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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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Investigating the impact of covid-19 socialisation restrictions on children’s spiritual well-being: case studies from Poland and the UK

AUTHOR(S)
Krystyna Heland-Kurzak; Sarah Holmes

Published: August 2021   Journal: International Journal of Children's Spirituality
Parent and practitioners observations were examined to provide insights into the impact of covid-19 restrictions on children’s spiritual well-being, specifically related to reduced physical meeting of church communities in two case study contexts: Poland and the UK. Exploration of the four domains of spiritual wellbeing was carried out, with specific focus on how the abrupt changes in the communal domain may have impacted on other aspects of the child’s spiritual well-being. Significant variations in the response by churches during the pandemic were overlaid by disparate perceptions of the spiritual needs of children in these contexts. The extent to which these responses dovetailed with parental responsibilities and expectations of the church was considered alongside awareness of the changed nature of church’s activity with children during the pandemic.
Parental psychological distress and attitudes towards COVID-19 vaccination: a cross-sectional survey in Shenzhen, China

AUTHOR(S)
Yucheng Xu; Ruiyin Zhang; Zhifeng Zhou

Published: June 2021   Journal: Journal of Affective Disorders

Parental attitudes towards the vaccines play a key role in the success of the herd immunity for the COVID-19. Psychological health seems to be a controversial determinant of vaccine hesitancy and remains to be investigated. This study attempted to measure parental psychological distress, attitudes towards the COVID-19 vaccine, and to explore the potential associations. An online survey using convenience sampling method was conducted among parents within the school public health network of Shenzhen. Demographic information and attitudes towards COVID-19 vaccination were collected. The Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-4) was applied to measure psychological distress.

Parents’ willingness and attitudes concerning the COVID-19 vaccine: a cross-sectional study

AUTHOR(S)
Meltem Yılmaz; Mustafa Kursat Sahin (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: The International Journal of Clinical Practice

This study aimed to evaluate the parents’ willingness and attitudes concerning the COVID-19 vaccine. This cross-sectional study was performed using a self-administered online survey, covering parents’ and their children's characteristics, parents’ willingness and attitudes towards the COVID-19 vaccine. A total of 1035 parents participated.

COVID-19 restrictions: experiences of immigrant parents in Toronto

AUTHOR(S)
Sepali Guruge; Paula Lamaj; Charlotte Lee

Published: January 2021   Journal: AIMS Public Health
Parenting is a demanding undertaking, requiring continuous vigilance to ensure children's emotional, physical, and spiritual well-being. It has become even more challenging in the context of COVID-19 restrictions that have led to drastic changes in family life. Based on the results of a qualitative interpretive descriptive study that aimed to understand the experiences of immigrants living in apartment buildings in the Greater Toronto Area, Ontario, Canada, this paper reports the experiences of 50 immigrant parents. During the summer and fall of 2020, semi-structured interviews were conducted by phone or virtually, audio-recorded, then translated and transcribed. The transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis.
Mental health of parents of special needs children in China during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Sui-Qing Chen; Shu-Dan Chen; Xing-Kai Li (et al.)

Published: December 2020   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
This study assessed the mental health of parents (N = 1450, Mage = 40.76) of special needs children during the COVID-19 pandemic. An online survey comprising items on demographic data; two self-designed questionnaires (children’s behavioral problems/psychological demand of parents during COVID-19); and four standardized questionnaires, including the General Health Questionnaire, Perceived Social Support, Parenting Stress Index, and Neuroticism Extraversion Openness Five Factor Inventory were conducted. The results showed that there were significant differences among parents of children with different challenges.
Parental psychological distress associated with COVID-19 outbreak: a large-scale multicenter survey from Turkey

AUTHOR(S)
Alperen Bıkmazer; Muhammed Tayyib Kadak; Vahdet Görmez (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: International Journal of Social Psychiatry
Pandemics can cause substantial psychological distress; however, we do not know the impact of the COVID-19 related lockdown and mental health burden on the parents of school age children. This study aims to comparatively examine the COVID-19 related stress and psychological burden of the parents with different occupational, locational, and mental health status related backgrounds.
Parental burnout: moving the focus from children to parents

AUTHOR(S)
Moïra Mikolajczak; Isabelle Roskam

Published: October 2020
Parental burnout (PB)—a condition characterized by intense exhaustion related to parenting, emotional distancing from one's children, and a loss of parental fulfillment—has received increasing attention in recent years, even more since the worldwide COVID‐19 crisis and the confinement of parents with their children. This crisis put the spotlight on parents’ suffering, and the need to better understand parental burnout and how to best assess and treat it emerged as a priority. This brief article introduces the Thematic Issue of New Directions in Child and Adolescent Development focused on the measurement of parental burnout across various regions of the world. It briefly reviews the concept of parental burnout, its phenomenological experience, its etiology and consequences, and its measurement.
Parental Engagement in Children’s Learning: Insights for remote learning response during COVID-19

This research brief is one of a series that explores the impact of COVID-19 on education. It focuses on the potential parental role in learning and its association with foundational reading and numeracy skills. Fifty-three per cent of children in low- and middle-income countries cannot read and understand a simple text by the end of primary school age. In low-income countries, the learning crisis is even more acute, with the ‘learning poverty’ rate reaching 90 per cent. In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, 191 countries have implemented countrywide school closures, affecting 1.6 billion learners worldwide. In India alone, 320 million students from pre-primary to tertiary level are affected by school closures. In sub-Saharan Africa, 240 million are affected. With children currently not able to study in classrooms, the importance of learning at home is amplified and the task of supporting children’s learning has fallen on parents at a much larger rate. This is a significant burden, particularly for those who are also teleworking and those with limited schooling themselves.

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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.