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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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31 - 45 of 189
Positive and negative experiences of living in COVID-19 pandemic: analysis of Italian adolescents’ narratives

AUTHOR(S)
Chiara Fioretti; Benedetta Emanuela Palladino; Annalaura Nocentini (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Frontiers in Psychology

Despite a growing interest in the field, scarce narrative studies have delved into adolescents’ psychological experiences related to global emergencies caused by infective diseases. The present study aims to investigate adolescents’ narratives on positive and negative experiences related to COVID-19. Italian adolescents, 2,758 (females = 74.8%, mean age = 16.64, SD = 1.43), completed two narrative tasks on their most negative and positive experiences during the COVID-19 emergency. Data were analyzed by modeling an analysis of emergent themes.

Mental health of urban mothers (MUM) study: a multicentre randomised controlled trial, study protocol

AUTHOR(S)
Simone Eliane Schwank; Ho-Fung Chung; Mandy Hsu (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: BMJ Open

Mental health disorders are common during pregnancy and the postnatal period and can have serious adverse effects on women and their children. The consequences for global mental health due to COVID-19 are likely to be significant and may have a long-term impact on the global burden of disease. Besides physical vulnerability, pregnant women are at increased risk of mental health problems such as anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder due to the consequences of social distancing. It can result in altered healthcare routines, less support from the family and friends, and in some cases, partners not being allowed to be present during prenatal visits, labour and delivery. Higher than expected, rates of perinatal anxiety and depression have been already reported during the pandemic. Pregnant women may also feel insecure and worried about the effects of COVID-19 on their unborn child if they get infected during pregnancy. Today, young urban women are used to using internet services frequently and efficiently. Therefore, providing mental health support to pregnant women via internet may be effective in ameliorating their anxiety/depression, reducing the risk of serious mental health disorders, and lead to improved maternal and perinatal outcomes. This paper aims to explore the effectiveness of a web-based psychosocial peer-to-peer support intervention in reducing the risk and severity of perinatal mental health disorders and preventing adverse pregnancy outcomes among pregnant women living in metropolitan urban settings.

E-mentoring program organized by the Turkish association for child and adolescent psychiatry during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Eyüp Sabri Ercan; Ali Evren Tufan; Özlem Meryem Kütük (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
The Turkish Association for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (CAP) was established in 1991 and number of CAPs in Turkey has increased more than twice with the assistance of policy makers . The rapid increase in number of members necessitated standardization of training, education, and mentoring. Within the past 5 years, the association, with the efforts of its president Prof. Dr. Eyüp Sabri Ercan, formed a research academy to allow interaction between mentors and mentees and to commemorate one of its deceased senior members, Prof. Dr. Selahattin Senol. This academy focused on research methodology and statistics, however, and the global pandemic prevented its sixth meeting. With the disruption of academic meetings brought on by the Covid19 pandemic, the importance of electronic meetings has increased and the association planned an alternative mentoring program addressing both clinical and research issues. For the past 10 years, there have been significant advances in electronic learning, moderating, and mentoring. The Covid19 pandemic has further increased the use of electronic/online educational systems all over the world.
COVID‐19 and children: the mental & physical reverberations of the pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Saad Arslan Iqbal; Namra Tayyab

Published: November 2020   Journal: Child: Care, Health and Development
By now, a majority of the countries around the globe whether big or small and developed or developing have all been engulfed in a ‘global pandemic’ infamously known as the COVID‐19. To curtail the rapidly increasing transmission of the disease, the international community resorted to partial or nationwide lockdowns and isolation policies prompting closures of schools and other educational institutes. According to the UNICEF and United Nations, around 188 nations imposed country‐wide school closures affecting more than 1.6 billion children and youth. Consequently, the physical distancing measures and school closures have had many implications on the mental and physical health and well-being of the children and their families.
The impact of the COVID‐19 pandemic on the mental health and well‐being of children and young people

AUTHOR(S)
Helen Cowie; Carrie‐Anne Myers

Published: November 2020   Journal: Children & Society
The COVID‐19 pandemic has had an enormous impact across the world. This discussion paper examines the effect that lockdown has had on the mental health and well‐being of children and young people. It is written from a UK perspective in the light of the international evidence. Many of the discussion points raised resonate globally. The article discusses how these issues can be dealt with and sets out potential solutions as the world emerges from this global crisis.
Adolescent mental health, COVID-19, and the value of school-community partnerships

AUTHOR(S)
Marci F. Hertz; Lisa Cohen Barrios

Published: November 2020
Newly released 2019 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System data and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC)’2019 Youth Risk Behavior Survey Data Summary and Trends Report show that US adolescents continue to suffer from poor mental health and suicidality at alarming rates. These data alone would be cause for concern, but the COVID-19 pandemic has the potential to further erode adolescent mental health, particularly for those whose mental health was poor prior to the pandemic. Given the status of adolescent mental health prior to COVID-19 and the impact of COVID-19, health professionals and schools must partner together now to mitigate potentially deleterious health, mental health and education impacts for children and adolescents.
Characteristics and considerations in the medical treatment of COVID‐19 in children

AUTHOR(S)
Kazunori Imai; Asako Matsushima; Shinji Saitoh

Published: November 2020   Journal: Acute Medicine & Surgery
It is rare for children to be in serious condition or die from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) caused by the 2019 novel coronavirus (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 [SARS‐CoV‐2]) except for those with underlying diseases such as chronic lung disease (including asthma), cardiovascular disease, and immunosuppressive disease. Recently, patients with hyperinflammatory shock have been identified among children who are confirmed to have or are suspected of having SARS‐CoV‐2 infection. The presenting signs and symptoms are characterized by prolonged fever, abdominal pain, and cardiac involvement without any signs of pneumonia on chest computed tomography. However, it is uncertain at this time whether SARS‐CoV‐2 infection affects this syndrome. 
Knowledge, attitudes, and practices towards COVID-19 among primary school students in Hubei Province, China

AUTHOR(S)
Qi Xue; Xinyan Xie; Qi Liu (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Children and youth services review
This study was aimed to investigate the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) towards coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) among school-aged children in the Hubei province when children were being confined to their homes. The questionnaire included questions of KAP about COVID-19, depressive and anxiety symptoms scales. Multivariable generalized linear regressions models were applied to estimate the unstandardized regression coefficients (β) of KAP.
Increased psychological distress during COVID-19 and quarantine in Ireland: a national survey

AUTHOR(S)
Tom Burke; Anna Berry; Laura K. Taylor

Published: November 2020   Journal: Journal of Clinical Medicine
The emergence of the coronavirus pneumonia (COVID-19) resulted in a global pandemic. The psychological impact of an epidemic is multifaceted and acute, with long-term consequences. Methods: A cross-sectional online survey-based design was employed, assessing the psychological impact of COVID-19 on members of the Irish public during the quarantine period of COVID-19 in Ireland. Participants were invited to complete the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21) retrospectively (prior to quarantine) and during the quarantine period, as well as measures of illness perceptions, well-being, and a bespoke measure (the Effects of COVID Questionnaire, ECQ), which assessed perceptions of COVID-related stresses associated with personal concerns, caring for children, caring for aging parents, as well as gratitude.
COVID-19 pandemic: increased risk for psychopathology in children and adolescents?

AUTHOR(S)
Esther Via; Xavier Estrada-Prat; Jordina Tor (et al.)

Published: November 2020
Abstract COVID-19 pandemic is prompting multiple stressors-including control strategies such as lockdown- which may impact child and adolescent mental health. 1,529 caregivers answered an online questionnaire about emotional and behavioral symptoms of youths (4-18 years old) using the Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC).
Immediate psychological effects of the COVID-19 quarantine in youth from Italy and Spain

AUTHOR(S)
Mireia Orgilés; Alexandra Morales; Elisa Delvecchio (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Frontiers in Psychology
The COVID-19 quarantine has affected more than 860 million children and adolescents worldwide, but to date, no study has been developed within Western countries to examine the psychological impact on their lives. The present study aims to examine for the first time the emotional impact of the quarantine on children and adolescents from Italy and Spain, two of the countries most affected by COVID-19.
COVID-19 and youth substance use

AUTHOR(S)
Chuck Ingoglia

Published: November 2020   Journal: The Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research
An “epidemic hidden in a pandemic”. That is what Andrea Raby, D.O. of Bayless Integrated Healthcare, calls the threat to our youth who are now at increased risk of substance use disorder and overdose in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Anxiety, depression and PTSD among children and their parent during 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in China

AUTHOR(S)
Jinming Yue; Xueyan Zang; Yunying Le (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Current Psychology
Home quarantine may lead to families developing a variety of psychological distress. The purpose of this study was to examine the psychological status of children and their parent during 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in China. Data were collected from children (n = 1360) and their parent (n = 1360) in China using online survey during February 2020. Demographic information, media exposure, and psychological status including anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms were assessed using self-report measures.
Vulnerability and resilience in children during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Winnie W. Y. Tso; Rosa S. Wong; Keith T. S. Tung (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is having a profound impact on the health and development of children worldwide. There is limited evidence on the impact of COVID-19 and its related school closures and disease-containment measures on the psychosocial wellbeing of children; little research has been done on the characteristics of vulnerable groups and factors that promote resilience. This research conducted a large-scale cross-sectional population study of Hong Kong families with children aged 2–12 years.
COVID-19 quarantine-related mental health symptoms and their correlates among mothers: a cross sectional study

AUTHOR(S)
Somaya H. Malkawi; Khader Almhdawi; Alaa F. Jaber (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Maternal and Child Health Journal
One of the strictest quarantines worldwide to limit the spread of coronavirus was enforced in Jordan during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study investigated reported mental health and changes in lifestyle practices among Jordanian mothers during COVID-19 quarantine. The specifc objectives included studying the level of depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms and their potential statistical associations with demographic and lifestyle variables. Furthermore, the study aimed to investigate differences in mental health between different demographic and socio-economic groups and to examine the major lifestyle changes that occurred on mothers during the quarantine.
31 - 45 of 189

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.