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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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226 - 240 of 336
A survey of parents of children attending the online classes during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Sandeep Grover; Sandeep Kumar Goyal; Aseem Mehra (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: The Indian Journal of Pediatrics

This cross-sectional survey, conducted in India, aims to assess the impact of online classes on the children and parents/guardians. It was conducted during the period of 21st June 2020 to 17th July 2020 among the guardians of children attending the online classes,

Child welfare workers and peritraumatic distress: the impact of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
J. Jay Miller; Chunling Niu; Shannon Moody

Published: October 2020   Journal: Children and Youth Services Review
Whilst there is broad consensus that COVID-19 has had a pernicious impact on child welfare services, in general, and child welfare workers, specifically, this notion has not been thoroughly examined in the literature. This exploratory study examined COVID-19 related peritraumatic distress among child welfare workers (N = 1996) in one southeastern state in the United States (U.S.). Findings suggest that the study sample was experiencing distress levels above normal ranges; 46.4% of participants were experiencing mild or severe distress. Sexual orientation, self-reported physical and mental health, relationship status, supervision status, and financial stability impacted distress levels experienced by child welfare workers. Overall, data suggest that COVID-19 is impacting child welfare workers and there is a need to conceptualize, implement, and evaluate initiatives aimed at assuaging distress among child welfare workers.
The prevalence of behavioral problems among school-aged children in home quarantine during the COVID-19 pandemic in China

AUTHOR(S)
Qi Liu; Xinyan Xie; Qi Xue (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Affective Disorders

To prevent spreading of the COVID-19 infection, many countries have implemented a nationwide school closure. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of behavioral problems in school-aged children during home confinement.  An internet-based survey involving 1264 children (grades 2-6) and their parents from two primary schools between February 25 and March 8, 2020 was conducted in Hubei province, China. Behavioral problems were evaluated using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ).

Impacts of the COVID‐19 pandemic on youth mental health among youth with physical health challenges

AUTHOR(S)
Lisa D. Hawke; Suneeta Monga; Daphne Korczak (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Early Intervention in Psychiatry
This paper aims to examine mental health in conjunction with physical health during the COVID‐19 pandemic among youth with physical health conditions compared to those without. A cross‐sectional survey of 622 youth aged 14 to 28 was conducted. Analyses were conducted to understand the changes in mental and physical health among youth in four groups: (a) participants with a friend or family member diagnosed with COVID‐19, (b) participants with symptoms associated with COVID‐19, (c) participants with atopic conditions (asthma and allergies), and (d) participants with other preexisting physical health conditions.
Life conditions during COVID-19 lockdown and mental health in Spanish adolescents

AUTHOR(S)
Lourdes Ezpeleta; José Blas Navarro; Núria De la Osa (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Spanish children were locked down for 72 days due to COVID-19, causing severe disruption to their normal life. The threat posed by COVID-19 continues and clinicians, administrators, and families need to know the life conditions associated with more psychological problems to modify them and minimize their effect on mental health. The goal was to study the life conditions of adolescents during lockdown and their association with psychological problems. A total of 226 parents of 117 girls and 109 boys (mean age: 13.9; Standard deviation: 0.28) from the community that were participants in a longitudinal study answered an online questionnaire about life conditions during lockdown and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Stepwise regression analyses controlling by previous reports of SDQ were performed.
Helping siblings of children with behavioral health disorders weather the COVID‐19 storm

AUTHOR(S)
Wendy Plante

Published: October 2020   Journal: The Brown University Child and Adolescent Behavior Letter
As schools and outpatient clinics shut their doors in the spring of 2020 in response to the COVID‐19 pandemic, children with developmental disabilities were being taught at home, with their parents helping to facilitate their education and many of their special services, sometimes with professionals on the other end of a screen and sometimes not. While it is too soon to know from empirical research how these circumstances have affected typically developing, healthy siblings, we can use the existing research on sibling needs to help parents, schools, medical and behavioral providers, and community supports to predict impact on siblings and put supports into place.
Maternal perceptions of sleep problems among children and mothers during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) pandemic in Israel

AUTHOR(S)
Ghadir Zreik; Kfir Asraf; Iris Haimov (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Sleep Research
Despite the marked impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) pandemic on the life of families and its possible negative implications for sleep, little is known about how sleep among parents and children has been impacted by this current crisis. The present study addresses, for the first time, possible consequences of the COVID‐19 crisis and home confinement on maternal anxiety, maternal insomnia, and maternal reports of sleep problems among children aged 6–72 months in Israel.

The potential impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on child growth and development: a systematic review

AUTHOR(S)
Liubiana Arantes de Araújo; Cássio Frederico Veloso; Matheus de Campos Souza (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Jornal de Pediatria
This systematic review examines the impact of social restriction on mental and developmental health in parents and children/adolescents. Findings indicate that the tools used to mitigate the threat of a pandemic such as COVID-19 may very well threaten child growth and development. These tools — such as social restrictions, shutdowns, and school closures — contribute to stress in parents and children and can become risk factors that threaten child growth and development. Adverse childhood experiences increase the risk of developmental delays and health problems in adulthood, such as cognitive impairment, substance abuse, depression, and non-communicable diseases.
Information about the impact of epidemics on parents and children is relevant to policy makers to aid them in developing strategies to help families cope with epidemic/pandemic-driven adversity and ensure their children’s healthy development.
Impact of COVID-19 outbreak on mental health and perceived strain among caregivers tending children with special needs

AUTHOR(S)
Sapna Dhiman; Pradeep Kumar Sahu; William R. Reed (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Research in Developmental Disabilities

While COVID-19 outbreak has had adverse psychological effects in children with special needs, the mental state and burden on their caregivers during this pandemic has yet to be reported. The COVID-19 outbreak has had a significant impact on caregiver strain compared to perceived strain before the pandemic. Prevalence of depressive symptoms is high among caregivers of children with special needs. Negative perception of homecare therapy is associated with higher perceived strain and poor mental health. Not using tele-rehabilitation and perception of it being a poor medium for rehabilitation pose greater mental health risks.

When adolescents are in school during COVID-19: coordination between school-based health centers and education is key

AUTHOR(S)
Sara Anderson; Simon Haeder; Kelli Caseman (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Adolescent Health
Schools and School-based Health Centers (SBHC) play complementary roles in adolescent’s lives. The intersection between health care, notably SBHCs, and education has never seemed as pronounced as during the COVID-19 pandemic. Amidst the rapidly changing landscapes for both education and healthcare lie ample opportunities for better alignment of strategies to ensure that, once children return to the classroom (whether in person or virtual), all have access to a comprehensive, culturally appropriate, affordable healthcare delivery systems. This study provides recommendations related to SBHCs that could benefit adolescent health during the return to school. 
Mental health and its correlates among children and adolescents during COVID-19 school closure: the importance of parent-child discussion

AUTHOR(S)
Suqin Tang; Mi Xiang; Teris Cheung (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Affective Disorders
 School closures due to the COVID-19 outbreak have affected 87% of the world’s students physically, socially, and psychologically, yet rigorous investigation into their mental health during this period is still lacking. This is a  cross-sectional  online  survey  of  4,342  primary  and  secondary  school  students  from Shanghai,  China ,  conducted  during  March  13–23,  2020. Besides  demographic  information, psychological distress (including depression, anxiety, and stress), life satisfaction, perceived impact of home quarantine, and parent-child discussions on COVID-19 were assessed.
Implications of COVID19-induced nation-wide lockdown on children's behavior in Punjab, India

AUTHOR(S)
Bhupinder Kaur Sama; Palakpreet Kaur; Parteek Singh Thind (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Child: care, health and development
Lockdown is one of the prevalent tools that are used to control the spread of COVID-19 virus in India. Under the circumstances created during lockdown period, children are deprived from the social interaction and companionship; because of which, they are susceptible to psychiatric disorders. Therefore, in this questionnaire-based study, efforts were to understand the impacts of lockdown on the mental status of the children of India and their specific causes.
Parenting activities and the transition to home-based education during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Shawna J. Lee; Kaitlin P. Ward; Olivia D. Chang (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Children and Youth Services Review
This study reports on parent-child dynamics following COVID-19 related school closures, based on cross-sectional analyses of a survey that utilized a convenience sampling approach. Data were collected approximately five weeks after the World Health Organization declared that the Coronavirus was a pandemic. Participants (N = 405) were adults recruited throughout the U.S. This study examines data from parents (69% mothers and 31% fathers) with at least one child 0-12 years of age.
COVID-19 in children and young people

AUTHOR(S)
Matthew D. Snape; Russell M. Viner

Published: October 2020   Journal: Science
Children have a low risk of COVID-19 and are disproportionately harmed by precautions. Maintaining young people’s education and wellbeing must remain an important priority for society in the COVID-19 era.
Early childhood educators’ workplace well-being: it’s everyone’s right!
Published: October 2020   Journal: Australasian Journal of Early Childhood
Extant literature on early childhood educator workplace well-being focuses on the disease model of well-being, with studies mainly addressing stress and burnout. There is a paucity of research conceptualising healthy workplace well-being for educators and an absence of theorising to frame, understand and enhance early childhood educator workplace well-being. This paper reports on Phase 2 of an exploratory sequential mixed methods study, which aimed to explore the individual, relational, and contextual factors influencing healthy workplace well-being. Using Phase 1 interview findings (Author, blind for review), a survey was developed to investigate predictors on workplace well-being in early childhood services in Australia.
226 - 240 of 336

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.