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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1 - 15 of 43
Family coping strategies during Finland’s COVID-19 lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Milla Salin; Anniina Kaittila; Mia Hakovirta; Mia Hakovirta (et al.)

Published: November 2020
The COVID-19 pandemic and global lockdowns fundamentally changed families’ everyday lives. This study aims to examine how families with children coped during the COVID-19 lockdown in Finland and what kind of coping strategies they developed. An online survey including both qualitative and quantitative questions was conducted between April and May 2020 to gather Finnish families’ experiences during the COVID-19 lockdown. Huston’s social-ecological theory was used as an analytical framework. 
Stress, resilience, and well-being in Italian children and their parents during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Maria Cusinato; Sara Iannattone; Andrea Spoto (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak has forced parents and children to adopt significant changes in their daily routine, which has been a big challenge for families, with important implications for family stress. This study aims to analyze the potential risk and protective factors for parents’ and children’s well-being during a potentially traumatic event such as the COVID-19 quarantine. Specifically, it investigates parents’ and children’s well-being, parental stress, and children’s resilience. The study involved 463 Italian parents of children aged 5–17.
Intersecting vulnerabilities: the impacts of COVID-19 on the psycho-emotional lives of young people in low- and middle-income countries

AUTHOR(S)
Prerna Banati; Nicola Jones; Sally Youssef

Published: November 2020   Journal: The European Journal of Development Research
Across diverse contexts, emerging evidence suggests that the COVID-19 pandemic is increasing levels of anxiety and stress. In calling for greater attention to people’s psychosocial and emotional well-being, global actors have paid insufcient attention to the realities of the pandemic in low- and middle-income countries, where millions of people are already exposed to intersecting vulnerabilities. Chronic poverty, protracted violence, confict and displacement, coupled with weak health, education and protection systems, provide the backdrop of many adolescents’ lives. Drawing on qualitative in-country telephone interviews with over 500 adolescents in Ethiopia, Côte d’Ivoire and Lebanon, this article unpacks the age and gendered dimensions of COVID-19 and its response.
COVID on three continents: how local children’s organizations in Africa, Europe and South America are adapting to the coronavirus challenge

AUTHOR(S)
Suzanne Clulow; Nikoleta Dimitrouka; Iván Zamora Zapata

Published: November 2020   Journal: Journal of Children's Services

The purpose of this paper is to share anecdotally how the pandemic is affecting children, families and some of the frontline local services that support them across three continents.Three members of family for every child across three continents detail some of the day-to-day challenges they are facing in their work with children and families as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

Working with communities to mitigate the collateral impact of COVID-19 on children and young people

AUTHOR(S)
Charles Coughlan; Arpana Soni; Hanan Ghouneim

Published: November 2020   Journal: BMJ Paediatrics Open
The complex consequences of the pandemic cannot be addressed sustainably without community engagement, which takes on renewed importance in our era of ‘fake news’ and scepticism towards authority figures. This case study suggests that citizens value direct involvement in codesigning policy resources as it provides them with a sense of control during a crisis. Young people can participate directly in research as peer researchers, giving them new skills and simultaneously enhancing access to seldom-heard groups. This citizen-led approach to health and care in confirm the value of participatory research and community engagement in driving sustainable, patient-centred change.
Barriers to distance learning during the COVID-19 outbreak: A qualitative review from parents’ perspective

AUTHOR(S)
Sawsan Abuhammad

Published: November 2020   Journal: Heliyon

The goal of this study was to review the content posted in available local Jordanian Facebook groups to explore the perceptions of parents regarding the challenges of distance learning faced by their children during the coronavirus outbreak in Jordan. The Facebook search engine was used to identify local Facebook groups. The search keywords included distance learning, parents, and Jordan. Several faculty professors reviewed the posts and discussion flow on distance learning posted in Facebook groups from March 15th to April 25th 2020.

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 6 | Issue: 11 | No. of pages: 5 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: child education, COVID-19 response, e-learning, remote learning, social media, social distance | Countries: Jordan
COVID-19 pandemic impact on children and adolescents' mental health: biological, environmental, and social factors
Published: November 2020
Since the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) was announced, we had an unprecedented change in the way we organize ourselves socially and in our daily routine. Children and adolescents were also greatly impacted by the abrupt withdrawal from school, social life and outdoor activities. Some of them also experienced domestic violence growing. The stress they are subjected to directly impacts their mental health on account of increased anxiety, changes in their diets and in school dynamics, fear or even failing to scale the problem. The aim of this study is to bring up a discussion under different aspects and to alert public health and government agents about the need for surveillance and care of these individuals. Hopefully, the damage to their mental health as a result of the side effect of this pandemic can be mitigated by adequate and timely intervention.
Does the pandemic help us make education more equitable?

AUTHOR(S)
Pasi Sahlberg

Published: October 2020   Journal: Educational Research for Policy and Practice
Everybody agrees that the COVID-19 pandemic is a big disruption in education. It questions many traditional rules and structures that have organised the work of schools in the past. But not everyone agrees that the pandemic will eventually change schools. This article tries to determine whether the pandemic will help us fix some of the preexisting inequalities that we were unable, and often unwilling, to improve. It also argues that as we think about how education should be reimagined, it is paramount to continue efforts to make education more inclusive, fairer and equitable for all. Two examples from two distinct education systems, Australia and Finland, are used to highlight how disrupted teaching caused by school closures has had different impacts on schools and teachers.
Testing the effects of COVID-19 confinement in Spanish children: the role of parents’ distress, emotional problems and specific parenting

AUTHOR(S)
Estrella Romero; Laura López-Romero; Beatriz Domínguez-Álvarez (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.
The present study aimed to examine the effects of the Spanish confinement derived from the COVID-19 crisis on children and their families, accounting for child’s age. A range of child negative (e.g., conduct problems) and positive outcomes (e.g., routine maintenance) were examined, along with a set of parent-related variables, including resilience, perceived distress, emotional problems, parenting distress and specific parenting practices (e.g., structured or avoidant parenting), which were modeled through path analysis to better understand child adjustment.
Risk and protective factors for prospective changes in adolescent mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Natasha R. Magson; Justin Y. A. Freeman; Ronald M. Rapee (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Youth and Adolescence
The restrictions put in place to contain the COVID-19 virus have led to widespread social isolation, impacting mental health worldwide. These restrictions may be particularly difficult for adolescents, who rely heavily on their peer connections for emotional support. However, there has been no longitudinal research examining the psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic among adolescents. This study addresses this gap by investigating the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on adolescents mental health, and moderators of change, as well as assessing the factors perceived as causing the most distress.
Age-structured model for COVID-19: Effectiveness of social distancing and contact reduction in Kenya

AUTHOR(S)
Mark Kimathi; Samuel Mwalili; Viona Ojiambo (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Infectious Disease Modelling
Coronavirus disease 2019 is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. Kenya reported its first case on March 13, 2020 and by March 16, 2020 she instituted physical distancing strategies to reduce transmission and flatten the epidemic curve. An age-structured compartmental model was developed to assess the impact of the strategies on COVID-19 severity and burden. Contacts between different ages are incorporated via contact matrices. Simulation results show that 45% reduction in contacts for 60-days period resulted to 11.5–13% reduction of infections severity and deaths, while for the 190-days period yielded 18.8–22.7% reduction. The peak of infections in the 60-days mitigation was higher and happened about 2 months after the relaxation of mitigation as compared to that of the 190-days mitigation, which happened a month after mitigations were relaxed. Low numbers of cases in children under 15 years was attributed to high number of asymptomatic cases. High numbers of cases are reported in the 15–29 years and 30–59 years age bands. Two mitigation periods, considered in the study, resulted to reductions in severe and critical cases, attack rates, hospital and ICU bed demands, as well as deaths, with the 190-days period giving higher reductions.
Impacts of the COVID‐19 pandemic on youth mental health among youth with physical health challenges

AUTHOR(S)
Lisa D. Hawke; Suneeta Monga; Daphne Korczak (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Early Intervention in Psychiatry
This paper aims to examine mental health in conjunction with physical health during the COVID‐19 pandemic among youth with physical health conditions compared to those without. A cross‐sectional survey of 622 youth aged 14 to 28 was conducted. Analyses were conducted to understand the changes in mental and physical health among youth in four groups: (a) participants with a friend or family member diagnosed with COVID‐19, (b) participants with symptoms associated with COVID‐19, (c) participants with atopic conditions (asthma and allergies), and (d) participants with other preexisting physical health conditions.
The dark side of the web: a risk for children and adolescents challenged by isolation during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Pietro Ferrara; Giulia Franceschini; Giovanni Corsello (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: The Journal of Pediatrics

Children and adolescents who experience a prolonged state of physical isolation during COVID-19 may look for alternative, attractive or unconventional forms of socialization, available in the web world. This may expose them to the risks of unsupervised cyberspace exploration beyond the open web, which may lead them to areas that are usually not available to visitors. They may pass the gates of the “open” and “deep web” sections and enter into the dangerous “dark web” zones, which predominantly host unethical and criminal activities. In those shadowy corners of the worldwide web, there exist dangers ranging from identity theft and drug trade to suicide chat-rooms and child pornography. This commentary, authored by EPA-UNEPSA members of the working group on social pediatrics, briefly discusses the features of the dark web and its implications for children and adolescents. The aim is to raise awareness of pediatricians and families on the growing risk of child exploitation through the web, at a time when vulnerable young people face home lockdowns with potential abusers intruding on their privacy.

The potential impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on child growth and development: a systematic review

AUTHOR(S)
Liubiana Arantes de Araújo; Cássio Frederico Veloso; Matheus de Campos Souza (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Jornal de Pediatria
This systematic review examines the impact of social restriction on mental and developmental health in parents and children/adolescents. Findings indicate that the tools used to mitigate the threat of a pandemic such as COVID-19 may very well threaten child growth and development. These tools — such as social restrictions, shutdowns, and school closures — contribute to stress in parents and children and can become risk factors that threaten child growth and development. Adverse childhood experiences increase the risk of developmental delays and health problems in adulthood, such as cognitive impairment, substance abuse, depression, and non-communicable diseases.
Information about the impact of epidemics on parents and children is relevant to policy makers to aid them in developing strategies to help families cope with epidemic/pandemic-driven adversity and ensure their children’s healthy development.
Impact of COVID-19 outbreak on mental health and perceived strain among caregivers tending children with special needs

AUTHOR(S)
Sapna Dhiman; Pradeep Kumar Sahu; William R. Reed (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Research in Developmental Disabilities

While COVID-19 outbreak has had adverse psychological effects in children with special needs, the mental state and burden on their caregivers during this pandemic has yet to be reported. The COVID-19 outbreak has had a significant impact on caregiver strain compared to perceived strain before the pandemic. Prevalence of depressive symptoms is high among caregivers of children with special needs. Negative perception of homecare therapy is associated with higher perceived strain and poor mental health. Not using tele-rehabilitation and perception of it being a poor medium for rehabilitation pose greater mental health risks.

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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.