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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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16 - 30 of 77
Safety of immunization during pregnancy: a review of the evidence: global advisory committee on vaccine safety
The Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) of WHO asked the Global Advisory Committee on Vaccine Safety (GACVS) to provide support to a review of evidence on the safety of vaccinations in pregnant and lactating women. This request related to uncertainties about the safety of vaccination – whether intended or inadvertent – of pregnant women during mass vaccination campaigns. Such evidence would be particularly important in situations where manufacturers do not recommend the vaccination of pregnant women on solely precautionary grounds. However, evidence related to this issue is limited, as pre-licensing clinical trials of vaccines do not usually include pregnant and lactating women. Reports available also provide limited post-licensing data, as once again, pregnant women are usually not included in clinical trials. This in turn has limited the ability to make evidence-based decisions and provide optimal guidance on the use of vaccines in this population.
Becoming a mother in the ‘new’ social world in Australia during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Linda Sweet; Zoe Bradfield; Vidanka Vasilevski (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Midwifery

Substantial public health measures occurred in Australian society during the COVID-19 pandemic to reduce the risk of community transmission. Little was known about the impact of these changes on childbearing women. To describe childbearing women's experiences of becoming a mother during the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia.

Decrease in admissions and change in the diagnostic landscape in a newborn care unit in Northern Ghana during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Alhassan Abdul-Mumin; Cesia Cotache-Condor; Kingsley Appiah Bimpong (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Frontiers in Pediatrics
The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has spread worldwide with an increasing number of patients, including pregnant women and neonates. This study aims to evaluate morbidity and mortality in the COVID-19 era compared to the preceding year in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at Tamale Teaching Hospital, Ghana. This is a cross-sectional study carried out on neonates admitted to NICU between March 1st to August 31st, 2019 (pre-COVID-19 era) and March 1st to August 31st, 2020 (COVID-19 era). Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify predictors of mortality for both periods.
Effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on maternal and perinatal outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis

AUTHOR(S)
Barbara Chmielewska; Imogen Barratt; Rosemary Townsend (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: The Lancet Global Health
The COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound impact on health-care systems and potentially on pregnancy outcomes, but no systematic synthesis of evidence of this effect has been undertaken. This study aimed to assess the collective evidence on the effects on maternal, fetal, and neonatal outcomes of the pandemic.
Obstetrical and newborn outcomes among patients with SARS-CoV-2 during pregnancy
Published: March 2021   Journal: JOGC : Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada
This is a report on the perinatal outcomes of pregnant patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) from 2 hospitals in Montréal, Québec. Outcomes of 45 patients with SARS-CoV-2 during pregnancy were compared with those of 225 patients without infection. Sixteen percent of patients with SARS-CoV-2 delivered preterm, compared with 9% of patients without (P = 0.28). Median gestational age at delivery (39.3 (interquartile range [IQR] 37.7–40.4) wk vs. 39.1 [IQR 38.3-40.1] wk) and median birthweight (3250 [IQR 2780-3530] g vs. 3340 [IQR 3025-3665] g) were similar between groups. The rate of cesarean delivery was 29% for patients with SARS-CoV-2. Therefore, we did not find important differences in outcomes associated with SARS-CoV-2. Our findings may be limited to women with mild COVID-19 diagnosed in the third trimester.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 43 | Issue: 4 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: COVID-19, hospitalization, maternal and child health, pregnancy, pregnant women | Countries: Canada
Social determinants of health and Coronavirus disease 2019 in pregnancy

AUTHOR(S)
Lakha Prasannan; Burton Rochelson; Weiwei Shan (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology
The social and physical environments in which people live affect the emergence, prevalence and severity of both infectious and non-infectious diseases. There is limited data on how such social determinants of health (SDH), including neighborhood socioeconomic conditions, affect the risk of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and severity of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) during pregnancy. This paper's objective was to determine how SDH are associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection and the severity of COVID-19 illness in hospitalized pregnant patients in New York during the global COVID-19 pandemic.
Pregnant women perspectives on SARS-COV-2 vaccine

AUTHOR(S)
Luigi Carbone; Ilenia Mappa; Angelo Sirico (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology
Since COVID-19 vaccines have been distributed, a debate has raised on whether pregnant women should get the vaccine. No available data exist so far regarding safety, efficacy and toxicology of these vaccines when administered during pregnancy. Most of the Obstetrics and Gynecology societies suggested that pregnant could agree to be vaccinated, after a thorough counseling of risks and benefits with their gynecologists, thus leading to an autonomous decision. The aim of this study was to evaluate the attitude to COVID-19 vaccination in pregnant and breastfeeding women in Italy.
A comprehensive analysis of maternal and newborn disease and related control for COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Nevio Cimolai

Published: March 2021   Journal: SN Comprehensive Clinical Medicine
The maternal-fetal/newborn unit is established at risk for COVID-19 infection. This narrative review summarizes the contemporary and cumulative publications which detail maternal infection, antenatal and newborn infections, and maternal/fetal/newborn management and prevention. There is a wide spectrum of maternal disease, but the potential for severe disease albeit in a minority is confirmed. COVID-19 carries risk for preterm delivery. Pregnant females can suffer multisystem disease, and co-morbidities play a significant role in risk. Congenital infection has been supported by several anecdotal reports, but strong confirmatory data are few. No typical congenital dysmorphisms are evident. Nevertheless, placental vascular compromise must be considered a risk for the fetus during advanced maternal infections. Clinical manifestations of newborn infection have been mild to moderate and relatively uncommon.
Management of comprehensive care of multiple-birth infants from fetal to infancy period: challenges, training, strategies

AUTHOR(S)
Tahereh Changiz; Mahboobeh Namnabati

Published: March 2021   Journal: BMC Pediatrics
Prematurity escalates the crisis of the infants a susceptible group of the society. Multiple delivery further intensifies the susceptibility of both family and health system. A comprehensive care is, thus, necessary to ensure the optimal growth and development of such multiple-births. Accompanied by trainings, challenges, and strategies, the present study was conducted based on a two-year report of comprehensive care management experience on two sets of multiple infants.
Pregnancy-related anxiety and its associated factors during COVID-19 pandemic in Iranian pregnant women: a web-based cross-sectional study

AUTHOR(S)
Zeinab Hamzehgardeshi; Shabnam Omidvar; Arman Asadi Amoli (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
Pregnancy is a risk factor for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Pregnant women suffer from varying levels of pregnancy-related anxiety (PRA) which can negatively affect pregnancy outcomes. The aim of this study was to assess PRA and its associated factors during the COVID-19 pandemic. This web-based cross-sectional study was conducted in 2020 on 318 pregnant women purposively recruited from primary healthcare centers in Sari and Amol, Iran.
Current trends and geographical differences in therapeutic profile and outcomes of COVID-19 among pregnant women - a systematic review and meta-analysis

AUTHOR(S)
Pallavi Dubey; Bhaskar Thakur; Sireesha Reddy (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Due to the lack of effective treatments for COVID-19, it becomes imperative to assess the geographical differences and trends in the current clinical care and outcomes of COVID-19 in pregnant women. A PubMed search was performed to screen articles reporting therapeutics and outcomes of confirmed COVID-19 in pregnant women prior to August 27, 2020. Searches, quality assessments of eligible studies, extracted and reported data were performed according to PRISMA guidelines. Meta-analyses and cumulative meta-analyses of proportions were performed for estimating each outcome and their pattern over time respectively.
Adverse perinatal outcomes predicted by prenatal maternal stress among U.S. women at the COVID-19 pandemic onset

AUTHOR(S)
Heidi Preis; Brittain Mahaffey; Susmita Pati (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Annals of Behavioral Medicine
High stress prenatally contributes to poor maternal and infant well-being. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has created substantial stress for pregnant women. This study aims to understand whether stress experienced by women pregnant at the beginning of the pandemic was associated with a greater prevalence of adverse perinatal outcomes
The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on pregnancy planning behaviors

AUTHOR(S)
Angela C. Flynn; Kimberley Kavanagh; Andrea D. Smith (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Womens Health Reports
Our understanding of how the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has impacted decision-making for women planning to conceive is unclear. This paper aimed to investigate how the COVID-19 pandemic has influenced pregnancy planning behaviors. An online questionnaire of closed- and open-ended questions was utilized to capture pregnancy planning behaviors and reported behavioral changes during the COVID-19 pandemic in women planning pregnancy between January and July 2020. Closed-ended questions were analyzed quantitatively, and thematic framework analysis was utilized for open-ended responses.
Future vaccinations in pregnancy

AUTHOR(S)
D. Vress

Published: March 2021   Journal: Best Practice & Research Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology

Vaccination in pregnancy provides an important opportunity to target illnesses that are known to impact particularly on pregnant women, fetal development and cause newborn illness. The ability to create antibodies via safe vaccination that cross the placenta can provide protection against maternal, congenital and newborn infection. There are currently multiple vaccines being developed which have direct benefits for pregnant women and their newborns. Group B Streptococcus, Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Cytomegalovirus, Zika, Ebola, Malaria and coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 are all being researched with the view to developing a safe vaccine available for pregnant women. There is also an increased movement towards including pregnant women in vaccine development and trials, challenging the historical, ethical and medicolegal arguments against their involvement in such research.

Outcomes of newborns to mothers with COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
K. Ghema; M. Lehlimi; H. Toumi (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Infectious Diseases Now

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has spread rapidly across the world. Given the sharply increased infection rate, the number of pregnant women and children with COVID-19 is correspondingly on the rise. SARS-CoV-2 infection is transmitted through droplets; though hypothesized, other transmission routes have not been confirmed. As of now, it remains unclear whether and how SARS-CoV-2 can possibly be transmitted from the mother to the fetus. This study examines the medical records of 30 neonates born to women with COVID-19, the objective being to provide documented information on maternal-child transmission and infant outcomes.

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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.