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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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Impact of remote prenatal education on program participation and breastfeeding of women in rural and remote Indigenous communities

AUTHOR(S)
Amy Hui; Wanda Philips-Beck; Rhonda Campbell (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: EClinicalMedicine
First Nations (FN) women have a higher risk of diabetes than non-FN women in Canada. Prenatal education and breastfeeding may reduce the risk of diabetes in mothers and offspring. The rates of breastfeeding initiation and participation in the prenatal program are low in FN communities. A prenatal educational website, social media-assisted prenatal chat groups and community support teams were developed in three rural or remote FN communities in Manitoba. The rates of participation of pregnant women in prenatal programs and breastfeeding initiation were compared before and after the start of the remote prenatal education program within 2014-2017.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 35 | No. of pages: 9 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: breastfeeding, COVID-19 response, maternal and child health, prenatal care | Countries: Canada
The efficacy of reduced-visit prenatal care model during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic: a protocol for systematic review and meta-analysis

AUTHOR(S)
Xiaoli Wang; Ying Wang; Lin Liang

Published: April 2021   Journal: Medicine
While this reduced-visit prenatal care model during the COVID-19 pandemic is well-intentioned, there is still a lack of relevant evidence to prove its effectiveness. Therefore, in order to provide new evidence-based medical evidence for clinical treatment, this study undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the efficacy of reduced-visit prenatal care model during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 100 | No. of pages: 3 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: COVID-19, maternal and child health, pregnancy, pregnant women, prenatal care
The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on pregnancy planning behaviors

AUTHOR(S)
Angela C. Flynn; Kimberley Kavanagh; Andrea D. Smith (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Womens Health Reports
Our understanding of how the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has impacted decision-making for women planning to conceive is unclear. This paper aimed to investigate how the COVID-19 pandemic has influenced pregnancy planning behaviors. An online questionnaire of closed- and open-ended questions was utilized to capture pregnancy planning behaviors and reported behavioral changes during the COVID-19 pandemic in women planning pregnancy between January and July 2020. Closed-ended questions were analyzed quantitatively, and thematic framework analysis was utilized for open-ended responses.
Outcomes of newborns to mothers with COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
K. Ghema; M. Lehlimi; H. Toumi (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Infectious Diseases Now

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has spread rapidly across the world. Given the sharply increased infection rate, the number of pregnant women and children with COVID-19 is correspondingly on the rise. SARS-CoV-2 infection is transmitted through droplets; though hypothesized, other transmission routes have not been confirmed. As of now, it remains unclear whether and how SARS-CoV-2 can possibly be transmitted from the mother to the fetus. This study examines the medical records of 30 neonates born to women with COVID-19, the objective being to provide documented information on maternal-child transmission and infant outcomes.

Midwives’ experiences of providing maternity care during the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia

AUTHOR(S)
Zoe Bradfield; Yvonne Hauck; Caroline S. E. Homer (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Women and Birth
The COVID-19 pandemic has required rapid and radical changes to the way maternity care is provided in many nations across the world. Midwives provide care to childbearing women across the continuum and are key members of the maternity workforce in Australia. This paper aims to explore and describe midwives’ experiences of providing maternity care during the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia.
Exploring health-seeking behavior among adolescent mothers during the Ebola epidemic in Western rural district of Freetown, Sierra Leone

AUTHOR(S)
Hamida Massaquoi; Catherine Atuhaire; Gorgeous Sarah Chinkonono

Published: January 2021   Journal: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
From 2014 to 2016, the largest Ebola outbreak in history threatened Sierra Leone and its neighbouring countries, Guinea and Liberia. The Ebola outbreak impacted pregnant adolescent girl’s access to prenatal care during the pandemic. The aim of this study is to understand health-seeking behaviour among adolescent mothers who were pregnant during the Ebola epidemic in Waterloo, Sierra Leone
Mental health of pregnant women during the COVID-19 pandemic: a longitudinal study

AUTHOR(S)
Hernán López-Morales; Macarena Verónica Del Valle; Lorena Canet-Juric

Published: November 2020   Journal: Psychiatry Research
Several studies have reported the susceptibility of pregnant women to emotional instability and stress. Thus, pregnancy may be a risk factor that could deepen the already negative effects of the current COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, the aim of this study is to analyze longitudinally the psychopathological consequences of the pandemic in pregnant women, and to explore differences with non-pregnant women. The participants in this study were 102 pregnant women, and a control group of 102 non-pregnant women (most of them reported having university studies and little financial impact from the pandemic). 
Favorable outcomes among neonates not separated from their symptomatic SARS-CoV-2-infected mothers

AUTHOR(S)
Antoine Martenot; Imad Labbassi; Amélie Delfils-Stern (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Pediatric Research
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), resulting from infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), can affect pregnant women. Their newborns are at a higher risk of prematurity and early separation from their mothers, who may subsequently require intensive care for their own health. Although neonates born of mothers infected with SARS-CoV-2 during pregnancy are seemingly vulnerable to infection, studies have found that they were not at a high risk for severe infection and were very rarely affected by COVID-19. The presence of virus by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) has been reported in newborns before H 12 of life. In addition, antiviral immunoglobulin M has been detected in newborns at birth, suggesting that mother-to-infant viral transmission may occur. To date, however, only one case of vertical transmission has been clearly demonstrated. In several cases of early neonatal infection, postnatal contamination cannot be excluded. Moreover, only one case report found that the virus could pass from mother to infant through the mother’s breast milk.
Pregnancy and birth planning during COVID-19: the effects of tele-education offered to pregnant women on prenatal distress and pregnancy-related anxiety

AUTHOR(S)
Yeşim Aksoy Derya; Sümeyye Altiparmak; Emine Akça (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Midwifery
This study aims to examine pregnancy and birth planning during COVID-19 and the effects of a tele- education offered to pregnant women for this planning process on prenatal distress and pregnancy-related anxiety. The population of this quasi-experimental study was composed of pregnant women who applied for the antenatal education class of a public hospital in the east of Turkey during their past prenatal follow-ups and wrote their contact details in the registration book to participate in group trainings. The sample of the study consisted of a total of 96 pregnant women, including 48 in the experiment and 48 in the control groups, who were selected using power analysis and non-probability random sampling method.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 92 | No. of pages: 7 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: COVID-19 response, pregnancy, pregnant women, prenatal care, psychological distress | Countries: Turkey
Prospects for improving future mental health of children through prenatal maternal micronutrient supplementation in China

AUTHOR(S)
Ying Li; Robert Freedman

Published: June 2020   Journal: Pediatric Investigations
Prenatal micronutrients in pregnant women’s diets, including supplements, have an essential role in fetal brain development and may reduce the risk of mental disorders in offspring. Maternal dietary supplementation of nutrients is a benign and inexpensive intervention in pregnancy to prevent life‐long disability from mental illness.
The relationship between status at presentation and outcomes among pregnant women with COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Viktoriya London; Rodney McLaren; Fouad Atallah (et al.)

Published: May 2020   Journal: American Journal of Perinatology
This study was aimed to compare maternal and pregnancy outcomes of symptomatic and asymptomatic pregnant women with novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 991-994 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: maternal and child health, pregnant women, prenatal care
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.