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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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Future directions on BIPOC youth mental health: the importance of cultural rituals in the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
José M. Causadias; Lucía Alcalá; Kamryn S. Morris (et al.)

Published: June 2022   Journal: Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology
Culture plays an important role in the development of mental health, especially during childhood and adolescence. However, less is known about how participation in cultural rituals is related to the wellbeing of youth who are Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC), and part of the Global Majority. This is crucial amid the COVID-19 pandemic, a global event that has disproportionally affected BIPOC youth and disrupted participation in rituals. The goal of this paper is to promote advances in clinical child and adolescent psychology focused on rituals. It begins by defining culture and rituals and examining their role on development. It illustrates these issues with the Lunar New Year in China, Maya rituals in México, Ramadan in Turkey, and Black graduations and Latinx funerals in the United States. It discusses how the pandemic has affected participation in these rituals and their potential impact on BIPOC children and adolescents’ mental health.
Children and adolescents' ingroup biases and developmental differences in evaluations of peers Who misinform

AUTHOR(S)
Aqsa Farooq; Eirini Ketzitzidou Argyri; Anna Adlam (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Frontiers in Psychology
Previous developmental research shows that young children display a preference for ingroup members when it comes to who they accept information from – even when that information is false. However, it is not clear how this ingroup bias develops into adolescence, and how it affects responses about peers who misinform in intergroup contexts, which is important to explore with growing numbers of young people on online platforms. Given that the developmental span from childhood to adolescence is when social groups and group norms are particularly important, the present study took a Social Reasoning Developmental Approach. This study explored whether children and adolescents respond differently to a misinformer spreading false claims about a peer breaking COVID-19 rules, depending on (a) the group membership of the misinformer and their target and (b) whether the ingroup had a “critical” norm that values questioning information before believing it.
Prosocial development in adolescence

AUTHOR(S)
Eveline A. Crone; Michelle Achterberg

Published: October 2021   Journal: Current Opinion in Psychology
This review describes the development of prosocial behavior in adolescence as a critical inflection period for social adjustment. Experimental research using prosocial giving tasks demonstrates that adolescents differentiate more between recipients and contexts, suggesting increasing ingroup-outgroup differentiation during adolescence. It also demonstrates that social brain development during adolescence is partly driven by environmental influences, further underlining adolescence as a critical period for social development. The COVID-19 pandemic has had and will have long-term effects on the current generation of adolescents, for which we describe both the risks, resilience factors, and opportunities for engaging in prosocial acts of kindness.
A network analysis of adolescent mental well-being during the coronavirus pandemic:evidence for cross-cultural differences in central features

AUTHOR(S)
Meenakshi Shukla; Alison F. W. Wu; Iris Lavi (et al.)

Published: October 2021   Journal: Personality and Individual Differences
The COVID-19 pandemic continues to pose unprecedented threat globally. Adolescents and youth may be especially susceptible to the long-term impact of these stressors, thus intervening early is an important priority. However, it is also crucial to understand how young people maintain psychological well-being in the face of adversity, particularly given that many nations are experiencing further waves of the pandemic. The understanding of such resilient outcomes could inform the development of programs to encourage positive mental health. This study explored adolescents' resilience to the COVID-19 pandemic stress by examining core aspects of well-being across countries using network analysis. Using the short Warwick–Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale, cross-sectional data was collected online from adolescents from India (N = 310; Males = 159, Females = 151, aged 12–18), Israel (N = 306; Males = 154, Females = 152, aged 12–18) and the United Kingdom (UK; N = 1666; Males = 598, Females = 1068, aged 12–25). Two highly similar network clusters were identified for UK and Israel, with three clusters emerging for India. UK and Israeli networks centred on “dealing with problems well” while Indian centred on “feeling useful”. As central items highlight aspects of well-being that influence or are influenced by other aspects, these findings may inform interventions to safeguard adolescent mental health during future phases of the pandemic.
Social learning from media: the need for a culturally diachronic developmental psychology

AUTHOR(S)
Mark Nielsen; Frankie T. K. Fong; Andrew Whiten

Published: July 2021   Journal: Advances in Child Development and Behavior

Since the proliferation of television sets into households began over half a century ago there has been widespread interest in the impact that viewing has on young children's development. Such interest has grown with the increasing availability of smart phones and tablets. This review examines the literature documenting human social learning and how this learning is impacted when the instructing agent appears on a screen instead of face-to-face. It then explores the shifting nature of screen-based media, with a focus on the increasingly socio-normative manner information is portrayed. It discusses how the changing nature of screen technology might be altering how children interpret what they see, and raise the possibility that this may render prevailing evidence as historical documentation, rather than setting out established developmental milestones that transcend the period in which they were documented.

Philosophy for children and mindfulness during COVID-19: results from a randomized cluster trial and impact on mental health in elementary school students

AUTHOR(S)
Catherine Malboeuf-Hurtubise; Terra Léger-Goodes; Geneviève A. Mageau (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry

Preliminary evidence suggests that the COVID-19 pandemic has had a negative impact on children's mental health. Given these problems can have significant impacts throughout the lifespan, preventing the negative repercussions of COVID-19 on children's mental health is essential. Philosophy for children (P4C) and mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) show promise in this regard. The goal of the present study was to compare the impact of online MBI and P4C interventions on mental health, within the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.

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