search advanced search
UNICEF Innocenti
Office of Research-Innocenti
search menu

Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

RESULTS:   129     SORT BY:

ADVANCED SEARCH:

Select one or more filter options and click search below.

PUBLICATION DATE:
UNICEF Innocenti Publication
UNICEF Publication
Open Access
JOURNAL ACCESS FOR UNICEF STAFF CONTACT US
1 - 15 of 129
Parental stress of children with autism spectrum disorder during the Coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19): experience from Serbia.

AUTHOR(S)
Aleksandra Djuric-Zdravkovic; Mirjana Japundza-Milisavljevic; Dijana Perovic (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Fortschritte der Neurologie · Psychiatrie
Taking care of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), as of children with other developmental disorders, is associated with greater parental stress. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and impact of integrative and co-morbid ASD-related symptoms on parental stress levels during the COVID-19 pandemic at four time points. Testing was performed during significant changes related to the state of the COVID-19 pandemic in Serbia.
Parents of young infants report poor mental health and more insensitive parenting during the first Covid-19 lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Marion I. van den Heuvel; Stefania V. Vacaru; Myrthe G. B. M. Boekhorst (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth

The Covid-19 pandemic has put an unprecedented pressure on families with children. How parents were affected by the first Covid-19 lockdown during the early postpartum period, an already challenging period for many, is unknown. This study aims to investigate the associations between Covid-19 related stress, mental health, and insensitive parenting practices in mothers and fathers with young infants during the first Dutch Covid-19 lockdown. The Dutch Covid-19 and Perinatal Experiences (COPE-NL) study included 681 parents of infants between 0 and 6 months (572 mothers and 109 fathers). Parents filled out online questionnaires about Covid-19 related stress, mental health (i.e. anxiety and depressive symptoms), and insensitive parenting. Hierarchical regression models were used to analyze the data.

Mood, emotions, and behaviors of children during the COVID-19 pandemic in Autonomous City of Buenos Aires

AUTHOR(S)
Laura Cohen Arazi; Mariela García; Débora Berdecio Salvatierra (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Archivos argentinos de pediatría

Changes in daily routine and social fabric resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic had an effect on children and adolescents. The objective of this study was to know the mood, emotions, and behaviors of children and adolescents during the COVID-19 lockdown. This was a prospective, descriptive, cross-sectional study. Parents and/ or caregivers of children and adolescents aged 3-15 years in the Autonomous City of Buenos Aires were asked about their perceptions of the mood, behaviors, and emotions of children and adolescents during the lockdown.

Factors that differentiate COVID-19 vaccine intentions among Indiana parents: implications for targeted vaccine promotion

AUTHOR(S)
Katharine J. Head; Gregory D. Zimet; Constantin T. Yiannoutsos (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Preventive Medicine
Given low rates of uptake of the COVID-19 vaccine for children 12–17 and 5–11 years old, research is needed to understand parental behaviors and behavioral intentions related to COVID-19 vaccination for their children. In the state of Indiana, this study conducted a non-random, online survey of parents or caregivers (N = 10,266) about their COVID-19 vaccine intentions or behaviors, demographic characteristics, and potential motivating reasons for getting the vaccine.
Why do Hong Kong parents have low intention to vaccinate their children against COVID-19? testing health belief model and theory of planned behavior in a large-scale survey

AUTHOR(S)
Jian-Bin Li; Eva Yi Hung Lau; Derwin King Chung Chan

Published: April 2022   Journal: Vaccine
COVID-19 vaccines have been authorized for use in children in some societies. Parents’ intention to vaccinate their children is context-specific. Drawing upon health belief model (HBM) and theory of planned behavior (TPB), this study contributed to a timely topic by examining the extent to which parents intended to vaccinate their children and its associated factors in Hong Kong, where the government announced children as young as five could take COVID-19 vaccines starting from 21 January 2022. A large-scale, online survey was conducted among 11,141 Hong Kong parents (86% mothers) of children aged 5–12 (N = 14,468, 49.5% girls).
Distance learning challenges and prospects during Covid-19 in the context of adolescent education

AUTHOR(S)
Svetlana Rzanova; Alena Vobolevich; Svetlana Dmitrichenkova (et al.)

Published: March 2022   Journal: Social Work in Mental Health
The purpose of the study is to identify the challenges and prospects of distance education for adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic. The main research method was the survey. Teenagers, parents and teachers were interviewed (330 people). One of the leaders of the study was a representative of the Technical Institute of NEFU in Neryungri. The results of the study made it possible to identify and analyze the main inconveniences of distance learning that young people suffered from. The following difficulties were identified: different teaching approaches (48.2%), lack of technical devices (7.6%), an increase in the number of homework assignments (86%).
Parents’ psychological stress and their views of school success for deaf or hard-of-hearing children during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Sanyin Cheng; Shengli Cheng (et al.)

Published: February 2022   Journal: Communication Disorders Quarterly
This study mainly explored psychological stress due to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) among parents of deaf and hard-of-hearing children and how it related to parents’ views of school success in mainland China. The Psychological Stress Questionnaire and Views of Social and Academic Success were administered to 213 parents of deaf and hard-of-hearing children. Results showed that parents’ and children’s characteristics were related to psychological stress due to COVID-19, which significantly negatively predicted parents’ views of school success. The contributions, limitations, and implications of the present research are discussed.
Global, regional, and national minimum estimates of children affected by COVID-19-associated orphanhood and caregiver death, by age and family circumstance up to Oct 31, 2021: an updated modelling study

AUTHOR(S)
H. Juliette T. Unwin; Susan Hillis; Lucie Cluver (et al.)

Published: February 2022   Journal: The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health

In the 6 months following our estimates from March 1, 2020, to April 30, 2021, the proliferation of new coronavirus variants, updated mortality data, and disparities in vaccine access increased the amount of children experiencing COVID-19-associated orphanhood. To inform responses, this study aimed to model the increases in numbers of children affected by COVID-19-associated orphanhood and caregiver death, as well as the cumulative orphanhood age-group distribution and circumstance (maternal or paternal orphanhood). It used updated excess mortality and fertility data to model increases in minimum estimates of COVID-19-associated orphanhood and caregiver deaths from our original study period of March 1, 2020–April 30, 2021, to include the new period of May 1–Oct 31, 2021, for 21 countries.

Controlling the uncontrollable: stress, burnout, and parenting during a pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Amanda Joyce

Published: February 2022   Journal: The Family Journal
Throughout the COVID-19 outbreak, many parents have struggled to maintain work-life balance. This investigation examines contributors to and protective factors from parental stress during the pandemic. As expected, perceived stress increased with burnout and decreased with parental inhibitory control, mindfulness in parenting, and perceived competence. Interestingly, it showed no association with child age nor the number of children in the home. Similarly, it investigated parental well-being as a function of childcare during COVID.
Distress, anxiety, and its correlates among caregivers of children with kidney diseases during COVID-19 pandemic lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Rajni Sharma; Bikramjit Singh Jafra; Karalanglin Tiewsoh (et al.)

Published: January 2022   Journal: Archives de Pédiatrie

The COVID-19 pandemic has generated a significant amount of psychological burden in the form of stress, anxiety, uncertainty, depression, anger, and helplessness. The caregivers of children with chronic diseases in particular are at a higher risk of mental stress and burden. This online survey among caregivers of children with kidney diseases was conducted to assess the psychosocial impact of COVID-19. The psychosocial impact of COVID-19 pandemic on their mental health was assessed through standardized psychological scales (Peritraumatic Distress Inventory, Insomnia Severity Scale [ISI], Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale [DASS], and Positive and Negative Aspect Scale) and a semi-structured interview was conducted telephonically.

Parenting during a pandemic: predictors of parental burnout

AUTHOR(S)
Cara S. Swit; Rose Breen

Published: January 2022   Journal: Journal of Family Issues
The global pandemic, COVID-19, has resulted in significant changes in many aspects of our lives. For parents, the impact has been great as they combine work, family, and homeschooling while maintaining the wellbeing of themselves and their family. COVID-19 has brought about challenges that many parents have not faced before, putting them at risk for parental burnout. The goal of this study was to investigate risk and protective factors that predict parental burnout during COVID-19. Eighty-six parents (75 mothers; Mage = 40.73; SD = 7.88) living in New Zealand during COVID-19 lockdown participated in the survey.
The impact of a messaging intervention on parents’ school hesitancy during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Morgan S. Polikoff; Daniel Silver; Marshall Garland (et al.)

Published: January 2022
During the 2020-21 school year, families' access to--and desire to participate in--in-person schooling was highly stratified along racial and income lines. Research to date suggests that "school hesitancy" was driven by concerns about "fit" and safety, as well as simple access to in-person opportunities. In the context of a nationally-representative survey study, we tested the impact of targeted messaging on parents' reported willingness to send their children back for in-person learning in the 2021-22 school year. This study's results suggest that specific messages focused on either fit or safety issues outperform generic messages--they substantially increase the reported likelihood for previously-unsure parents to send their children back for in-person learning (while having no effect on parents who already reported they would or would not send their children back). The results have direct implications for education agencies seeking to address school hesitancy as the pandemic continues.
Parental mentalizing during a pandemic: use of mental-state language on parenting social media before and during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Tal Yatziv; Almog Simchon; Nicholas Manco (et al.)

Published: January 2022   Journal: Clinical Psychological Science
The COVID-19 pandemic has been a demanding caregiving context for parents, particularly during lockdowns. This study examined parental mentalization, parents’ proclivity to consider their own and their child’s mental states, during the pandemic, as manifested in mental-state language (MSL) on parenting social media. Parenting-related posts on Reddit from two time periods in the pandemic in 2020, March to April (lockdown) and July to August (postlockdown), were compared with time-matched control periods in 2019. MSL and self–other references were measured using text-analysis methods. Parental mentalization content decreased during the pandemic: Posts referred less to mental activities and to other people during the COVID-19 pandemic and showed decreased affective MSL, cognitive MSL, and self-references specifically during lockdown. Father-specific subreddits exhibited strongest declines in mentalization content, whereas mother-specific subreddits exhibited smaller changes. Implications on understanding associations between caregiving contexts and parental mentalization, gender differences, and the value of using social-media data to study parenting and mentalizing are discussed.
Italian same-sex parenting in times of COVID-19: constructing parenthood on insecure grounds

AUTHOR(S)
Salvatore Monaco

Published: January 2022   Journal: Family Relations

This article focuses on the challenges same-sex-parent families in Italy have faced in the context of the COVID-19 crisis. It is universally acknowledged that Italy was the first victim of the novel coronavirus in Europe. Due to the hazards caused by the pandemic, the Italian government implemented a series of countermeasures to help families, resolving the increasingly irreconcilable conflicts between work and childcare, providing financing to the most poverty-stricken families. However, some initiatives have made it clear that in Italy, not all people have received equal benefits. To further investigate and bring awareness to the issue of the vulnerability of Italian same-sex-parent families in times of COVID-19, 40 in-depth interviews were conducted online between March and June 2020 to collect data on attitudes, opinions, and behaviors at the individual level.

Psychosocial impact of 8 weeks COVID-19 quarantine on Italian parents and their children

AUTHOR(S)
Bassem J. Khoory; Maya W. Keuning; Anne C. Fledderus (et al.)

Published: January 2022   Journal: Maternal and Child Health Journal

Italy was affected greatly by Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), emerging mainly in the Italian province of Lombardy. This outbreak led to profound governmental interventions along with a strict quarantine. This quarantine may have psychosocial impact on children and parents in particular. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of 8 weeks COVID-19 quarantine on psychosocial functioning of Italian parents and their children. In this cross-sectional survey, we included parents and children resided in Italy during the 8 weeks COVID-19 quarantine. We evaluated social and emotional functioning, clinical symptoms possibly related to emotional distress, and change in perspectives using a questionnaire.

1 - 15 of 129

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE DATABASE

Read the latest quarterly digest on children and disabilities.

The second digest discussed children and violence during the pandemic.

The first digest covers children and youth mental health under COVID-19.

Subscribe to updates on new research about COVID-19 & children

SIGN UP TO OUR NEWSLETTER

Share:

facebook twitter linkedin google+ reddit print email
Campaign Campaign

COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.