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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1 - 15 of 221
Loneliness, social relationships, and mental health in adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Kate Cooper; Emily Hards; Bettina Moltrecht (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: Journal of Affective Disorders
Loneliness is a common experience in adolescence and is related to a range of mental health problems. Such feelings may have been increased by social distancing measures introduced during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study aimed to investigate the effect of loneliness, social contact, and parent relationships on adolescent mental health during lockdown in the UK. Young people aged 11–16 years (n = 894) completed measures of loneliness, social contact, parent-adolescent relationships, and mental health difficulties during the first 11 weeks of lockdown and one-month later (n = 443).
Covid-19 in New Zealand and the Pacific: implications for children and families

AUTHOR(S)
Claire Freeman; Christina Ergler; Robin Kearns (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Children's Geographies
The experience of Covid-19 in Aotearoa New Zealand in 2020 has been strongly shaped by a narrative emanating from a robust partnership between politicians and public health experts. This narrative treads a careful line between hard and soft responses. To elaborate, enacting policy such as closing borders and requiring ‘lockdown’ was swift and firm but was accompanied by an attempt to develop a disposition of care and empathy towards the public. While there has been hardship for some families, the soft messaging has, we argue, led to aspects of the response that have been decidedly child-friendly. At the regional scale, border closures have impacted heavily on Pacific Island families, separating families as parents have been unable to return to their home islands and through the loss of economic opportunities associated with seasonal work and in local - often tourism dominated economies. In a COVID-era the future looks uncertain for children both within New Zealand and in the wider Pacific realm.
Virtual kindergarten readiness programming for preschool-aged children: feasibility, social validity, and preliminary impacts

AUTHOR(S)
Rebecca Dore; Laura Justice; Abigail K. Mills (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Early Education and Development
The global COVID-19 pandemic prevented the implementation of in-person summer learning programs designed to improve school readiness for entering kindergartners. Thus, we conducted the current study examining the feasibility, social validity, and preliminary impacts of a virtual summer learning program. Ninety-one preschoolers and their caregivers participated in a 4-week program involving one weekly teacher-caregiver meeting, two weekly Watch Together home learning activities, two weekly Play Together home learning activities, one or two weekly Read Together home learning activities, and one or two weekly teacher-child video chat lessons. Recruitment and participation indicated high levels of interest.
Children’s changing behaviours and routines, challenges and opportunities for parents during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Iskender Gelir; Nurullah Duzen

Published: April 2021   Journal: International Journal of Primary, Elementary and Early Years Education
This study examines the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on parents and preschool children from parents’ perspectives. We used an open-ended online questionnaire to reach parents (81: 60 mothers and 21 fathers). The questionnaire includes questions about gender, age, occupation and educational level, and questions about the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. The ecological model is used as the theoretical construct to examine interactions between children and parents at home. Three main categories are identified: changing behaviours and routines, challenges and difficulties, and opportunities for parenting. The participants report that children’s 11 social and emotional behaviours change during the pandemic in general and the lockdown.
Physical activity, screen exposure and sleep among students during the pandemic of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Yang‑feng Guo; Min‑qi Liao; Wei‑li Cai (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Scientific Reports volume
This study aimed to determine the levels of health-related behaviours (physical activity, screen exposure and sleep status) among Chinese students from primary, secondary and high schools during the pandemic of COVID-19, as well as their changes compared with their status before the pandemic. A cross-sectional online survey of 10,933 students was conducted among 10 schools in Guangzhou, China, between 8th and 15th March, 2020. After getting the informed consent from student’s caregivers, an online questionnaire was designed and used to obtain time spending on health-related behaviours during the pandemic of COVID-19, as well as the changes compared with 3 months before the pandemic, which was completed by students themselves or their caregivers.
The impact of the COVID-19 life on the Tokyo metropolitan area households with primary school-aged children: a study based on spatial characteristics

AUTHOR(S)
Shun Tomikawa; Yukari Niwa; Hwajin Lim (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of Urban Management
This study aims to elucidate the effects that staying home due to COVID-19 has had on house holds with primary school-age children living in the central area. To determine the differences in states of mind between people in the central area and people in other areas, have been investigated the changes in their“daily lives”including matters related to school; playing outside; associating with other children;“communication”including communication with family and friends; and the“use of information technologies”that secure communication. Moreover, this study explored households that are satisfied even when they are unable to go out and clarified how children and their parents who live in the central area perceive the current situation. The study results indicate that the risks ofCOVID-19 in large cities have spatial characteristics and increase the burden on households raising children. Particularly in the central area, which has a high population density, the changes children experience are striking. Furthermore, due to the inadequate amount of open space, a strong awareness of the“new normal (avoiding the‘Three Cs’(closed spaces, crowded places, and close-contact settings)”is required.
Child maltreatment reports and Child Protection Service responses during COVID-19: Knowledge exchange among Australia, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Germany, Israel, and South Africa

AUTHOR(S)
Ilan Katz; Carmit Katz; Sabine Andresen (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect

COVID-19 has become a worldwide pandemic impacting child protection services (CPSs) in many countries. With quarantine and social distancing restrictions, school closures, and recreational venues suspended or providing reduced access, the social safety net for violence prevention has been disrupted significantly. Impacts include the concerns of underreporting and increased risk of child abuse and neglect, as well as challenges in operating CPSs and keeping their workforce safe. The current discussion paper explored the impact of COVID-19 on child maltreatment reports and CPS responses by comparing countries using available population data.

The men’s mental health perspective on adolescent suicide in the COVID-19 era
Published: April 2021   Journal: Acta Neuropsychiatrica

The COVID-19 pandemic has drastically changed society and introduced many new factors to consider in adolescent suicide risk assessment and prevention. One complexity that warrants consideration is the male-specific impacts of the pandemic within adolescence. A review of the relevant literature.

Safely social: promoting and sustaining adolescent engagement in social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Ming-Te Wang; Christina L. Scanlon; Meng Hua (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of Adolescent Health
Adolescents are at risk for violating COVID-19 social distancing measures owing to salient developmental needs for autonomy and relatedness. This intensive longitudinal study investigated the initiation and sustainment of adolescents' daily social distancing behaviors. Focus group and daily-diary approaches were used to collect 6,216 assessments from a nationwide American adolescent sample (n = 444; Mage = 15.1; 40% male; 42% black/African American, 40% white/European American, 10% Latinx, 6% Asian American, 2% Native American) over the course of 14 days at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.
School closures reduced social mixing of children during COVID-19 with implications for transmission risk and school reopening policies

AUTHOR(S)
Jennifer R. Head; Kristin L. Andrejko; Qu Cheng (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of the Royal Society Interface
School closures may reduce the size of social networks among children, potentially limiting infectious disease transmission. To estimate the impact of K–12 closures and reopening policies on children's social interactions and COVID-19 incidence in California's Bay Area, this study collected data on children's social contacts and assessed implications for transmission using an individual-based model.
Quality of life changes during the COVID-19 pandemic for caregivers of children with ADHD and/or ASD

AUTHOR(S)
Keith W. Pecor; Georgia Barbyannis; Max Yang (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research Public Health
The COVID-19 pandemic has presented many challenges to caregivers of children. Families with children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and/or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are an understudied but potentially vulnerable population to changes during the outbreak. As such, the aim of this study was to contrast quality of life for caregivers of children with ADHD and/or ASD, before and during the pandemic, compared to caregivers of neurotypical (NT) children.
‘I’m gonna tell you about how Mrs Rona has affected me’: exploring young people’s experiences of the COVID-19 pandemic in North East England: a qualitative diary-based study

AUTHOR(S)
Stephanie Scott; Victoria J. McGowan; Shelina Visram

Published: April 2021   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Children and young people risk being ‘disproportionately harmed’ by the COVID-19 pandemic. Whilst an evolving body of literature focuses on the impact of the pandemic on the mental health and wellbeing of children and young people, less attention has been paid to the collection of qualitative, exploratory data. The aim of this study was to examine young people in North East England’s experiences of COVID-19 and associated control measures. Flexible, qualitative diaries were collected with 31 young people aged 13–17 for six weeks between July and October 2020.
Characteristics and risk factors for SARS-CoV-2 in children tested in the early phase of the pandemic: a cross-sectional study, Italy, 23 February to 24 May 2020

AUTHOR(S)
Marzia Lazzerini; Idanna Sforzi; Sandra Trapani (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Eurosurveillance

The pandemic of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) affected Italy as first country in Europe. The Italian government declared a state of emergency on 31 January 2020 and by 24 May 2020, a total of 229,858 cases of COVID-19 had been diagnosed across the country. From the very beginning of the pandemic, data suggested that children are less affected than adults by COVID-19. However, timely diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection is not only important for the single individual, it is crucial to prevent the spread of the pandemic. A better understanding of the predictors of a positive SARS-CoV-2 test results may facilitate timely case finding and contact tracing and thus contribute to control the pandemic. It may also improve organisation of care in settings where diagnostic facilities are available but still require a considerable processing time, where diagnostic facilities are lacking and where diagnosis, in the absence of other tools, may need to be based on clinical characteristics alone.

Cite this research | Vol.: 26 | Issue: 14 | No. of pages: 12 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: COVID-19 response, disease transmission, infectious disease, lockdown, school attendance, social distance | Countries: Italy
The COVID-19 outbreak increases maternal stress during pregnancy, but not the risk for postpartum depression

AUTHOR(S)
Myrthe G. B. M. Boekhorst; Lotte Muskens; Lianne P. Hulsbosch (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Archives of Women's Mental Health
The COVID-19 pandemic affects society and may especially have an impact on mental health of vulnerable groups, such as perinatal women. This prospective cohort study of 669 participating women in the Netherlands compared perinatal symptoms of depression and stress during and before the pandemic. After a pilot in 2018, recruitment started on 7 January 2019. Up until 1 March 2020 (before the pandemic), 401 women completed questionnaires during pregnancy, of whom 250 also completed postpartum assessment. During the pandemic, 268 women filled out at least one questionnaire during pregnancy and 59 postpartum (1 March–14 May 2020). Pregnancy-specific stress increased significantly in women during the pandemic.
Next generation Europe: a recovery plan for children, adolescents and their families

AUTHOR(S)
Jörg M. Fegert; Laura A. Kehoe; Fusun Çuhadaroglu Çetin (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
The youth of today—our most precious resource—are finally getting the attention they deserve. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, including the toll exerted on their mental health had been overlooked during the early months of the pandemic. In the first lockdown, the needs of children and adolescents and their families were largely ignored apart from the child and adolescent psychiatrists all over Europe who worked tirelessly on their behalf. The lives of our young people were severely restricted and for many, this complex situation was incomprehensible. The protection of these children’s rights and their welfare have finally come sharply into focus.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.