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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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226 - 240 of 285
Strengthening the online education ecosystem in India

AUTHOR(S)
Rammohan Khanapurkar; Shalini Bhorkar; Ketan Dandare (et al.)

Published: November 2020
The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted the formal schooling system in India, as it has across the globe, causing massive pressure on the online education sector. This paper analyses the state of digitalised education in India. It outlines current government guidelines on digital-mode schooling, and uses the case of Maharashtra’s five-year-old efforts at digitalising government schools to gauge preparedness for implementing the guidelines. It highlights systemic weaknesses in educators’ pedagogical capacities, critiques the assumption that the availability of digital tools is sufficient to cater to the requirements of online education, and calls for the creation of policies on online education that are context-specific.
Cite this research | No. of pages: 45 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: COVID-19 response, e-learning, remote learning, school attendance | Countries: India | Publisher: Observer Research Foundation
Working from home vs learning from home: a critical investigation and analysis during the COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Afzal Sayed Munna; M. Sadeque Imam Shaikh

Published: November 2020   Journal: Asian Journal of Education and Social Studies
The article aimed to make a critical investigation and analysis on working from home vs learning from home during the COVID-19. Small-scale research was conducted only targeting parents (having at least one school going child) to capture the view of how they deem the concept of working from home vs learning from home and whether there are any reservations among both concepts. The findings from the 36 respondents’ feedback suggest that parents often prefer working from home (wherever possible) but the same parent does not want their child to learn from home. The research shows that most parents believe remote working leads to higher productivity and leads to cost-effectiveness and remote learnings deteriorate creativity.
Barriers to distance learning during the COVID-19 outbreak: A qualitative review from parents’ perspective

AUTHOR(S)
Sawsan Abuhammad

Published: November 2020   Journal: Heliyon

The goal of this study was to review the content posted in available local Jordanian Facebook groups to explore the perceptions of parents regarding the challenges of distance learning faced by their children during the coronavirus outbreak in Jordan. The Facebook search engine was used to identify local Facebook groups. The search keywords included distance learning, parents, and Jordan. Several faculty professors reviewed the posts and discussion flow on distance learning posted in Facebook groups from March 15th to April 25th 2020.

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 6 | Issue: 11 | No. of pages: 5 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: child education, COVID-19 response, e-learning, remote learning, social distance, social media | Countries: Jordan
Holidays over: a review of actual COVID-19 school outbreaks up to September 2020

AUTHOR(S)
Victor Grech; Elizabeth Grech; Jeremy Borg Myatt

Published: October 2020   Journal: Early human development
In the absence of an effective vaccine and/or treatment, COVID-19 remains pandemic. It is only public health measures, such as social distancing (and these included school closures), that have prevented millions of infections and deaths. School closures followed a precautionary principle in that many previous epidemics (e.g. influenza) were mainly transmitted by children. This is supported by few studies and yet, these closures have significantly impacted parents and children. We are now in September 2020, with public health restrictions being lifted in an attempt to attenuate the negative economic impact of the pandemic. The easing of restrictions has led to a resurgence of COVID-19 in a second wave of infections. In the meantime, summer school holidays are coming to an end in the northern hemisphere and it is salutary to review the effects on viral surges due to school openings thus far. This review shows that as schools open, outbreaks that affect both pupils and staff occur probably due to failure to adhere to public health principles: hand washing, distancing etc.
The right to education and ICT during COVID-19: an international perspective

AUTHOR(S)
Luis Miguel Lázaro Lorente; Ana Ancheta Arrabal; Cristina Pulido-Montes

Published: October 2020   Journal: Sustainability
There is a lack of concluding evidence among epidemiologists and public health specialists about how school closures reduce the spread of COVID-19. Herein, we attend to the generalization of this action throughout the world, specifically in its quest to reduce mortality and avoid infections. Considering the impact on the right to education from a global perspective, this article discusses how COVID-19 has exacerbated inequalities and pre-existing problems in education systems around the world. Therefore, the institutional responses to guaranteeing remote continuity of the teaching–learning process during this educational crisis was compared regionally through international databases.
Sustainability analysis of the e-learning education system during pandemic period—COVID-19 in Romania

AUTHOR(S)
Constantin Aurelian Ionescu; Liliana Paschia; Nicoleta Luminita Gudanescu Nicolau (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Sustainability
The unprecedented situation of the COVID-19 pandemic has generated radical transformations of the Romanian education system, forcing teachers as well as students to adapt in a short time to new social conditions and to the online learning process. The paper analyzes the sustainability of the e-learning system implemented in Romania during the pandemic, and it is based on an opinion poll based on a questionnaire developed on three levels of schooling (middle school, high school, and university), analyzed from three perspectives, teachers–students–parents, and identifying the possible psychological effects on students, resulting from the corroboration of social isolation with the online continuation of the educational process. Although before the pandemic the e-learning system was rarely used by both students and teachers, the research results indicate that students have accepted online learning, even if they find it less attractive than the traditional education system.
A survey of parents of children attending the online classes during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Sandeep Grover; Sandeep Kumar Goyal; Aseem Mehra (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: The Indian Journal of Pediatrics

This cross-sectional survey, conducted in India, aims to assess the impact of online classes on the children and parents/guardians. It was conducted during the period of 21st June 2020 to 17th July 2020 among the guardians of children attending the online classes,

Evolution to online education around the globe during a SARS-CoV-2 Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic: do develop and underdeveloped cope alike?

AUTHOR(S)
Javaria Qazi; Khulla Naseer; Atika Qazi (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Children and Youth Services Review

Educational institutes around the globe in this 21st century is facing challenges of SARS-CoV-2 Coronavirus infectious disease. They are required to conduct online learning to avoid face to face contact in emergency scenarios such as COVID-19 pandemic and continuing academic year while keeping social distancing. Students need to adapt to new roles of learning through information technology to succeed in academics amid COVID-19. However, access to the impact of access & use of online learning resources, to what extent, these students are satisfied with online learning amid COVID-19 particularly in handling new challenges are critical to explore. Therefore, this paper aims to assess and compare the access & use of online learning of Bruneians and Pakistanis amid enforced lockdown imposed by the governments using a five-items satisfaction scale underlying existing literature.

Parenting activities and the transition to home-based education during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Shawna J. Lee; Kaitlin P. Ward; Olivia D. Chang (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Children and Youth Services Review
This study reports on parent-child dynamics following COVID-19 related school closures, based on cross-sectional analyses of a survey that utilized a convenience sampling approach. Data were collected approximately five weeks after the World Health Organization declared that the Coronavirus was a pandemic. Participants (N = 405) were adults recruited throughout the U.S. This study examines data from parents (69% mothers and 31% fathers) with at least one child 0-12 years of age.
When are we going to have the real school? A case study of early childhood education and care teachers’ experiences surrounding education during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Hem Chand Dayal; Lavinia Tiko

Published: October 2020   Journal: Australasian Journal of Early Childhood
In this study, we set out to explore how two private, early childhood education and care centres in a small island developing state in the Pacific are coping with schooling during the COVID-19 lockdown period. In particular, we used a case-study research approach to explore teachers’ feelings about the situation and what actions or strategies the centres have devised to continue to support education of young children. We also report on the challenges and opportunities that teachers have experienced in teaching remotely. The case studies suggest that teachers feel worried not only about their personal lives, but also about their professional lives as teachers. The findings also reveal how the two early childhood education and care centres innovate in delivering education in a time of severe crisis. Glimpses of success are visible in terms of making teaching and learning possible and meaningful even with very young children. These findings provide useful insights into teaching and learning during a pandemic.
COVID-19: the effect of lockdown on children’s remote learning experience: parents’ perspective

AUTHOR(S)
Datonye Christopher Briggs

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Education, Society and Behavioural Science
This online survey was done to explore parents’ perspectives on education of their children affected by the stay-at-home measures still ongoing in the country (Nigeria). A non-probability sampling technique was used in the recruitment of participants. The study questionnaire on a Google Doc Form was administered through WhatsApp instant messaging. Chi-square was used to test for differences, and statistical significance was set at p-value less than 0.05.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 33 | Issue: 9 | No. of pages: 42-52 | Language: French | Topics: Education | Tags: child education, COVID-19 response, parents, remote learning, school attendance | Countries: Nigeria
Save our future: averting an education catastrophe for the world’s children
Institution: Save the Children
Published: October 2020

At the time of writing, the world is facing an education catastrophe. The measures taken to prevent the spread of COVID-19 has impacted education for children all over the world. Due to school closures, hundreds of millions of children are not learning or getting services that are vital for their development and well-being. Many of the world’s children were not learning even before the pandemic, and without rapid action, this learning crisis is likely to spread. This paper sets out seven priority action areas to deliver changes crucial to advert an education catastrophe for the world's children.

Learning losses in Pakistan due to COVID-19 school closures: a technical note on simulation results

AUTHOR(S)
Koen Geven; Amer Hasan

Published: October 2020
Pakistan was among the first countries in the world to institute widespread school closures as a result of Coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19). This note presents results from a series of simulations that aim to capture the impacts that school closures in Pakistan may have on the learning levels, enrollment, and future earnings of children and students. In this note, the authors present an overview of how these numbers are calculated and how to interpret them. This note draws on a simulation exercise for all countries on which data is available, including Pakistan, conducted by researchers at the World Bank.
Cite this research | No. of pages: 9 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: child education, educational policy, remote learning, school attendance | Countries: Pakistan | Publisher: World Bank
Psychiatric and general health effects of COVID‐19 pandemic on children with chronic lung disease and parents' coping styles

AUTHOR(S)
Dilber Ademhan Tural; Nagehan Emiralioglu; Selma Tural Hesapcioglu (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Pediatric Pulmonology
This study aims to assess the anxiety and depressive symptoms related to the COVID‐19 pandemic in children with chronic lung disease and their parents and also to evaluate parents' coping strategies. Parents of children aged 4–18 years, with chronic lung disease and healthy control were enrolled in the study. General Health Questionnaire‐12, specific COVID‐19 related anxiety questions, The Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced inventory, coronavirus‐related psychiatric symptom scale in children–parental form were used to analyze the psychiatric effects of COVID‐19. Parents were also asked about how online education affected their family life and children. All data were compared between children/parents in the study and control groups. Risk factors related with anxiety scores of children were also analyzed.
Considerations for school-related public health measures in the context of COVID-19
Institution: *UNICEF, UNESCO, WHO - World Health Organization
Published: September 2020

This Annex is intended to help policy makers and educators with making decisions on running schools as safely as possible during the COVID-19 pandemic. At the forefront of all considerations and decisions should be the continuity of education for children for their  overall  well-being,  health  and  safety.  Nonetheless,  all  decisions  will  have  implications  for  children,  parents  or  caregivers,  teachers and other staff and more broadly, their communities and societies. This document was developed with input from the Technical Advisory Group (TAG) of Experts on Educational Institutions and COVID-19 and experts from WHO, UNICEF, and UNESCO, who jointly reviewed the latest evidence to develop this interim guidance, which considers equity, resource implications, and feasibility.

226 - 240 of 285

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.