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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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Save our future: averting an education catastrophe for the world’s children
Institution: Save the Children
Published: October 2020

At the time of writing, the world is facing an education catastrophe. The measures taken to prevent the spread of COVID-19 has impacted education for children all over the world. Due to school closures, hundreds of millions of children are not learning or getting services that are vital for their development and well-being. Many of the world’s children were not learning even before the pandemic, and without rapid action, this learning crisis is likely to spread. This paper sets out seven priority action areas to deliver changes crucial to advert an education catastrophe for the world's children.

Learning losses in Pakistan due to COVID-19 school closures: a technical note on simulation results

AUTHOR(S)
Koen Geven; Amer Hasan

Published: October 2020
Pakistan was among the first countries in the world to institute widespread school closures as a result of Coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19). This note presents results from a series of simulations that aim to capture the impacts that school closures in Pakistan may have on the learning levels, enrollment, and future earnings of children and students. In this note, the authors present an overview of how these numbers are calculated and how to interpret them. This note draws on a simulation exercise for all countries on which data is available, including Pakistan, conducted by researchers at the World Bank.
Cite this research | No. of pages: 9 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: child education, educational policy, remote learning, school attendance | Countries: Pakistan | Publisher: World Bank
Psychiatric and general health effects of COVID‐19 pandemic on children with chronic lung disease and parents' coping styles

AUTHOR(S)
Dilber Ademhan Tural; Nagehan Emiralioglu; Selma Tural Hesapcioglu (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Pediatric Pulmonology
This study aims to assess the anxiety and depressive symptoms related to the COVID‐19 pandemic in children with chronic lung disease and their parents and also to evaluate parents' coping strategies. Parents of children aged 4–18 years, with chronic lung disease and healthy control were enrolled in the study. General Health Questionnaire‐12, specific COVID‐19 related anxiety questions, The Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced inventory, coronavirus‐related psychiatric symptom scale in children–parental form were used to analyze the psychiatric effects of COVID‐19. Parents were also asked about how online education affected their family life and children. All data were compared between children/parents in the study and control groups. Risk factors related with anxiety scores of children were also analyzed.
Considerations for school-related public health measures in the context of COVID-19
Institution: *UNICEF, UNESCO, WHO - World Health Organization
Published: September 2020

This Annex is intended to help policy makers and educators with making decisions on running schools as safely as possible during the COVID-19 pandemic. At the forefront of all considerations and decisions should be the continuity of education for children for their  overall  well-being,  health  and  safety.  Nonetheless,  all  decisions  will  have  implications  for  children,  parents  or  caregivers,  teachers and other staff and more broadly, their communities and societies. This document was developed with input from the Technical Advisory Group (TAG) of Experts on Educational Institutions and COVID-19 and experts from WHO, UNICEF, and UNESCO, who jointly reviewed the latest evidence to develop this interim guidance, which considers equity, resource implications, and feasibility.

The hidden impact of COVID-19 on child education

AUTHOR(S)
Mya Gordon; Melissa Burgess; Munshi Sulaiman (et al.)

Institution: Save the Children
Published: September 2020
This report is one in a series presenting findings from the Global COVID-19 Research Study. The results presented in this study focus on implications for children’s education, drawing on data from our representative sample of 17,565 parents and caregivers and 8,069 children in our programme participants’ group. The research presents differences in impacts on and needs of children by region, age, gender, disability, minority group, indicators of poverty and more. The research was implemented in 46 countries and resulted in the largest and most comprehensive survey of children and families during the COVID-19 crisis to date, with 31,683 parents and caregivers and 13,477 children aged between 11 and 17 participating in the research.
The hidden impact of COVID-19 on child protection and well-being

AUTHOR(S)
Daniela Ritz; Georgina O’Hare; Melissa Burgess (et al.)

Institution: Save the Children
Published: September 2020
This report is one in a series presenting findings from the Global COVID-19 Research Study. The results presented here focus on the implications for Child Protection issues, drawing on data from our representative sample of 17,565 parents/caregivers and 8,069 children in our programme participants group. Comparisons with our general public sample have been made in some places.Topics investigated include violence occurring in the home, the separation of children from their caregivers, mental health and psycho-social well-being of caregivers and children, child labour, online safety and child protection support and services. Available data was analysed and presented considering the socio-ecological model in order to highlight the interconnectedness of the broader socio-ecological environment which places children within their households and communities. This enabled the detailing of the range of associated risks and protective factors in relation to these child protection issues as well as drawing attention to the complexity of their interrelationship. Differences in impact and the needs of children by region, age, gender, disability, minority group, indicators of poverty, and more, were explored.
Technology for educational purposes among low-income latino children living in a mobile park in Silicon Valley: a case study before and during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Claire Ji Hee Kim; Amado M. Padilla

Published: September 2020   Journal: Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences
This case study explores the role of technology in education among low-income Latino residents living in a mobile park in Silicon Valley. Through surveys and in-person interviews with parents and children, qualitative data on home Internet access and availability of technological devices utilized for school-related purposes are reported. The results of this study indicate that despite having a baseline level of access to technology as well as an understanding of its importance in the context of a child’s education, our study population currently faces significant barriers to having adequate access to technology at home due to socioeconomic barriers.
The impact of lockdown on the learning gap: family and school divisions in times of crisis

AUTHOR(S)
Xavier Bonal; Sheila González

Published: September 2020   Journal: International Review of Education
The lockdown of schools in Spain to confront the effects of COVID-19 caused an enormous impact at both societal and educational levels. Schools and families had to react rapidly to a new teaching and learning scenario without the benefit of previous planning or government guidelines. In this context, some schools were better able to adapt to the new circumstances than others. Likewise, the structure and size of families’ economic, social and cultural capital produced significant differences in the learning opportunities for children from different backgrounds. This article assesses the impact of the school lockdown on the learning gap between children from different social backgrounds in Catalonia.
Analysis of learning activities for children using smart phone applications in private schools

AUTHOR(S)
Sanaullah Memon; Hidayatullah Shaikh; Qadir Bux Rind (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Indian Journal of Science and Technology
Smart phone applications are the debatable and burning issue of different organizations during Covid-19, which is focusing on learning activities of students. This paper aims to implement the Smart phone applications towards the learning activities of both primary and secondary level education. Primary data was collected by firsthand (Primary source of information) producing the set of questions in English language consisting of two factors of variables using five point measuring scale (strongly agree, agree, neutral, disagree, and strongly disagree). Whereas, Secondary data has also been used for literature review that justifies our research work; in the light of numerous academic articles of various authors.
COVID-19 disease pandemic lockdown: schools closure and students e-learning options in Tanzania

AUTHOR(S)
Fabian G. Mahundu

Published: September 2020
The purpose of this paper is to explore the learning options adopted by students during the closure of schools due to the COVID-19 disease pandemic in Tanzania. It examines the way learners harness the advantage of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), and the role played by parents and guardians at home in supporting their children during the COVID-19 lockdown.
Education in times of COVID-19 pandemic: academic stress and its psychosocial impact on children and adolescents in India

AUTHOR(S)
Ananya Mahapatra; Prerna Sharma

Published: September 2020   Journal: International Journal of Social Psychiatry
The novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has been declared by the World Health Organisation as an international public health emergency. Owing to its high infectivity, countries all over the world implemented nationwide lockdowns with the hope of flattening the epidemic curve. Around the world, this has led to the closure of schools in over 150 countries affecting the education of nearly 1 billion children. India faced total lockdown from 24th March 2020 to May 2020 and even though a phased re-opening of public services has since then been attempted, most educational institutions including schools and colleges remain closed without a clear view regarding their re-opening. This paper discusses the various psychosocial issues that have emerged leading to academic stress amongst children and adolescent students and its potential to lead to short and long-term psychological morbidity.
An analysis of child-care and school outbreak data and evidence-based recommendations for opening schools & keeping them open

AUTHOR(S)
Fiona Russell; Kathryn Snow; Margie Danchin (et al.)

Published: September 2020
This report is an analysis of the global literature and available Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) and school outbreak data, 25 January 2020 – 31 August 2020. It aims to explore the role of ECEC and schools in transmission of SARS-CoV-2.
Surveillance of COVID-19 school outbreaks, Germany, March to August 2020

AUTHOR(S)
Eveline Otte im Kampe; Ann-Sophie Lehfeld; Silke Buda (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Eurosurveillance
Mitigation of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in Germany included school closures in early March 2020. After reopening in April, preventive measures were taken in schools. This paper analyses national surveillance system data on COVID-19 school outbreaks during different time periods. After reopening, smaller outbreaks (average: 2.2/week) occurred despite low incidence in the general population. School closures might have a detrimental effect on children and should be applied only cautiously and in combination with other measures.
The effects of online homeschooling on children, parents, and teachers of grades 1-9 during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Ying Zhao; Yong Guo; Yu Xiao (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Medical Science Monitor
Beginning in the 2020 spring semester, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, all school-age children in China were homeschooled via live/recorded broadcasts, online group communication, and software-based homework submission. This study assessed the effects of and proper preparation for this educational approach.
Young children's online learning during COVID-19 pandemic: Chinese parents' beliefs and attitudes

AUTHOR(S)
Chuanmei Dong; Simin Cao; Hui Li

Published: September 2020
This study surveyed 3275 Chinese parents’ beliefs and attitudes around young children’s online learning during the lockdown of the COVID-19 pandemic. Most parents (92.7%) in the study reported that their children had online learning experiences during the pandemic, and many (84.6%) spent less than a half-hour each time. The parents generally had negative beliefs about the values and benefits of online learning and preferred traditional learning in early childhood settings.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 118 | No. of pages: 9 | Topics: Education | Tags: e-learning, lockdown, remote learning, school attendance | Countries: China
736 - 750 of 784

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.