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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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31 - 45 of 53
The social determinants of health as predictors of adherence to public health preventive measures among parents and young children during the COVID-19 pandemic: a longitudinal cohort study

AUTHOR(S)
Yulika Yoshida-Montezuma; Charles D. G. Keown-Stoneman; Susitha Wanigaratne (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: Canadian journal of public health

To investigate whether social determinants of health (SDOH) are predictive of adherence to public health preventive measures and to describe changes in adherence over time among parents and children. A longitudinal study was conducted in children aged 0–10 years and their parents through the TARGet Kids! COVID-19 Study in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada (April–July 2020). This study included 335 parents (2108 observations) and 416 children (2632 observations).

Pediatricians’ COVID-19 experiences and views on the willingness to receive COVID-19 vaccines: a cross-sectional survey in Turkey

AUTHOR(S)
Erdem Gönüllü; Ahmet Soysal; Serkan Atıcı (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics
Developing an effective and safe vaccine against Covid-19 will facilitate return to normal. Due to hesitation toward the vaccine, it is crucial to explore the acceptability of the COVID-19 vaccine to the public and healthcare workers. In this cross-sectional survey, we invited 2251 pediatricians and 506 (22%) of them responded survey and 424 (84%) gave either nasopharyngeal swap or antibody assay for COVID-19 and 71 (14%) of them got diagnosis of COVID-19. If the effective and safe COVID-19 vaccine was launched on market, 420 (83%) of pediatrician accepted to get vaccine shot, 422 (83%) of them recommended vaccination to their family members, 380 (75%) of them accepted to vaccine their children and 445 (85%) of them offered vaccination to their pediatric patients.
Covid-19 in New Zealand and the Pacific: implications for children and families

AUTHOR(S)
Claire Freeman; Christina Ergler; Robin Kearns (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Children's Geographies
The experience of Covid-19 in Aotearoa New Zealand in 2020 has been strongly shaped by a narrative emanating from a robust partnership between politicians and public health experts. This narrative treads a careful line between hard and soft responses. To elaborate, enacting policy such as closing borders and requiring ‘lockdown’ was swift and firm but was accompanied by an attempt to develop a disposition of care and empathy towards the public. While there has been hardship for some families, the soft messaging has, we argue, led to aspects of the response that have been decidedly child-friendly. At the regional scale, border closures have impacted heavily on Pacific Island families, separating families as parents have been unable to return to their home islands and through the loss of economic opportunities associated with seasonal work and in local - often tourism dominated economies. In a COVID-era the future looks uncertain for children both within New Zealand and in the wider Pacific realm.
The effect of COVID-19 on maternal newborn and child health (MNCH) services in Bangladesh, Nigeria and South Africa: call for a contextualised pandemic response in LMICs

AUTHOR(S)
Tanvir Ahmed; Ahmed Ehsanur Rahman; Taiwo Gboluwaga Amole (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: International Journal for Equity in Health
Global response to COVID-19 pandemic has inadvertently undermined the achievement of existing public health priorities and largely overlooked local context. Recent evidence suggests that this will cause additional maternal and childhood mortality and morbidity especially in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). This paper has explored the contextual factors influencing maternal, neonatal and children health (MNCH) care in Bangladesh, Nigeria and South Africa amidst the pandemic.
Rapid assessment on the utilization of maternal and child health services during COVID-19 in Rwanda

AUTHOR(S)
D. Wanyana; R. Wong; D. Hakizimana

Published: March 2021   Journal: Public Health Action
 This study aimed to assess the change in the utilization of maternal and child health (MCH) services during the COVID-19 outbreak. This was a cross-sectional quantitative study. During the COVID-19 outbreak in Rwanda, the utilization of 15 MCH services in all four categories—antenatal care (ANC), deliveries, postnatal care (PNC) and vaccinations—significantly declined.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 11 | Issue: 1 | No. of pages: 12-21 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: COVID-19, health care facilities, maternal and child health services, public health | Countries: Rwanda
Socio-demographic disparities in knowledge, practices, and ability to comply with COVID-19 public health measures in Canada

AUTHOR(S)
Gabrielle Brankston; Eric Merkley; David N. Fisman (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Canadian Journal of Public Health

The effectiveness of public health interventions for mitigation of the COVID-19 pandemic depends on individual attitudes, compliance, and the level of support available to allow for compliance with these measures. The aim of this study was to describe attitudes and behaviours towards the Canadian COVID-19 public health response, and identify risk-modifying behaviours based on socio-demographic characteristics. A cross-sectional online survey was administered in May 2020 to members of a paid panel representative of the Canadian population by age, gender, official language, and region of residence. A total of 4981 respondents provided responses for indicators of self-reported risk perceptions, attitudes, and behaviours towards COVID-19 public health measures

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on child health and the provision of Care in Paediatric Emergency Departments: a qualitative study of frontline emergency care staff

AUTHOR(S)
Ciara Conlon; Thérèse McDonnell; Michael Barrett (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: BMC Health Services Research
The COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent public health guidance to reduce the spread of the disease have wide-reaching implications for children’s health and wellbeing. Furthermore, paediatric emergency departments (EDs) have rapidly adapted provision of care in response to the pandemic. This qualitative study utilized insight from multidisciplinary frontline staff to understand 1) the changes in paediatric emergency healthcare utilization during COVID-19 2) the experiences of working within the restructured health system.
The impact of the lockdown and the re-opening of schools and day cares on the epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2 and other respiratory infections in children: a nationwide register study in Finland

AUTHOR(S)
Marjut Haapanen; Marjo Renko; Miia Artama (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: EClinicalMedicine
Nationwide restrictions started in Finland in March to prevent the spread of COVID-19, leading to school and day care closures. The aim of this study is to describe the effect of closures and re-openings on the respiratory pathogen epidemiology. Laboratory-confirmed cases of SARS-CoV-2; respiratory syncytial virus (RSV); influenza (A & B); parainfluenza-, adeno-, and rhinoviruses; Mycoplasma pneumoniae; and Streptococcus pneumoniae in children were collected from the National Infectious Disease Register over the period of 2017–2020. Weekly incidences (weeks 1 to 35) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated per 100 000 children in 2020 and compared by incidence rate ratios (IRRs) to corresponding periods in 2017−2019.
Impact of COVID-19 pandemic on maternal and child health services in Uttar Pradesh, India

AUTHOR(S)
Anil K. Singh; Pankaj K. Jain; Naresh P. Singh (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care
In the wake of the Covid-19 Pandemic, parts of the public health system at increased risk of reduced efficiency include healthcare services for women and children. This in turn could reverse all the progress achieved over the years in reducing maternal and child mortality. In this study, an attempt has been made to assess the indirect effect of the pandemic on maternal and child health services in public health facilities.
Cite this research | Vol.: 10 | Issue: 1 | No. of pages: 509-513 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: COVID-19 response, health services, maternal and child health services, pandemic, public health | Countries: India
A qualitative study of child and adolescent mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic in Ireland

AUTHOR(S)
Katriona O’Sullivan; Serena Clark; Amy McGrane (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Mitigating the adverse physical health risks associated with COVID-19 has been a priority of public health incentives. Less attention has been placed on understanding the psychological factors related to the global pandemic, especially among vulnerable populations. This qualitative study sought to understand the experiences of children and adolescents during COVID-19. This study interviewed 48 families during the COVID-19 pandemic restrictions, and a national lockdown, to understand its impacts.
Health at a glance: Latin America and the Caribbean 2020
This report presents key indicators on health and health systems in 33 Latin America and the Caribbean countries. This first Health at a Glance publication to cover the Latin America and the Caribbean region was prepared jointly by OECD and the World Bank. Analysis is based on the latest comparable data across almost 100 indicators including equity, health status, determinants of health, health care resources and utilisation, health expenditure and financing, and quality of care. The editorial discusses the main challenges for the region brought by the COVID‑19 pandemic, such as managing the outbreak as well as mobilising adequate resources and using them efficiently to ensure an effective response to the epidemic. An initial chapter summarises the comparative performance of countries before the crisis, followed by a special chapter about addressing wasteful health spending that is either ineffective or does not lead to improvement in health outcomes so that to direct saved resources where they are urgently needed.
Real-time communication: creating a path to COVID-19 public health activism in adolescents using social media

AUTHOR(S)
Kunmi Sobowale; Heather Hilliard; Martha J. Ignaszewski (et al.)

Published: December 2020   Journal: Journal of Medical Internet Research
The COVID-19 pandemic and related public health efforts limiting in-person social interactions present unique challenges to adolescents. Social media, which is widely used by adolescents, presents an opportunity to counteract these challenges and promote adolescent health and public health activism. However, public health organizations and officials underuse social media to communicate with adolescents. Using well-established risk communication strategies and insights from adolescent development and human-computer interaction literature, we identify current efforts and gaps, and propose recommendations to advance the use of social media risk communication for adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic and future disasters.
Integrating public health ethics into shared decision-making for children during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Angira Patel; Dalia M. Feltman; Erin Talati Paquette

Published: December 2020   Journal: The Journal of Pediatrics
This commentary examines how values typically prioritized in public health ethics such as solidarity and justice can be integrated into SDM, where the individual child's best interest and caregiver preferences are often paramount. Additionally, it suggests a framework to integrate public health ethics into the traditional shared decision-making continuum using 4 scenarios that are examined for risks, benefits, settings, and appropriate levels of directiveness.
Is vitamin D deficiency a risk factor for COVID‐19 in children?

AUTHOR(S)
Kamil Yılmaz; Velat Şen

Published: December 2020   Journal: Pediatric pulmonology

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) is a global health problem that can result in serious complications. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and clinical importance of vitamin D deficiency in children with COVID‐19.This study includes 40 patients who were diagnosed to have COVID‐19 and hospitalized with the real‐time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction method, 45 healthy matched control subjects with vitamin D levels. The age of admission, clinical and laboratory data, and 25‐hydroxycholecalciferol (25‐OHD) levels were recorded. Those with vitamin D levels which are below 20 ng/ml were determined as Group 1 and those with ≥20 ng/ml as Group 2.

Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 3595–3601 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, COVID-19, hospitalization, public health
Modeling the impact of school reopening on SARS-CoV-2 transmission using contact structure data from Shanghai

AUTHOR(S)
Benjamin Lee; John P. Hanley; Sarah Nowak (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: BMC Public Health

Mathematical modeling studies have suggested that pre-emptive school closures alone have little overall impact on SARS-CoV-2 transmission, but reopening schools in the background of community contact reduction presents a unique scenario that has not been fully assessed. This study adapted a previously published model using contact information from Shanghai to model school reopening under various conditions. It investigated different strategies by combining the contact patterns observed between different age groups during both baseline and “lockdown” periods. It also tested the robustness of this strategy to the assumption of lower susceptibility to infection in children under age 15 years.

Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 9 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, COVID-19, health policy, lockdown, public health, school attendance | Countries: China
31 - 45 of 53

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.