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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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The evolution of COVID-19 publications in pediatrics: a bibliometric analysis with research trends and global productivity

AUTHOR(S)
İlknur Kaba; Nurcan Çoşkun

Published: August 2022   Journal: Medical Science and Discovery

Despite the increase in the number of global studies on COVID-19 that has been increasingly contagious among children, no comprehensive bibliometric studies have been found in the literature concerning COVID-19 in pediatrics. This study aimed to perform a holistic analysis of the scientific outputs about COVID-19 in pediatrics using various statistical methods. The articles published in the research area of pediatrics on COVID-19 between January 1st, 2020 and February 13th, 2022 were downloaded from the Web of Science (WoS) and analysed using various statistical methods. Spearman's correlation analysis was performed for related research. Bibliometric network visualization diagrams were generated to reveal trending topics and cross-country collaborations.

Youth as researchers: exploring the impact of COVID-19 on youth; global policy brief
Institution: UNESCO
Published: June 2022

The Youth As Researchers (YAR) initiative is a youth development programme, designed to ensure, support,  and  advance  youth  voices.  It  provides  training  and  mentoring  that  supports  youth  to  design  and  conduct  social  research,  with  a  view  to  informing  policy-making,  programme  design  and future research.The  initiative  was  first  conceived  by  the  UNESCO  Chair  on  Children,  Youth  and  Civic  Engagement  (Ireland), as a model to engage vulnerable youth in re-designing their own futures. It is premised on the  belief  that  no-one  knows  better  than  young  people  themselves  about  their  problems,  and  the  solutions that will work for them. It gained traction in the current context, as UNESCO’s Member States are looking for innovative ways to address the challenges youth are facing. In engaging with the Social and Human Science Sector, and with UNESCO’s field offices, the youth-led research agenda delivered a strong message on the need to underpin policy decisions with scientific facts, and to ensure civil society is consulted on the issues at hand.

Kindergarten practitioners' perspectives on intergenerational programs in Norwegian kindergartens during the COVID-19 pandemic: exploring transitions and transformations in institutional practices

AUTHOR(S)
Czarecah Tuppil Oropilla; Elin Eriksen Ødegaard; Gloria Quinones (et al.)

Published: May 2022   Journal: European Early Childhood Education Research Journal
Intergenerational programs have benefits for both children and older adults; however, the ongoing pandemic has changed social situations across the globe. The focus of this article is on exploring transitions and transformations due to societal conditions and demands that drive the implementation of intergenerational programs during a time of a global crisis that is the COVID-19 pandemic. Through an online survey form and focus group discussion, a total of 64 kindergarten practitioners shared their perspectives on intergenerational programs between young children and older adults in kindergartens in Norway. Kindergarten practitioners identified challenges that hinder intergenerational programs in kindergarten settings during the pandemic, as well as conditions that facilitate its implementation. Implications from this research indicate the need to think differently to be able to provide children with intergenerational experiences in kindergarten settings in Norway even during the pandemic and beyond.
Harnessing the power of telemedicine to accomplish international pediatric outcome research during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Sarah B. Mulkey; Margarita Arroyave-Wessel; Colleen Peyton (et al.)

Published: December 2021   Journal: Journal of telemedicine and telecare
The COVID-19 pandemic occurred during planned neurodevelopmental follow-up of Colombian children with antenatal Zika-virus exposure. The objective of the study was to leverage the institution's telemedicine infrastructure to support international clinical child outcome research. In a prospective cohort study of child neurodevelopment (NCT04398901), we used synchronous telemedicine to remotely train a research team and perform live observational assessments of children in Sabanalarga, Colombia. An observational motor and conceptional standardized tool kit was mailed to Colombia; other materials were translated and emailed; team training was done virtually. Children were recruited by team on the ground. Synchronous activities were video-recorded directly to two laptops, each with a telehealth Zoom link to allow simultaneous evaluation of "table" and "standing" activities, and backup recordings were captured directly on the device in Colombia.
Improving clinical paediatric research and learning from COVID-19: recommendations by the Conect4Children expert advice group

AUTHOR(S)
Neena Modi; Saskia N. de Wildt (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: Pediatric Research

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a devastating impact on multiple aspects of healthcare, but has also triggered new ways of working, stimulated novel approaches in clinical research and reinforced the value of previous innovations. Conect4children (c4c, www.conect4children.org) is a large collaborative European network to facilitate the development of new medicines for paediatric populations, and is made up of 35 academic and 10 industry partners from 20 European countries, more than 50 third parties, and around 500 affiliated partners. This study summarises aspects of clinical research in paediatrics stimulated and reinforced by COVID-19 that the Conect4children group recommends regulators, sponsors, and investigators retain for the future, to enhance the efficiency, reduce the cost and burden of medicines and non-interventional studies, and deliver research-equity.

Impact of COVID-19 on pediatric clinical research

AUTHOR(S)
Nhu N. Tran; Michelle Tran; Jeraldine Lopez (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: Journal of Pediatric Nursing
Many public institutions and settings have taken action to limit exposure to and slow the spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19). This paper sought to characterize the impact of stay-at-home orders on the study of cerebral autoregulation and its association with developmental delays in infants with congenital heart disease compared with healthy controls.
New methodologies for conducting maternal, infant, and child nutrition research in the era of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Jacqueline F. Gould; Karen Best; Merryn J. Netting (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Nutrients
The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak rapidly became a worldwide pandemic in early 2020. In Australia, government-mandated restrictions on non-essential face-to-face contact in the healthcare setting have been crucial for limiting opportunities for COVID-19 transmission, but they have severely limited, and even halted, many research activities. This institute’s research practices in the vulnerable populations of pregnant women and young infants needed to adapt in order to continue without exposing participants, or staff, to an increased risk of exposure to COVID-19. Here, are discuss pre-and-post COVID-19 methods for conducting research regarding nutrition during pregnancy, infancy, and early childhood.
Research consent rates before and during a COVID-19 one-visitor policy in a children’s hospital

AUTHOR(S)
Sara L. Van Driest; Sarita M. Madell; Kimberly Crum (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Pediatric Research
The COVID-19 pandemic has already had widespread effects on healthcare and health-related research worldwide. Early phase responses to the pandemic included restriction of clinical care and research to essential, time-sensitive and COVID-related activities in many institutions. With the re-introduction of clinical services, a number of strategies were imposed to minimize viral transmission to patients and healthcare personnel, such as strict limits on visitors/caregivers in pediatric inpatient facilities, which may have ethical implications on family-centered care. This study investigates consent rates for a clinical research study before and after implementation of a one-visitor policy at our children’s hospital.
Co-researching with children in the time of COVID-19: shifting the narrative on methodologies to generate knowledge

AUTHOR(S)
Patricio Cuevas-Parra

Published: December 2020   Journal: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
Children and young people’s participation in decision-making has substantially increased in the last 3 decades; although, their participation in research has been more problematic due to traditional views that exclude them from the realm of knowledge generation. This article critically reflects on the way that 12 children and young people engaged as co-researchers in an intergenerational research project that explored the perspectives of children and young people during the COVID-19 outbreak. Drawing upon the experiences of these child researchers, the author discusses the methodological and ethical complexities of their engagement—which is already a disputed topic—in the context of the global health crisis characterized by lockdowns, isolation, and social distancing.
The urgent need for research coordination to advance knowledge on COVID-19 in children

AUTHOR(S)
Florence T. Bourgeois; Paul Avillach; Mark A. Turner

Published: November 2020   Journal: Pediatric Research
The emergence of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) prompted a surge in research activity. Funding bodies swiftly allocated resources to establish research infrastructures and partnerships to study the novel virus. The scientific community realigned existing research and launched new studies to define the clinical course of COVID-19 and identify therapeutic candidates. Overall, comparatively fewer studies were initiated in children relative to adults, in part due to the lower prevalence and disease morbidity recorded in pediatric populations. However, characterizing the disease in pediatric patients is critical to elucidate transmission dynamics, inform public health measures, and generate evidence on best practices for clinical care and therapeutic interventions. The life-threatening multisystem inflammatory syndrome further underscores the need for natural history studies and drug development in pediatric populations.
Leveraging implementation science in the public health response to COVID-19: child food insecurity and federal nutrition assistance programs
Published: October 2020   Journal: Public Health Reports

This commentary aims to examine the crucial role of dissemination and implementation (D&I) science—the study of methods to promote adoption and integration of evidence-based research in real-world policy or practice—to improve public health post–COVID-19. D&I science was created for this very situation, in which scientific knowledge is greatly needed but only if it holds practical relevance for the policy, environmental, and organizational systems that advance health. The paper discusses the application of D&I science to rapid evaluations of federal child nutrition assistance programs deployed during the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 impact on research, lessons learned from COVID-19 research, implications for pediatric research

AUTHOR(S)
Debra L. Weiner; Vivek Balasubramaniam; Shetal I. Shah (et al.)

Published: June 2020   Journal: Pediatric Research
The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in unprecedented research worldwide. The impact on research in progress at the time of the pandemic, the importance and challenges of real-time pandemic research, and the importance of a pediatrician-scientist workforce are all highlighted by this epic pandemic. As we navigate through and beyond this pandemic, which will have a long-lasting impact on our world, including research and the biomedical research enterprise, it is important to recognize and address opportunities and strategies for, and challenges of research and strengthening the pediatrician-scientist workforce.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 148-150 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: COVID-19, medical research, research programmes
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.