E. A. Iovino

Published: April 2021   Journal: School Psychology
The current COVID-19 pandemic is presenting challenges for families, which may be exacerbated for caregivers of children with developmental disabilities (DDs; Center on the Developing Child, Stress, hope, and the role of science: Responding to the coronavirus pandemic, 2020). The purpose of this study was to explore caregiver burden and psychological distress among caregivers of children with DD as compared to caregivers of typically developing children across the United States as a result of COVID-19.
Homeschooling during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic: the role of students’ trait self-regulation and task attributes of daily learning tasks for students’ daily self-regulation

AUTHOR(S)
Friederike Blume; Andrea Schmidt; Andrea C. Kramer

Published: April 2021   Journal: Zeitschrift für Erziehungswissenschaft
As a means to counter the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, schools were closed throughout Germany between mid-March and end of April 2020. Schooling was translocated to the students’ homes where students were supposed to work on learning tasks provided by their teachers. Students’ self-regulation and attributes of the learning tasks may be assumed to have played important roles when adapting to this novel schooling situation. They may be predicted to have influenced students’ daily self-regulation and hence the independence with which they worked on learning tasks. The present work investigated the role of students’ trait self-regulation as well as task difficulty and task enjoyment for students’ daily independence from their parents in learning during the homeschooling period.
Longitudinal patterns of food insecurity, the home food environment, and parent feeding practices during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Elizabeth L. Adams; Laura J. Caccavale; Danyel Smith (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Obesiti Science and Practice

The economic impacts of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) have drastically increased food insecurity in the United States. Initial data, collected a few months into the pandemic, showed that families, particularly those experiencing food insecurity, reported detrimental changes to their home food environment and parent feeding practices, compared to before COVID‐19. This follow‐up study obtained longitudinal data from a sample of parents in the United States to quantify changes in food security status, the home food environment, and parent feeding practices, from before to across COVID‐19 as the pandemic continued to persist.

Postpartum during COVID‐19 pandemic: Portuguese mothers' mental health, mindful parenting, and mother–infant bonding

AUTHOR(S)
Daniela V. Fernandes; Maria C. Canavarro; Helena Moreira

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of Clinical Psychology

Millions of people worldwide have been diagnosed with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19), which has impacted maternal mental health and mother–infant relationships during the postpartum period. To explore how mothers' anxious and depressive symptoms, parenting stress, mindful parenting, and mother–infant bonding vary as a function of the moment of the baby's birth (pre‐COVID‐19 or post‐COVID‐19) and to examine the contribution of those variables to mother–infant bonding.

Impact of the COVID‐19 pandemic on parent, child, and family functioning

AUTHOR(S)
Mark E. Feinberg; Jacqueline A. Mogle; Jin‐Kyung Lee (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Family Process
To quantify the impact of the COVID‐19 pandemic and public health interventions on parent and child mental health and family relationships, this study examined change in individual and family functioning in a sample of parents enrolled in a prevention trial; it examined change before the pandemic (2017–2019) when children were an average of 7 years old to the first months after the imposition of widespread public health interventions in the United States (2020) with paired t tests and HLM models.
Study problems and depressive symptoms in adolescents during the COVID-19 outbreak: poor parent-child relationship as a vulnerability

AUTHOR(S)
Jingyi Wang; Hao Wang; Haijiang Lin (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Globalization and Health
Little is known about the prevalence of and risk factors for adolescent mental health problems during the COVID-19 outbreak. This paper aimed to investigate the prevalence of depressive symptoms, their association with study-relevant problems, and the moderating effect of parent-child relationship among Chinese adolescents during the school closures.
Parental perceptions of COVID-19–like illness in their children

AUTHOR(S)
A. Hodson; L. Woodland; L. E. Smith (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Public Health

The objective of the study is to explore parents' perceptions of COVID-19–like symptoms in their child and attitudes towards isolating from others in the household when unwell. The study used qualitative, semistructured interviews.

A scoping review on psychosocial consequences of pandemics on parents and children: planning for today and the future

AUTHOR(S)
Rusan Lateef; Ramona Alaggia; Delphine Collin-Vézina

Published: April 2021   Journal: Children and Youth Services Review
The COVID-19 worldwide pandemic has forced individuals into an unnatural way of life. Families with children experience unique stressors, such as school closures, disrupted childcare arrangements, requirement of parents to uptake additional responsibilities such as homeschooling, possible financial strain, and lack of breathing space between family members. The adjustments required of parents and children during a pandemic presumably impacts the psychosocial wellbeing of parents and children in different ways. To better under the psychosocial consequences of pandemics on parents, children, and youth, this scoping review used Arksey and O'Malley (2005) five-stage framework to examine the existing research literature on Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), Influenza Type A virus (H1N1), and COVID-19 to answer the following two research questions: (1) What are the psychosocial consequences of pandemics on parents of children and youth? (2) What are the psychosocial consequences of pandemics on children and youth?
Cognitive reappraisal and self-compassion as emotion regulation strategies for parents during COVID-19: An online randomized controlled trial

AUTHOR(S)
Hanna Preuss; Klara Capito; Rahel Lea van Eickels (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Internet Interventions
Parenting during pandemic restrictions places extreme demands on everyday family life, leading to increased stress levels for parents and distressed parent-child interactions. This RCT aimed to investigate whether cognitive reappraisal and self-compassion are helpful emotion regulation (ER) strategies to reduce individual and parental stress during the COVID-19 pandemic. Method: An online intervention for parents was developed focusing on the application of ER strategies to pandemic requirements of families.
Mothers’ and fathers’ parenting attitudes during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Lisa K. Forbes; Margaret R. Lamar; Megan Speciale (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Current Psychology
Attitudes about parenting are derived from early socialization of gender role norms and often include intensive parenting beliefs, which give mothers an outsized role in parenting. This study examined the differences in intensive parenting beliefs among cisgender mothers and fathers during the United States COVID-19 response. Data from a sample of 1048 mothers and fathers were collected during March and April 2020 to understand parenting beliefs. Results indicated that some demographic factors, including gender and ethnicity, impact intensive parenting beliefs. Additionally, the number of COVID-19 cases in a state, along with school closure length, was related to intensive parenting beliefs.
The relationships of parent- and child-related psychiatric conditions with oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder symptoms in children with ADHD

AUTHOR(S)
Ayhan Bilgiç; Necati Uzun; Ümit Işık (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Children's Health Care
This cross-sectional study evaluated the impacts of maternal and paternal affective temperament traits, maternal and paternal ADHD, depression and anxiety symptoms, parenting styles, child’s depression and anxiety disorder symptoms, and child’s autistic traits on the oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and conduct disorder (CD) symptoms of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Analysis showed a positive relation of maternal anxious and irritable temperament and child inattention, hyperactivity–impulsivity and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) scores on ODD scores.
The mediating role of social internet use on the correlation of parental efficacy, peer influence and social functioning of adolescents in the current era

AUTHOR(S)
Kehinde Lawrence

Published: April 2021   Journal: Current Research in Behavioral Sciences
The goal of this study was to examine the mediating role of social internet use on the correlation of parental efficacy, peer influence and social functioning of adolescents. Methodologically, data was collected from a sample of 496 adolescents (Male = 18.5%; Female = 81.5%, M age = 15.9), the idea that the relationship between parental efficacy, peer influence and social functioning of adolescents could be influenced by the mediating power of social internet use was tested.
Coping behaviors and psychological disturbances in youth affected by the COVID-19 health crisis

AUTHOR(S)
Mireia Orgilés; Alexandra Morales; Elisa Delvecchio (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Frontiers in Psychology
The COVID-19 pandemic and the quarantine undergone by children in many countries is a stressful situation about which little is known to date. Children and adolescents' behaviors to cope with home confinement may be associated with their emotional welfare. The objectives of this study were: (1) to examine the coping strategies used out by children and adolescents during the COVID-19 health crisis, (2) to analyze the differences in these behaviors in three countries, and (3) to examine the relationship between different coping modalities and adaptation.
Musical engagement and parent-child attachment in families with young children during the Covid-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Selena Steinberg; Talia Liu; Miriam D. Lense

Published: March 2021   Journal: Frontiers in Psychology
The onset of the Covid-19 pandemic has disrupted the lives of families in the United States and across the world, impacting parent mental health and stress, and in turn, the parent-child relationship. Music is a common parent-child activity and has been found to positively impact relationships, but little is known about music’s role in parentchild interactions during a pandemic. The current study utilized an online questionnaire to assess the use of music in the home of young children and their parents in the United States and Canada during Covid-19 and its relationship with parents’ affective attachment with their child.
A mixed methods research study of parental perception of physical activity and quality of life of children under home lock down in the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Gabriela López-Aymes; María de los Dolores Valadez; Elena Rodríguez-Naveiras (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Frontiers in Psychology
Household confinement due to the rapid spread of the pandemic caused by COVID-19 has brought very significant changes, such as the forced stay-at-home of children due to the closure of schools. This has meant drastic changes in the organization of daily life and restrictions on their activities, including exercise, which could affect the quality of life of the children due to its importance. In order to study the relationship between physical activity and psychological well-being of minors, a study has been carried out with Mixed Methods Research, combining survey methodology with transversal design with qualitative methodology using discourse analysis.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.