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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1 - 15 of 87
Stress, resilience, and well-being in Italian children and their parents during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Maria Cusinato; Sara Iannattone; Andrea Spoto (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak has forced parents and children to adopt significant changes in their daily routine, which has been a big challenge for families, with important implications for family stress. This study aims to analyze the potential risk and protective factors for parents’ and children’s well-being during a potentially traumatic event such as the COVID-19 quarantine. Specifically, it investigates parents’ and children’s well-being, parental stress, and children’s resilience. The study involved 463 Italian parents of children aged 5–17.
Parental psychological distress associated with COVID-19 outbreak: a large-scale multicenter survey from Turkey

AUTHOR(S)
Alperen Bıkmazer; Muhammed Tayyib Kadak; Vahdet Görmez (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: International Journal of Social Psychiatry
Pandemics can cause substantial psychological distress; however, we do not know the impact of the COVID-19 related lockdown and mental health burden on the parents of school age children. This study aims to comparatively examine the COVID-19 related stress and psychological burden of the parents with different occupational, locational, and mental health status related backgrounds.
Intersecting vulnerabilities: the impacts of COVID-19 on the psycho-emotional lives of young people in low- and middle-income countries

AUTHOR(S)
Prerna Banati; Nicola Jones; Sally Youssef

Published: November 2020   Journal: The European Journal of Development Research
Across diverse contexts, emerging evidence suggests that the COVID-19 pandemic is increasing levels of anxiety and stress. In calling for greater attention to people’s psychosocial and emotional well-being, global actors have paid insufcient attention to the realities of the pandemic in low- and middle-income countries, where millions of people are already exposed to intersecting vulnerabilities. Chronic poverty, protracted violence, confict and displacement, coupled with weak health, education and protection systems, provide the backdrop of many adolescents’ lives. Drawing on qualitative in-country telephone interviews with over 500 adolescents in Ethiopia, Côte d’Ivoire and Lebanon, this article unpacks the age and gendered dimensions of COVID-19 and its response.
Working with communities to mitigate the collateral impact of COVID-19 on children and young people

AUTHOR(S)
Charles Coughlan; Arpana Soni; Hanan Ghouneim

Published: November 2020   Journal: BMJ Paediatrics Open
The complex consequences of the pandemic cannot be addressed sustainably without community engagement, which takes on renewed importance in our era of ‘fake news’ and scepticism towards authority figures. This case study suggests that citizens value direct involvement in codesigning policy resources as it provides them with a sense of control during a crisis. Young people can participate directly in research as peer researchers, giving them new skills and simultaneously enhancing access to seldom-heard groups. This citizen-led approach to health and care in confirm the value of participatory research and community engagement in driving sustainable, patient-centred change.
Adolescents' perceived socio-emotional impact of COVID-19 and implications for mental health: results from a U.S.-based mixed-methods study

AUTHOR(S)
Adam A. Rogers; Thao Ha; Sydney Ockey

Published: November 2020   Journal: Journal of Adolescent Health
COVID-19 has disrupted many aspects of adolescents' lives, yet little data are available that document their subjective experiences of the pandemic. In a mixed-methods study of U.S. adolescents, this study examines (1) adolescents' perceptions of how their social and emotional lives had changed during COVID-19; and (2) associations between these perceived changes and indices of their mental health, above and beyond their prepandemic mental health status.
COVID-19 pandemic impact on children and adolescents' mental health: biological, environmental, and social factors
Published: November 2020
Since the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) was announced, we had an unprecedented change in the way we organize ourselves socially and in our daily routine. Children and adolescents were also greatly impacted by the abrupt withdrawal from school, social life and outdoor activities. Some of them also experienced domestic violence growing. The stress they are subjected to directly impacts their mental health on account of increased anxiety, changes in their diets and in school dynamics, fear or even failing to scale the problem. The aim of this study is to bring up a discussion under different aspects and to alert public health and government agents about the need for surveillance and care of these individuals. Hopefully, the damage to their mental health as a result of the side effect of this pandemic can be mitigated by adequate and timely intervention.
Testing the effects of COVID-19 confinement in Spanish children: the role of parents’ distress, emotional problems and specific parenting

AUTHOR(S)
Estrella Romero; Laura López-Romero; Beatriz Domínguez-Álvarez (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.
The present study aimed to examine the effects of the Spanish confinement derived from the COVID-19 crisis on children and their families, accounting for child’s age. A range of child negative (e.g., conduct problems) and positive outcomes (e.g., routine maintenance) were examined, along with a set of parent-related variables, including resilience, perceived distress, emotional problems, parenting distress and specific parenting practices (e.g., structured or avoidant parenting), which were modeled through path analysis to better understand child adjustment.
Risk and protective factors for prospective changes in adolescent mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Natasha R. Magson; Justin Y. A. Freeman; Ronald M. Rapee (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Youth and Adolescence
The restrictions put in place to contain the COVID-19 virus have led to widespread social isolation, impacting mental health worldwide. These restrictions may be particularly difficult for adolescents, who rely heavily on their peer connections for emotional support. However, there has been no longitudinal research examining the psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic among adolescents. This study addresses this gap by investigating the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on adolescents mental health, and moderators of change, as well as assessing the factors perceived as causing the most distress.
Pregnancy and birth planning during COVID-19: the effects of tele-education offered to pregnant women on prenatal distress and pregnancy-related anxiety

AUTHOR(S)
Yeşim Aksoy Derya; Sümeyye Altiparmak; Emine Akça (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Midwifery
This study aims to examine pregnancy and birth planning during COVID-19 and the effects of a tele- education offered to pregnant women for this planning process on prenatal distress and pregnancy-related anxiety. The population of this quasi-experimental study was composed of pregnant women who applied for the antenatal education class of a public hospital in the east of Turkey during their past prenatal follow-ups and wrote their contact details in the registration book to participate in group trainings. The sample of the study consisted of a total of 96 pregnant women, including 48 in the experiment and 48 in the control groups, who were selected using power analysis and non-probability random sampling method.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 92 | No. of pages: 7 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: pregnancy, pregnant women, prenatal care, psychological distress, COVID-19 response | Countries: Turkey
A survey of parents of children attending the online classes during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Sandeep Grover; Sandeep Kumar Goyal; Aseem Mehra (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: The Indian Journal of Pediatrics

This cross-sectional survey, conducted in India, aims to assess the impact of online classes on the children and parents/guardians. It was conducted during the period of 21st June 2020 to 17th July 2020 among the guardians of children attending the online classes,

Child welfare workers and peritraumatic distress: the impact of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
J. Jay Miller; Chunling Niu; Shannon Moody

Published: October 2020   Journal: Children and Youth Services Review
Whilst there is broad consensus that COVID-19 has had a pernicious impact on child welfare services, in general, and child welfare workers, specifically, this notion has not been thoroughly examined in the literature. This exploratory study examined COVID-19 related peritraumatic distress among child welfare workers (N = 1996) in one southeastern state in the United States (U.S.). Findings suggest that the study sample was experiencing distress levels above normal ranges; 46.4% of participants were experiencing mild or severe distress. Sexual orientation, self-reported physical and mental health, relationship status, supervision status, and financial stability impacted distress levels experienced by child welfare workers. Overall, data suggest that COVID-19 is impacting child welfare workers and there is a need to conceptualize, implement, and evaluate initiatives aimed at assuaging distress among child welfare workers.
The prevalence of behavioral problems among school-aged children in home quarantine during the COVID-19 pandemic in China

AUTHOR(S)
Qi Liu; Xinyan Xie; Qi Xue (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Affective Disorders

To prevent spreading of the COVID-19 infection, many countries have implemented a nationwide school closure. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of behavioral problems in school-aged children during home confinement.  An internet-based survey involving 1264 children (grades 2-6) and their parents from two primary schools between February 25 and March 8, 2020 was conducted in Hubei province, China. Behavioral problems were evaluated using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ).

Impacts of the COVID‐19 pandemic on youth mental health among youth with physical health challenges

AUTHOR(S)
Lisa D. Hawke; Suneeta Monga; Daphne Korczak (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Early Intervention in Psychiatry
This paper aims to examine mental health in conjunction with physical health during the COVID‐19 pandemic among youth with physical health conditions compared to those without. A cross‐sectional survey of 622 youth aged 14 to 28 was conducted. Analyses were conducted to understand the changes in mental and physical health among youth in four groups: (a) participants with a friend or family member diagnosed with COVID‐19, (b) participants with symptoms associated with COVID‐19, (c) participants with atopic conditions (asthma and allergies), and (d) participants with other preexisting physical health conditions.
Life conditions during COVID-19 lockdown and mental health in Spanish adolescents

AUTHOR(S)
Lourdes Ezpeleta; José Blas Navarro; Núria De la Osa (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Spanish children were locked down for 72 days due to COVID-19, causing severe disruption to their normal life. The threat posed by COVID-19 continues and clinicians, administrators, and families need to know the life conditions associated with more psychological problems to modify them and minimize their effect on mental health. The goal was to study the life conditions of adolescents during lockdown and their association with psychological problems. A total of 226 parents of 117 girls and 109 boys (mean age: 13.9; Standard deviation: 0.28) from the community that were participants in a longitudinal study answered an online questionnaire about life conditions during lockdown and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Stepwise regression analyses controlling by previous reports of SDQ were performed.
Helping siblings of children with behavioral health disorders weather the COVID‐19 storm

AUTHOR(S)
Wendy Plante

Published: October 2020   Journal: The Brown University Child and Adolescent Behavior Letter
As schools and outpatient clinics shut their doors in the spring of 2020 in response to the COVID‐19 pandemic, children with developmental disabilities were being taught at home, with their parents helping to facilitate their education and many of their special services, sometimes with professionals on the other end of a screen and sometimes not. While it is too soon to know from empirical research how these circumstances have affected typically developing, healthy siblings, we can use the existing research on sibling needs to help parents, schools, medical and behavioral providers, and community supports to predict impact on siblings and put supports into place.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.