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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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16 - 30 of 97
COVID-19 emergency: social distancing and social exclusion as risks for suicide ideation and attempts in adolescents

AUTHOR(S)
Claudio Longobardi; Rosalba Morese; Matteo Angelo Fabris

Published: November 2020   Journal: Frontiers in Psychology

On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared a pandemic, and Italy was among the nations most affected, with more than 29,000 victims. Measures to counter the progression of the epidemic have forced a review and reformulation of the day-to-day activities of the affected populations, necessitating restrictive measures such as social distancing and quarantine. Several studies have hypothesized that quarantine could have a negative psychological impact on the population. Studies have shown that quarantine leads to a decrease in positive emotions and an increase in negative emotions, such as anger and fear. The experience of quarantine tends to correlate with decreased psychological well-being and the onset of psychological symptoms and emotional disorders, such as depression, anxiety, insomnia, and post-traumatic symptoms. Factors such as the quarantine duration, the uncertainty of information, and the fear of being infected or of the infection of loved ones appear to be factors that increase distress. In addition, the loss of routine and confinement, which causes a drastic reduction in physical and social contact with others, can increase the sense of isolation and loneliness, resulting in psychological distress. The literature has focused mainly on the psychological well-being of adults and health professionals, and not on adolescent well-being, and, in particular, the risk of suicidal ideation. Suicide is estimated to be the world's second leading cause of death among adolescents, and suicidal ideation, which contributes to the risk of committing suicide, is at its peak in adolescence.

Potential impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on communication and language skills in children

AUTHOR(S)
Sara A. Charney; Stephen M. Camarata; Alexander Chern

Published: November 2020   Journal: Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery
The COVID-19 pandemic has led to many unintended, long-lasting consequences for society. Preventative practices such as mask wearing, social distancing, and virtual meetings and classrooms to address contagion concerns may negatively affect communication, particularly in the pediatric population, as schools have begun to open this fall. Increasing awareness and creating innovative methods to promote communication and language learning in settings both in person and virtual is paramount. Although more studies are needed to characterize the pandemic’s impact on pediatric speech and language development, clinicians and parents should be cognizant of this phenomenon and proactive in facilitating an optimal communication environment for children.
Children experienced new or worsening tic issues when they were separated from their parents during the Italian COVID‐19 lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Danilo Buonsenso; Cristina De Rose; Paolo Mariotti

Published: November 2020   Journal: Acya Paediatrica
A systematic review and meta‐analysis covering the period up to 28 July 2020 suggested that the general impact of COVID‐19 on the physical health of children had been relatively mild up to that point.In fact, studies have suggested that children and adolescents have lower susceptibility to the virus than adults and play a lesser role in transmission, in marked contrast to influenza.However, they have indirectly suffered from the restrictions established to limit the spread of pandemic. These include the mental and social health consequences of social distancing measures, such as closing schools and stopping recreational activities, which are important for the cultural, social and psychological growth of children and adolescents. Some studies have reported that the impact of lockdown measures has caused more harm to them than the actual virus.
The impact of the COVID‐19 pandemic on the mental health and well‐being of children and young people

AUTHOR(S)
Helen Cowie; Carrie‐Anne Myers

Published: November 2020   Journal: Children & Society
The COVID‐19 pandemic has had an enormous impact across the world. This discussion paper examines the effect that lockdown has had on the mental health and well‐being of children and young people. It is written from a UK perspective in the light of the international evidence. Many of the discussion points raised resonate globally. The article discusses how these issues can be dealt with and sets out potential solutions as the world emerges from this global crisis.
COVID-19 social isolation in Brazil: effects on the physical activity routine of families with children

AUTHOR(S)
Cristina dos Santos Cardoso De Sá; André Pombo; Carlos Luz (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Revista paulista de pediatria
This study aims to identify how Brazilian families with children aged under 13 years face the period of social isolation resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, especially regarding the time spent on physical activity (PA), intellectual activity, games, outdoor activities and screen. An anonymous online survey was launched on March 24, 2020 in Brazil to assess how families with children aged up to 12 years are adjusting their daily routines to this situation. In the survey, each family reported the daily time each child spent in sedentary activity (sum of intellectual activities, play time on screen, playing without PA) and PA (sum of playing with PA and PA).
Increased psychological distress during COVID-19 and quarantine in Ireland: a national survey

AUTHOR(S)
Tom Burke; Anna Berry; Laura K. Taylor

Published: November 2020   Journal: Journal of Clinical Medicine
The emergence of the coronavirus pneumonia (COVID-19) resulted in a global pandemic. The psychological impact of an epidemic is multifaceted and acute, with long-term consequences. Methods: A cross-sectional online survey-based design was employed, assessing the psychological impact of COVID-19 on members of the Irish public during the quarantine period of COVID-19 in Ireland. Participants were invited to complete the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21) retrospectively (prior to quarantine) and during the quarantine period, as well as measures of illness perceptions, well-being, and a bespoke measure (the Effects of COVID Questionnaire, ECQ), which assessed perceptions of COVID-related stresses associated with personal concerns, caring for children, caring for aging parents, as well as gratitude.
Immediate psychological effects of the COVID-19 quarantine in youth from Italy and Spain

AUTHOR(S)
Mireia Orgilés; Alexandra Morales; Elisa Delvecchio (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Frontiers in Psychology
The COVID-19 quarantine has affected more than 860 million children and adolescents worldwide, but to date, no study has been developed within Western countries to examine the psychological impact on their lives. The present study aims to examine for the first time the emotional impact of the quarantine on children and adolescents from Italy and Spain, two of the countries most affected by COVID-19.
Relationship between children physical activity, inflammatory mediators and lymphocyte activation: possible impact of social isolation (COVID-19)

AUTHOR(S)
Murilo Merlin; Heloisa Helena de Oliveira; Maria Elizabeth Pereira Passos (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Sport Sciences for Health
Lifestyle and body composition may be simultaneously responsible for immune response modulation. This study aimed to compare plasmatic adipokines concentration and lymphocyte cytokine production in children with diferent daily steps (DS) range, as well as to discuss the potential negative impact of the social isolation during COVID-19 pandemic in this context. DS can be a useful and low-cost way of monitoring children’s health status.
Anxiety, depression and PTSD among children and their parent during 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in China

AUTHOR(S)
Jinming Yue; Xueyan Zang; Yunying Le (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Current Psychology
Home quarantine may lead to families developing a variety of psychological distress. The purpose of this study was to examine the psychological status of children and their parent during 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in China. Data were collected from children (n = 1360) and their parent (n = 1360) in China using online survey during February 2020. Demographic information, media exposure, and psychological status including anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms were assessed using self-report measures.
COVID-19: digital and remote approaches in eliminating female genital mutilation and child marriage
Institution: *UNICEF
Published: November 2020
This brief is designed to support country programmes to conduct quality, evidence-based, meaningful and measurable engagement for prevention of harmful practices programming, even when interpersonal communication is not possible. In particular, this note will provide insights to the use of digital communications resources, since physical distancing requirements during the COVID-19 pandemic have further strengthened reliance on mass media, social media and mobile technology as a way of reaching and engaging with intended audiences.
A rapid review of the impact of quarantine and restricted environments on children’s play and the role of play in children’s health

AUTHOR(S)
Kelsey M. Graber; Elizabeth M. Byrne; Emily J. Goodacre (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Child: Care, Health and Development

Amidst the COVID‐19 pandemic, there is uncertainty regarding potential lasting impacts on children’s health and educational outcomes. Play, a fundamental part of childhood, may be integral to children’s health during crises. This paper undertook a rapid review of the impact of quarantine, isolation, and other restrictive environments on play and whether play mitigates adverse effects of such restrictions.

Exploring the impact of COVID-19 on mental health outcomes in children and adolescents: a systematic review

AUTHOR(S)
Finiki Nearchou; Clodagh Flinn; Rachel Niland (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: International Journal of Environmrntal Research and Public Health
The psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has been widely discussed during the past few months, with scholars expressing concern about its potential debilitating consequences on youth mental health. Hence, this research aimed to provide a systematic review of the evidence on the COVID-19 pandemic’s impact on youth mental health. A mixed methods integrated review was conducted to identify any empirical study that focused on young people ≤ 18 years old.  Eight databases were systematically searched to identify studies of any type of research design. 
COVID-19 and adolescent mental health in India

AUTHOR(S)
Suravi Patra; Binod Kumar Patro

Published: November 2020   Journal: The Lancet Psychiatry

COVID-19 might not be as lethal in children and adolescents as it is in adults, but it does cause a lot of psychological distress in this age group. Adolescents are experiencing acute and chronic stress because of parental anxiety, disruption of daily routines, increased family violence, and home confinement with little or no access to peers, teachers, or physical activity.

 

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Physical distancing caused by COVID-19: psychological effects on Cuban children and adolescents
Institution: UNICEF Cuba Country Office
Published: November 2020 UNICEF Publication
Physical distancing caused by COVID-19 has had a significant impact on daily life throughout the world. In this sense, Cuba is no exception. Children are a vulnerable population due to the characteristics of their subjective development. The United Nations International Children’s Fund (UNICEF, 2020a) has warned that children and families across the globe will suffer the consequences of the economic destruction caused by the pandemic.
Intersecting vulnerabilities: the impacts of COVID-19 on the psycho-emotional lives of young people in low- and middle-income countries

AUTHOR(S)
Prerna Banati; Nicola Jones; Sally Youssef

Published: November 2020   Journal: The European Journal of Development Research
Across diverse contexts, emerging evidence suggests that the COVID-19 pandemic is increasing levels of anxiety and stress. In calling for greater attention to people’s psychosocial and emotional well-being, global actors have paid insufcient attention to the realities of the pandemic in low- and middle-income countries, where millions of people are already exposed to intersecting vulnerabilities. Chronic poverty, protracted violence, confict and displacement, coupled with weak health, education and protection systems, provide the backdrop of many adolescents’ lives. Drawing on qualitative in-country telephone interviews with over 500 adolescents in Ethiopia, Côte d’Ivoire and Lebanon, this article unpacks the age and gendered dimensions of COVID-19 and its response.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.