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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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16 - 30 of 149
What is missing in our teacher education practices: a collaborative self-study of teacher educators with children during the Covid-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Jinhee Kim; Su Jeong Wee; Sohyun Meacham

Published: March 2021
This self-study explores the experiences and challenges that mothers of young children and teacher educators have faced during the COVID-19 pandemic. While describing what children experienced through remote learning and how their mothers tried to support their learning, this study reflects on their former school experiences and teacher's education practices. To do this, it addresses the following two research questions: (1) What were children’s experiences in remote learning during the pandemic?; and (2) What were mothers and teacher educators experiences in supporting children’s remote learning during the pandemic? Adopting a collaborative self-study methodology, the study collected stories of mothers and teachers during children’s remote learning. These data were collected through participant observations, field notes, and artifacts that children created, as well as learning materials received from their teachers and schools during the period.
Study of parent’s satisfaction for online classes under lockdown due to COVID-19 in India

AUTHOR(S)
Itisha Sharma; Deepti Kiran

Published: March 2021   Journal: Journal of Statistics and Management Systems
The Coronavirus pandemic has severely impacted all the operations that demanded physical presence. In the process of encouraging social distancing, the didactic sector has also undergone huge transformation by shifting online. There has been an orbital shift in the instructional and pedagogical technology to keep pace with the current dynamic crisis. The teachers and administration of K-12 schools are working hard to ensure quality education to students but the major stakeholder who is the parent of the child might not be satisfied. Following an extensive literature review, we realized that there is limited research on parent satisfaction with respect to online classes by schools, especially in Indian context. Parents are the ultimate stakeholders and contributors to a child’s life and future, therefore understanding their level of contentment is paramount. The research aims at understanding the level of contentment of parents with online classes offered by schools to their wards during the corona pandemic lockdown in India.
A cross-sectional study of anxiety, stress, perception and mental health towards online learning of school children in India during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Priyanka Harjule; Azizur Rahman; Basant Agarwal

Published: March 2021   Journal: Journal of Interdisciplinary Mathematics
The unprecedented outbreak of coronavirus disease has been spread across the world, affecting the lifestyle of the people. It has significantly changed the way of global education and the teaching-learning process. The aim of this study is to provide a broad insight into the awareness characteristics, attitudes and perceived mental health of the school children and their parents towards online learning in India during 2019-nCoV pandemic. The results of this cross-sectional study showed that there is a significant difference between the preferred modes of learning online or traditional classroom methods during the pandemic. A significant increase in the screen times of school children was observed while learning online under school closure scenario.

Scoping exercise to develop a storybook to support children’s education during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Rowshonara Syeda; Magdalena Hann; Rosalie Allison

Published: March 2021   Journal: BMJ Paediatrics Open
In June 2020, as COVID-19 lockdown measures were eased in the UK, this scoping exercise aimed to rapidly identify topics to cover within a children’s online storybook ‘My Back to School Bubble’, designed to support the return to school.
Exploring the need for a responsive school curriculum to cope with the Covid-19 pandemic in Pakistan

AUTHOR(S)
Rani Gul; Gulab Khilji

Published: March 2021   Journal: Prospects
The article investigates the response of the Pakistani curriculum to the Covid19 outbreak. It also looks into the development of a curriculum that addresses the specifcities of students’ situations, while reminding them of global connectedness. The article is based on semi-structured interviews with 10 curriculum experts, 20 principals, and 35 teachers, as well as content analysis of the 2018 National Curriculum Framework of Pakistan.
The impact of COVID-19 on student learning in New South Wales primary schools: an empirical study

AUTHOR(S)
Jennifer Gore; Leanne Fray; Andrew Miller (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Australian educational researcher
The COVID-19 pandemic produced widespread disruption to schooling, impacting 90% of the world’s students and moving entire school systems to remote and online learning. In the state of New South Wales, Australia, most students engaged in learning from home for at least eight weeks, with subsequent individual and intermittent school closures. However, while numerous claims have circulated in the popular media and in think tank reports, internationally, about the negative impacts on learning, there is limited empirical evidence of decreased student achievement. Drawing on data from more than 4800 Year 3 and 4 students from 113 NSW government schools, this paper compares student achievement during 2019 and 2020 in a sample of matched schools to examine the effects of the system-wide disruption.
COVID-19 and school closures: one year of education disruption
Institution: *UNICEF
Published: March 2021

We are facing a COVID-19 education crisis. As this report finds, schools for more than 168 million children globally have been closed for almost a full year. With every day that goes by, these children will fall further behind and the most vulnerable will pay the heaviest price. The unique findings presented in this report provide an overview of school closures from March 11, 2020 to February 2, 2021 in more than 200 countries and territories, relying primarily on the data from the UNESCO tracker of school closures and UIS database on school enrollment. As we enter the second year of the COVID-19 pandemic, no effort should be spared to keep schools open or prioritize them in reopening plans. Children cannot afford another year of school closures.

The attitudes of elementary and middle school students and teachers towards online learning during the corona pandemic outbreak

AUTHOR(S)
Asmahan Masry‑Herzallah; Yuliya Stavissky

Published: February 2021   Journal: SN Social Sciences
The coronavirus pandemic has impacted the education systems worldwide and most, including the Israeli, have transitioned to online learning. Moreover, closing schools has extreme social, cultural, educational and economic implications on the student, teacher and parent populations. This is especially true for students from families of lower-socio-economic status and young students who need parental assistance. Furthermore, online learning is not suitable for all teachers, because some lack the technological capabilities needed.
Serving children and adolescents in need during the COVID-19 pandemic: evaluation of service-learning subjects with and without face-to-face interaction

AUTHOR(S)
Li Lin; Daniel T. L. Shek

Published: February 2021   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak has posed a great challenge to teaching and learning activities in higher education, particularly for service-learning subjects that involve intensive human interaction. Although service-learning may be transformed to a virtual mode in response to the pandemic, little is known about the impact of this new mode on student learning and well-being. This paper reports a university credit-bearing service-learning subject that involves services toward needy children and adolescents in a non-face-to-face mode under COVID-19 pandemic. The study examined the effectiveness of this subject by comparing it with the same subject delivered via a face-to-face mode.
Widening the gap? Unintended consequences of health promotion measures for young people during COVID-19 lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Stephanie A. Alexander; Martine Shareck

Published: February 2021   Journal: Health Promotion International
During the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, global measures preventing the spread of the new coronavirus required most of the population to lockdown at home. This sudden halt to collective life meant that non-essential services were closed and many health promoting activities (i.e. physical activity, school) were stopped in their tracks. To curb the negative health impacts of lockdown measures, activities adapting to this new reality were urgently developed. One form of activity promoted indoor physical activity to prevent the adverse physical and psychological effects of the lockdown. Another form of activity included the rapid development of online learning tools to keep children and youth engaged academically while not attending school. While these health promoting efforts were meant to benefit the general population, this paper argues that these interventions may have unintended consequences and inadvertently increase health inequalities affecting marginalized youth in particular, as they may not reap the same benefits, both social and physical, from the interventions promoting athome physical activities or distance learning measures. This study elaborates on several interventions and their possible unintended consequences for marginalized youth and suggests several strategies that may mitigate their impact.
A literature review of the effects of social networking sites on secondary school students’ academic achievement

AUTHOR(S)
Melese Astatke; Cathy Weng; Sufen Chen

Published: February 2021   Journal: Interactive Learning Environments
Due to COVID- 19 pandemic, schools all over the world have gone from full face-to-face to online lessons. This paper analyzed the influences of social networking sites (SNS) on secondary school students’ academic achievement. The original studies were extracted from the Web of Science database, and the review of the 27 selected journal articles revealed that the use of SNS is both positively and negatively related to secondary school students’ academic achievement. However, it was found that few studies have reported the positive impacts of SNS use on students’ academic achievement. On the contrary, several studies have shown that excessive usage of SNS, inappropriate SNS use, and usage of SNS for other recreational activities instead of educational purposes harmed students’ academic achievement.
Technology-enabled remote learning during COVID-19: perspectives of Australian teachers, students and parents

AUTHOR(S)
Lee-Ann Ewing; Holly B. Cooper

Published: February 2021   Journal: Technology, Pedagogy and Education
The majority of Australian students learned remotely in term two (April–June 2020), in response to state government directives to close schools during the ‘first wave’ of Covid-19. This created myriad challenges for students, teachers and parents. Accordingly, this study seeks to capture these multiple perspectives of the remote learning experience. Forty interviews were conducted at the end of term two, with students, teachers and parents. The findings represent an integrated framework for engagement in the context of remote education.
School off, learning on: identification of preference and challenges among school students towards distance learning during COVID19 outbreak

AUTHOR(S)
Subreen al Salman; Mohammed Alkathiri; Ali Khaled Bawaneh

Published: February 2021   Journal: International Journal of Lifelong Education
Since continuing learning draws on education, wherever it is available, no matter by whom provided, it is clear that programmes offered by formal education institutions are only one of many sources and options. The current study aimed at identification students’ preferable levels and challenges of using distance learning in COVID-19. The sample comprised of 720 students. The researchers adopted a questionnaire and verified its validity and reliability.
“What if…it never ends?”: examining challenges in primary teachers' experience during the wholly online teaching

AUTHOR(S)
Zhuo Wang; Jia Zhou; Yubin Ma (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: The Journal of Educational Research
Since the outbreak of Covid-19, the Chinese government has issued strict policies for school operations. To meet the demands of normal school schedule while at home, teachers have been required to provide fully online classes regardless of their previous experience. Understanding and describing the authentic challenges teachers face during the wholly online learning and teaching period may not only allow stakeholders to make more informed decisions about subsequent practices, but also provide timely lessons for primary schools in other regions combating similar challenges. The present study was a phenomenological study, in which 26 Chinese primary school teachers were interviewed and provided photos that represented their typical online teaching experience.
The impact of COVID-19 pandemic outbreak on education and mental health of Chinese children aged 7–15 years: an online survey

AUTHOR(S)
Zhongren Ma; Sakinah Idris; Yinxia Zhang (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: BMC Pediatrics
The emerging of psychological problems triggered by COVID-19 particularly in children have been extensively highlighted and emphasized, but original research in this respect is still lagging behind. Therefore, this study has been designed to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on mental health and the effectiveness and attitudes towards online education among Chinese children aged 7–15 years.
16 - 30 of 149

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.