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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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Transitioning a home-based, motivational interviewing intervention among families to remote delivery during the COVID-19 pandemic: key lessons learned

AUTHOR(S)
Lisa Tang; Rebecca Lewis; Julia Broad (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Patient Education and Counseling
This study examined the experiences, learnings, and strategies of Health Educators (HE) as they transitioned from a home-based model for motivational interviewing (MI) to remote delivery during COVID-19. The overall goal of this paper is to identify key lessons learned to help inform future delivery of remote MI delivery.
Assessment of duplicate evidence in systematic reviews of imaging Findings of children with COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Giordano Pérez-Gaxiola; Francisca Verdugo-Paiva; Gabriel Rada (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: JAMA Network Open
Formulating evidence-based recommendations for children affected by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is challenging. Identifying and synthesizing the evidence to inform these recommendations has become difficult. With the explosion of publications on preprint servers and in journals, waste in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) research is common. While replication of systematic reviews may be appropriate in some instances, duplication refers to needless repetition of the same review.1 Answering simple questions, such as the most common findings in children with COVID-19, requires an enormous effort. We aimed to map 1 of these questions (ie, what is the spectrum and frequency of imaging findings in children with COVID-19?) to illustrate the overlap and shortcomings of the evidence syntheses in this area.
Co-researching with children in the time of COVID-19: shifting the narrative on methodologies to generate knowledge

AUTHOR(S)
Patricio Cuevas-Parra

Published: December 2020   Journal: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
Children and young people’s participation in decision-making has substantially increased in the last 3 decades; although, their participation in research has been more problematic due to traditional views that exclude them from the realm of knowledge generation. This article critically reflects on the way that 12 children and young people engaged as co-researchers in an intergenerational research project that explored the perspectives of children and young people during the COVID-19 outbreak. Drawing upon the experiences of these child researchers, the author discusses the methodological and ethical complexities of their engagement—which is already a disputed topic—in the context of the global health crisis characterized by lockdowns, isolation, and social distancing.
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Research on violence against children during the COVID-19 pandemic
Institution: *UNICEF
Published: October 2020 UNICEF Publication
Research and data are important to draw attention to the experiences of children during the COVID-19 pandemic, to advocate for a range of protection services to be available during the crisis and beyond, and to inform the design of violence against children (VAC) prevention and response programmes. That said, the need for evidence must be balanced against the substantial risks to children, families and even researchers participating in violence-related research and data collection efforts. These risks are always present, but are likely to be amplified in the context of COVID-19, which may require rapid research, often via remote methods such as mobile phones or the Internet. This new UNICEF publication, Research on Violence against Children during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Guidance to inform ethical data collection and evidence generation, addresses key questions on generating VAC evidence that may arise during the pandemic and includes a decision tree (below) to guide those considering conducting research and data collection on VAC during COVID-19.

 
Missing school-based data due to COVID-19: some guidelines

AUTHOR(S)
Jessica A. R. Logan

Published: September 2020
In the wake of a global pandemic, most school buildings closed for the 2019-2020 school year two or three months early, while universities and research firms forced all in-person data collection to stop. Education scientists testing the efficacy or effectiveness of particular interventions were forced to abruptly stop data collection prior to collecting the critical data on children’s end-of school year progress. Methodological researchers have spent years developing ways to accommodate missing data into research strategies, both retrospectively and prospectively. In this research note, I discuss the potential educational research scenarios, and how missing data theory and methods can be applied to data collected during COVID-19 school year, allowing researchers to maximize the time, effort, and resources invested in their previously collected data.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.