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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1 - 15 of 559
Children's Covid-19 writing and drawings and the existential imperative to educate for uncertainty

AUTHOR(S)
Perpetua Kirby; Michela Villani; Rebecca Webb

Published: May 2022   Journal: Children & Society
The Covid-19 pandemic provokes a pedagogic crisis: education is ill-adapted to accommodate multiple uncertainties in students' lives. This study examines how pandemic uncertainty is registered in a global collection of writing and drawing from 4 to 17-years-old, during the 2020 lockdowns. The study engages with Biesta's (2021) philosophical work on 'world-centred education', offering empirical examples from the collection that goes beyond the immediacy of everyday lives. It identifies educational implications: acknowledging students' present experiences of the world; a slowing of pedagogical tempo; supporting students to navigate desires and fears; a language for expressing uncertainty; and engaging students in ethical and existential difficulty.
Re-imaging everyday routines and educational aspirations under COVID-19 lockdown: narratives of urban middle-class children in Punjab, India

AUTHOR(S)
Ravinder Barn; Damanjit Sandhu; Utsa Mukherjee

Published: May 2022   Journal: Children & Society
Based on in-depth interviews with 24 middle-class Indian child participants, this is the first exploratory qualitative study, in India, to demonstrate the ways in which children as reflexive social actors re-negotiated everyday schedules, drew on classed resources at their disposal and made sense of the impact of the pandemic on their educational pathways and future aspirations. These narratives offer a unique lens on the politics of middle-classness and its constitutive relation to constructions of normative childhoods in contemporary India. Study findings contribute to the sociology of Indian childhood and more generally help enrich our understanding of southern childhoods and the reproduction of inequalities in contemporary India.
After-school programmes response to the COVID-19 pandemic: lessons learned from Barcelona, Spain

AUTHOR(S)
Txus Morata; Paco López; Eva Palasí (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Child & Family Social Work
This article explores the role of after-school programmes (ASPs) in serving underserved families in Barcelona, Spain, during the lockdown phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. Using a mixed-method approach, this exploratory study surveyed 31 directors of ASPs administered by the Pere Tarrés Foundation. These ASPs serve almost 2000 children living under the federal poverty level in Catalonia, Spain.
How did autistic children, and their parents, experience school transition during the Covid-19 pandemic?

AUTHOR(S)
Aimee Code; Laura Fox; Kathryn Asbury (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: The British Journal of Special Education
Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the start of the academic year in September 2020 was a unique time for those transitioning to a new school. This study aimed to explore the experiences of parents who supported autistic children making a range of different school transitions in 2020. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 13 parents of autistic children in the UK, and data were analyzed with reflexive thematic analysis. For some parents, the Covid-19 pandemic negatively impacted on aspects of school transitions. However, other parents expressed the view that these same circumstances created opportunities to approach the school transition in a unique, improved manner. This article sheds light on the heterogeneity of experiences and perceptions of parents of autistic children, and highlights the need to examine the impact of Covid-19 on school transitions, including practices that it may be advantageous to retain.
Supporting grandchildren's remote instruction during COVID-19: experiences of custodial grandmothers

AUTHOR(S)
Megan L. Dolbin-MacNab; Alexandra B. Jeanblanc; Carol M. Musil (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Psychology in the Schools
While negative impacts of COVID-19-related remote instruction on children continue to emerge, it appears that vulnerable students will disproportionately bear the burden. One such vulnerable population is children being raised by grandparents. The purpose of this mixed methods study was to gain insight into custodial grandmothers' (CGMs) experiences of their grandchildren's remote instruction, as well as individual and contextual factors associated with these experiences. A national sample of 315 CGMs, drawn from two randomized clinical trials, completed an online survey in Spring of 2020.
When home becomes classroom: The shifting roles of Korean immigrant mothers in the management of children's education during COVID-19 in the US

AUTHOR(S)
Gowoon Jung; Sejung Sage Yim; Sou Hyun Jang (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Women's Studies International Forum
COVID-19 has disrupted women's lives by increasing their childcare and household labor responsibilities. This has detrimentally affected immigrant women with limited resources, who invest in their children's education for upward mobility. Based on a content analysis of 478 posts on the MissyUSA website, this study explores the ways in which Korean immigrant mothers in the U.S. navigate the management of middle and high school children's online education during lockdown.
The effect of an educational intervention on COVID-19 awareness, preventive behaviors, and risk perceptions among secondary school students

AUTHOR(S)
Sadia Ibrar Khan; Mohi Ud Din; Syed Fawad Mashhadi (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: The Journal of Bahria University Medical and Dental College
 This study aimed to determine the impact of an educational intervention on secondary school students' Covid-19 awareness
and risk perception, as well as their preventive practices. A quasi-experimental study conducted in private secondary schools.
Methodology: The study duration was two months. Students who gave consent and didn’t have COVID-19 infection in
past were included by non-probability purposive sampling. Raosoft sample size calculator was used to calculate the sample
size and it came out to be 385 but a total of 380 students could be enrolled.
Parenting and children's behavior during the COVID 19 pandemic: mother's perspective

AUTHOR(S)
Jael Vargas Rubilar; María Cristina Richaud; Viviana Noemi Lemos (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Frontiers in Psychology
Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, many parents have felt anxious, overwhelmed, and stressed out due to the changes in education and family and working routines. This work aimed to (a) describe three dimensions of perceived parenting (positive parenting, parenting stress, and parental school support) in the COVID-19 pandemic context, (b) describe possible changes perceived by mothers in their children’s behavior during the social isolation phase, (c) analyze if behavioral changes vary according to the dimension of perceived parenting, and (d) analyze whether the characteristics of perceived parenting dimensions vary with mother’s age, number of children and number of work hours. The purposive sample consisted of 646 mothers of school-aged children in Argentina. Questionnaires on sociodemographic and work-related data, and on children’s behavior were administered, as well as an instrument (Vargas Rubilar et al., 2021) that assessed the three parenting dimensions (positive parenting, parenting stress, and parent-school support). The sociodemographic and work-related variables of the study were described using descriptive statistics: measures of central tendency, frequencies, and percentages.
Parents' perspectives toward school reopening during COVID-19 pandemic in Indonesia: a national survey

AUTHOR(S)
Antonius Hocky Pudjiadi; Nina Dwi Putri; Hikari Ambara Sjakti (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Frontiers in Public Health

All sectors are affected due to COVID-19 pandemic occurring worldwide, including the education industry. School closure had been taking place for more than a year in Indonesia. Despite the controversies, Indonesian government had decided to begin school reopening. This study aims to assess parental readiness for school reopening, and factors affecting parental attitude toward school reopening. A cross-sectional study using online questionnaire distributed via official Indonesian Pediatric Society (IPS) official social media account collected between March and April 2021. The questionnaire contained the general characteristics of study participants, parents' knowledge, and perspectives on COVID-19, and health protocols for school reopening.

Child wellbeing during COVID-19: a cross-sectional study from Pakistan

AUTHOR(S)
Fatima Shafiq; Shelina Bhamani; Komal Abdul Rahim (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: The Pakistan Journal of Medicine and Dentistry

The closure of schools because of the physical restrictions applied by the government has only amplified the hardships on children, parents, and teachers alike. Thus, this study aimed to assess parents’ perception of the impact of COVID on their young children. A cross-sectional survey was taken from the parents(n=128) parents of children ages 3-8 years, using a self-reported questionnaire. A tailored-made questionnaire google link was sent to the parents registered for the webinar.  The link had all the details pertinent to the ethical considerations for the use of data. SPSS was used andp˂0.05 was considered statistically significant.

Parental obstacles during distance learning mathematics in Indonesia: a phenomenology study

AUTHOR(S)
Muhamad Galang Isnawan; Didi Suryadi; Turmudi Turmudi (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: European Journal of Educational Research
The Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has caused an inevitable shift from face-to-face to distance learning, a phenomenon known as panic-gogy. Parents are the main students’ companions while studying at home. Although various studies show the constraints in this condition, few employ phenomenology that accurately describes people’s experience regarding a situation. Therefore, this study aimed to describe parents’ experience during distance learning mathematics using a phenomenology approach. The participants comprised 71 35-50-year-old parents of junior high school students. A Google form with open-ended questions was used as the main instrument in data collection. Data were analyzed using NVivo-12-assisted thematic analysis in coding, while source triangulation was used to strengthen the data trustworthiness.
Exploring teacher–parent relationships in times of Covid-19: teachers’ expectations and parental home-schooling strategies in a Flemish context

AUTHOR(S)
Marloes Hagenaars; Peter A. J. Stevens; Piet van Avermaet (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Teachers and Teaching
Previous research shows that the lockdown of schools due to the Covid-19 pandemic increased the already existing inequalities in education but little is known about the processes underlying these outcomes. In this study we used Bourdieu’s theories to explore how interactions between teachers’ expectations of parents and parents’ availability of cultural, social and economic capital could potentially influence educational inequalities in the context of distance education. The analysis is based on 24 qualitative interviews with parents from different social backgrounds, teachers and school coordinators, sampled from an inner-city primary school in Flanders (Belgium).
The growing digital divide in education among primary and secondary children during the COVID-19 pandemic: an overview of social exclusion and education equality issues

AUTHOR(S)
Ali Cheshmehzangi; Tong Zou; Zhaohui Su (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment
The growing digital divide issues due to the COVID-19 pandemic are critical to widening disparities and inequalities. Yet, only a few studies have explored the impacts of the digital divide on the education sector. In particular, there is a research gap related to younger students of primary and secondary schools. This study addresses this research gap by providing an overview of the digital divide’s impacts on social exclusion and education equality issues. In doing so, the study argues the effects of COVID-19 on the growing digital divide. Such influence is then studied based on the increasing education inequalities due to the digital divide and the eventual social exclusion increase among primary and secondary school children. The study explores the nexus between social exclusion and the digital divide before reflecting on EI as a type of social exclusion.
Lessons from United States school district policies and approaches to special education during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Melissa E. Mendoza; Timothy F. Brewer; Matthew S. Smith (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: International Journal of Inclusive Education
The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in many school districts in countries around the world transitioning rapidly to partial or complete remote learning. These disruptions affected all children’s education, but students with disabilities (SWDs) were particularly at-risk because of the challenges of providing accessible support and services through remote teaching programmes. This study examines the experience of SWDs in 24 United States school districts of instructional and adaptation models between August 2020 and February 2021. Districts varied in their approaches to remote instruction, compensatory services and prioritising SWDs for returning to the classroom before other students. Districts also varied substantially in the information provided regarding Distance Learning Plans, changes to Individualised Education Programmes and related service delivery.
Will teachers continue to teach online post-COVID-19?

AUTHOR(S)
Jaskiran Arora; Gurjeet Kaur Sahi; Nicholas Yates

Published: April 2022   Journal: Behaviour & Information Technology
Numerous studies have captured the experiences of teachers teaching online, but the current ‘emergency’ to teach online is unprecedented and has been challenging. Grounded in the theory of cognitive dissonance, this paper attempts to recapitulate the experiences of university teachers and analyses whether they have developed the consonant cognitions to teach online during the pandemic period or would they prefer switching back to ‘normal’ teaching as soon as the circumstances permit. Technology-enabled teaching has been found to be complex as it mandates teaching in a computerised setting and lacks an element of social interaction, which is at the heart of face-to-face teaching. Using Structural Equation Modelling, this study presents the determining factors that motivate teachers to embrace technology-driven teaching more convincingly.
1 - 15 of 559

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.