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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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301 - 315 of 338
Infant outcomes and maternal COVID-19 status at delivery

AUTHOR(S)
Kinga Zgutka; Kaninghat Prasanth; Shirley Pinero-Bernardo (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Physicians Weekly
This study aims to compare clinical characteristics and outcomes of infants born to COVID-19 to non COVID-19 mothers at delivery in a community hospital in Queens, New York. Case-control study conducted March 15 to June 15, 2020. Cases were infants born to mothers with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 infection at delivery. The infant of non COVID-19 mother born before and after each case were selected as controls.
Management and perspective of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), pregnancy, and hypercoagulability

AUTHOR(S)
Umair Nasir; Sarfraz Ahmad

Published: March 2021   Journal: SN comprehensive clinical medicine
The modern-day pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spread rapidly. There is limited data about the effects of the virus on pregnant women, even in women who were infected by other strains of coronavirus such as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). After reviewing numerous articles published in the peer-reviewed journals and other authentic sources, this mini-review evaluated various key clinical and laboratory aspects of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in relation to pregnancy.
Pandemic-related pregnancy stress assessment – psychometric properties of the Polish PREPS and its relationship with childbirth fear

AUTHOR(S)
Michalina Liska; Anna Kołodziej-Zaleska; Anna Brandt-Salmeri (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Midwifery

The aim of the study was to create and to validate the Polish version of the original English version of the Pandemic-Related Pregnancy Stress Scale (PREPS) developed by Preis and colleagues (2020a; 2020b) We additionally investigated the association of maternal obstetrical and pandemic related factors with the PREPS in order to test its sensitivity. A cross-sectional study design with nonrandom sampling was used. The sample consisted of a total of 1148 pregnant women in various trimesters. They were recruited via social media and completed an online study questionnaire in April-May 2020.

The effects of opioids on female fertility, pregnancy and the breastfeeding mother‐infant dyad: a review

AUTHOR(S)
Daniel J. Corsi; Malia S. Q. Murphy

Published: February 2021
Rates of opioid use and opioid agonist maintenance treatment have increased substantially in recent years, particularly among women. Trends and outcomes of opioids use on fertility, pregnancy and breastfeeding, and longer‐term child developmental outcomes have not been well‐described. This paper reviews the existing literature on the health effects of opioid use on female fertility, pregnancy, breastmilk and the exposed infant. It finds that the current literature is primarily concentrated on the impact of opioid use in pregnancy and neonatal outcomes, with little exploration of effects on fertility. Studies are limited in number, some with small sample sizes, and many are hampered by methodological challenges related to confounding and other potential biases. Opioid use is becoming more prevalent due to environmental pressures such as COVID‐19.
Rates of opioid use and opi-
oid agonist maintenance treatment have increased substantially in recent years, par-
ticularly among women. Trends and outcomes of opioids use on fertility, pregnancy
and breastfeeding, and longer- term child developmental outcomes have not been
well- described. Here, we review the existing literature on the health effects of opioid
use on female fertility, pregnancy, breastmilk and the exposed infant. We find that
the current literature is primarily concentrated on the impact of opioid use in preg-
nancy and neonatal outcomes, with little exploration of effects on fertility. Studies
are limited in number, some with small sample sizes, and many are hampered by
methodological challenges related to confounding and other potential biases. Opioid
use is becoming more prevalent due to environmental pressures such as COVID- 19.
Mental health of pregnant and postpartum women in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

AUTHOR(S)
Sarah E. D. Perzow; Ella-Marie P. Hennessey; M. Camille Hoffman (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Journal of affective disorders reports
The COVID-19 pandemic has been uniquely challenging for pregnant and postpartum women. Uncontrollable stress amplifies risk for maternal depression and anxiety, which are linked to adverse mother and child outcomes. This study examined change in internalizing symptoms from before to during the COVID-19 pandemic among pregnant and postpartum women longitudinally, and investigated moderation by loneliness and other contextual risk factors.
Association between the COVID-19 pandemic and the risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes: a cohort study

AUTHOR(S)
Min Du; Jie Yang; Na Han (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: BMJ Open

The secondary impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes remain unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the association between the COVID-19 pandemic and the risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes. This study conduced retrospective analyses on two cohorts comprising 7699 pregnant women in Beijing, China, and compared pregnancy outcomes between the pre-COVID-2019 cohort (women who delivered from 20 May 2019 to 30 November 2019) and the COVID-2019 cohort (women who delivered from 20 January 2020 to 31 July 2020). The secondary impacts of the COVID-2019 pandemic on pregnancy outcomes were assessed by using multivariate log-binomial regression models, and interrupted time-series (ITS) regression analysis was used to further control the effects of time-trends.

Cite this research | Vol.: 11 | Issue: 2 | No. of pages: 8 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: COVID-19, maternal and child health, pregnancy | Countries: China
Adherence to COVID‐19 preventive measures and associated factors among pregnant women in Ghana

AUTHOR(S)
Paschal Awingura Apanga; Maxwell Tii Kumbeni

Published: February 2021   Journal: Tropical Medicine & International Health
This article aimed to assess adherence to COVID‐19 preventive measures and its associated factors among pregnant women in Ghana. This was a cross‐sectional study conducted in the Nabdam district, Ghana. Data were collected from 527 pregnant women randomly selected from antenatal care clinics from 16 healthcare facilities. Descriptive statistics were used to assess the prevalence of adherence to COVID‐19 preventive measures. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the factors associated with COVID‐19 preventive measures, whilst adjusting for potential confounders.
Safety of tocilizumab in COVID‐19 pregnant women and their newborn: a retrospective study

AUTHOR(S)
Inés Jiménez‐Lozano; José Manuel Caro‐Teller; Nuria Fernández‐Hidalgo (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics
Tocilizumab is an IL‐6 receptor inhibitor agent which has been proposed as a candidate to stop the inflammatory phase of infection by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus‐2 (SARS‐CoV‐2). However, safety data of tocilizumab in pregnant women and their newborn are scarce. This study aimed to describe maternal and neonatal safety outcomes associated with tocilizumab treatment in pregnant women with severe COVID‐19.
Assessment of midwifery care providers intrapartum care competencies, in four sub-Saharan countries: a mixed-method study protocol

AUTHOR(S)
Ann‑Beth Moller; Joanne Welsh; Mechthild M. Gross (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Reproductive Health
This study aims to assess competencies (knowledge, skills and attitudes) of midwifery care providers as well as their experiences and perceptions of in-service training in the four study countries; Benin, Malawi, Tanzania and Uganda as part of the Action Leveraging Evidence to Reduce perinatal mortality and morbidity in sub-Saharan Africa project (ALERT). While today more women in low- and middle-income countries give birth in health care facilities, reductions in maternal and neonatal mortality have been less than expected. This paradox may be explained by the standard and quality of intrapartum care provision which depends on several factors such as health workforce capacity and the readiness of the health system as well as access to care.
Health anxiety and related factors among pregnant women during the COVID-19 pandemic: a cross-sectional study from Iran

AUTHOR(S)
Najmieh Saadati; Poorandokht Afshari; Hatam Boostani

Published: February 2021   Journal: BMC Psychiatry
The COVID-19 pandemic has affected many countries around the world and Iran was no exception. The aim of this study was to evaluate health anxiety of Iranian pregnant women during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Higher SARS-CoV-2 infection rate in pregnant patients

AUTHOR(S)
Erica M. Lokken; G. Gray Taylor; Emily M. Huebner (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: American journal of obstetrics and gynecology

During the early months of the coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, risks to pregnant women of a severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection were uncertain. Pregnant patients can serve as a model for the success of the clinical and public health response during public health emergencies as they are typically in frequent contact with the medical system. Population-based estimates of SARS-CoV-2 infections in pregnancy are unknown due to incomplete ascertainment of pregnancy status or inclusion of only single centers or hospitalized cases. Whether pregnant women were protected by the public health response or through their interactions with obstetrical providers in the early pandemic is poorly understood. This study aims to estimate the SARS-CoV-2 infection rate in pregnancy and examine disparities by race/ethnicity and English-language proficiency in Washington State.

A survey of postpartum depression and health care needs among Chinese postpartum women during the pandemic of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Ran An; Xiaoli Chen; Yuanyuan Wu (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Archives of Psychiatric Nursing

The COVID-19 pandemic seriously endangers the public's mental health, especially to pregnant and postpartum women. But little is known about postpartum depression and health care needs among Chinese postpartum women. This study aims to investigate the status and risk factors of postpartum depression and health care needs among Chinese postpartum women during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Mental health of pregnant and postpartum women in response to the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Sarah E. D. Perzow; Ella-Marie P. Hennessey; M. Camille Hoffman (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Journal of Affective Disorders Reportas
The COVID-19 pandemic has been uniquely challenging for pregnant and postpartum women. Uncontrollable stress amplifies risk for maternal depression and anxiety, which are linked to adverse mother and child outcomes. This study examined change in internalizing symptoms from before to during the COVID-19 pandemic among pregnant and postpartum women longitudinally, and investigated moderation by loneliness and other contextual risk factors.
Impact of SARS-CoV-2 infection on pregnancy outcomes: a population-based study

AUTHOR(S)
Francesca Crovetto; Fàtima Crispi; Elisa Llurba (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Clinical Infectious Diseases
This population-based study aims to describe the impact of SARS-CoV-2 infection on pregnancy outcomes. Prospective, population-based study including pregnant women consecutively attended at first/second trimester or at delivery at three hospitals in Barcelona, Spain. SARS-CoV-2 antibodies (IgG and IgM/IgA) were measured in all participants and nasopharyngeal RT-PCR was performed at delivery.
Pregnant women’s daily patterns of well-being before and during the COVID-19 pandemic in Finland: longitudinal monitoring through smartwatch technology

AUTHOR(S)
Hannakaisa Niela-Vile´n; Jennifer Auxier; Eeva Ekholm (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Plos One
Technology enables the continuous monitoring of personal health parameter data during pregnancy regardless of the disruption of normal daily life patterns. Our research group has established a project investigating the usefulness of an Internet of Things–based system and smartwatch technology for monitoring women during pregnancy to explore variations in stress, physical activity and sleep. The aim of this study was to examine daily patterns of well-being in pregnant women before and during the national stay-at-home restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic in Finland.
301 - 315 of 338

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.