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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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46 - 60 of 213
Changes in diet, activity, weight, and wellbeing of parents during COVID-19 lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Rachel G. Curtis; Timothy Olds; Ty Ferguson (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Plos One
The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically impacted lifestyle behaviour as public health initiatives aim to “flatten the curve”. This study examined changes in activity patterns (physical activity, sedentary time, sleep), recreational physical activities, diet, weight and wellbeing from before to during COVID-19 restrictions in Adelaide, Australia. This study used data from a prospective cohort of Australian adults (parents of primary school-aged children; n = 61, 66% female, aged 41±6 years).
Loneliness and problematic mobile phone use among adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic: the roles of escape motivation and self-control

AUTHOR(S)
Jiayu Li; Danni Zhan; Yuhong Zhou (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Addictive Behaviors
This cross-sectional study explored the relationship between loneliness and problematic mobile phone use among Chinese adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic, considering the effects of escape motivation and self-control. 1034 adolescents (mean age 15.76 ± 1.20 years) from China have been recruited. The results showed that loneliness was positively associated with escape motivation and adolescent problematic mobile phone use.
Socioeconomic inequality in child mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic: first evidence from China

AUTHOR(S)
Wen Li; Zijing Wang; Guanghai Wang (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Journal of Affective Disorders
There are increasing concerns that the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic will disproportionately affect socioeconomically disadvantaged children. However, there lacks empirical evidence on socio-economic inequalities in child mental health and associated factors.
Digital health literacy intervention to support maternal, child and family health in primary healthcare settings of Pakistan during the age of coronavirus: study protocol for a randomised controlled trialhttps://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/11/3/e045163

AUTHOR(S)
Sara Rizvi Jafree; Nadia Bukhari; Anam Muzamill (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: BMJ Open
There is a need to continue primary healthcare services through digital communication for disadvantaged women living in underdeveloped areas of Pakistan, especially in the age of the coronavirus pandemic, social distancing and lockdown of communities. This project will be the first of its kind in aiming to implement a digital health literacy intervention, using smartphone and internet, to disadvantaged women through female community healthcare workers. Improved health literacy in women of reproductive years is known to promote maternal, child and family health overall. Methods and analysis The study will include a baseline survey, a pre- and post-test survey and a 3-month lasting intervention on (1) hygiene and prevention and (2) coronavirus awareness and prevention.
Adolescent emotional disorder symptoms and transdiagnostic vulnerabilities as predictors of young adult substance use during the COVID-19 pandemic: mediation by substance-related coping behaviors

AUTHOR(S)
Junhan Cho; Mariel S. Bello; Nina C. Christie (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy
The COVID-19 pandemic presents unique stressors (e.g. social isolation) that may increase substance use risk among young adults with a history of emotional disturbance. This study examined whether emotional disorder symptoms and transdiagnostic vulnerabilities during adolescence predicted young adult substance use during COVID-19, and whether using substances to cope with the pandemic’s social conditions mediated these associations.
Harm reduction for adolescents and young adults during the COVID-19 pandemic: a case study of community care in reach

AUTHOR(S)
Elizabeth Noyes; Ellis Yeo; Megan Yerton (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Public Health Reports
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has challenged the ability of harm reduction programs to provide vital services to adolescents, young adults, and people who use drugs, thereby increasing the risk of overdose, infection, withdrawal, and other complications of drug use. To evaluate the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on harm reduction services for adolescents and young adults in Boston, this study conducted a quantitative assessment of the Community Care in Reach (CCIR) youth pilot program to determine gaps in services created by its closure during the peak of the pandemic (March 19–June 21, 2020).
The COVID‐19 pandemic and families in Japan

AUTHOR(S)
Tazuko Shibusawa; Chikako Ishii; Shinichi Nakamura (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Australian and New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy
This paper, which is authored by members of the Japanese Association of Family Therapy (JAFT), describes the COVID‐19 pandemic in Japan from a family systems perspective. It describes the course of the pandemic and the ways in which government policies to mitigate the pandemic have affected Japanese families. Challenges that affect Japanese families include the inability to participate in family and social rituals, prescribed gender roles that specifically affect women, high suicide rates, and prejudice against those who are at risk of spreading the infection. The need to shelter in place has also forced family homes to function as a workplace for parents, classrooms for children, and day care services for frail elders, which has resulted in psychological distress among individuals and conflicts among families.
Depression, anxiety and associated factors among Chinese adolescents during the COVID-19 outbreak: a comparison of two cross-sectional studies

AUTHOR(S)
Xu Chen; Han Qi; Rui Liu (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Translational Psychiatry
The 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is a public health emergency of international concern. In China, all schools were shut down and students were home quarantined to prevent disease spread; these steps could have potential negative effects on mental health of adolescents. This study aimed to examine changes in depression and anxiety among Chinese adolescents during the COVID-19 epidemic, and explore factors associated with depression and anxiety.
Unintended consequences of restrictive visitation policies during the COVID-19 pandemic: implications for hospitalized children

AUTHOR(S)
Jean L. Raphael; Woodie Kessel; Mona Patel

Published: March 2021   Journal: Pediatric research
The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in devastating consequences worldwide with over 2,000,000 deaths. Although COVID-19 demonstrates less morbidity and mortality among children,1 it has dramatically altered the health-care experience for children and families. This is particularly true for those cared for in inpatient settings. The competing priorities of safeguarding families and health-care personne from a serious infection, stewardship of limited resources, ensuring family-centered care (FCC), and carrying out end-of-life care have led to tensions in how to effectively implement and execute necessary restrictive visitation policies. While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provides broad guidelines to health-care facilities on the management of visitors, hospitals must determine how to implement such guidelines.
Pandemic-related emergency psychiatric presentations for self-harm of children and adolescents in 10 countries (PREP-kids): a retrospective international cohort study

AUTHOR(S)
Dennis Ougrin; Ben Hoi‑ching Wong; Mehrak Vaezinejad (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
This study aims to examine the differences in hospital emergency psychiatric presentations for self-harm of children and adolescents during the covid-19 lockdown in March and April 2020 compared with the same period in 2019. Retrospective cohort study. Electronic patient records from 23 hospital emergency departments in ten countries grouped into 14 areas have been used.
COVID-19 quarantine: psychological impact and support for children and parents

AUTHOR(S)
Francesco Demaria; Stefano Vicari

Published: March 2021   Journal: Italian Journal of Pediatrics
In response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, national governments have imposed urgent sanitary and social measures to control the spread of the virus. One such measure is quarantine, which involves restricting people’s movement through the isolation of infected or suspected infected individuals in order to reduce the risk of new infections. Research has shown that quarantine is a psychologically stressful experience. With respect to children, lack of school and interruptions to daily routines could have a negative impact on their physical and mental health. Parents may also pass their psychological distress to children and practice inappropriate parenting behaviors, which could contribute to the development of post-traumatic stress symptoms in children.In order to prevent these negative outcomes, governments must carefully consider any their decision to impose quarantine and family social care services must work together with children’s mental health services to ensure that the experience is as tolerable and safe as possible.
Risk and protective factors related to children’s symptoms of emotional difficulties and hyperactivity/inattention during the COVID-19-related lockdown in France: results from a community sample

AUTHOR(S)
Flore Moulin; Tarik El‑Aarbaoui; Joel José Herranz Bustamante (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
The COVID-19 epidemic has spread worldwide since December 2019. To contain it, preventive measures including social distancing, economic shutdown, and school closures were introduced, carrying the risk of mental health burden in adults and children. Although the knowledge base regarding children's response to trauma and adverse events in general has broadened, descriptions of their mental health during epidemics remain scarce. In particular, the role of family socioeconomic characteristics and parental mental health are poorly understood.
Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on youth sport in Australia and consequences for future participation and retention

AUTHOR(S)
Sam Elliott; M. J. Drummond; I. Prichard (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: BMC Public Health.
COVID-19 continues to represent the single biggest challenge to contemporary community sport globally. Compliance with social distancing policies, strict return-to-play protocols, and COVID-19 specific training has, perhaps, forever changed the way that children and young people engage in organised sport. Within this context, and while many children and families seek to re-engage with community sport, researchers and sport practitioners have an obligation to ask questions about how the pandemic has impacted youth sport, understand the short- and long-term consequences, and explore what (if any) opportunities can be seized to assist and improve future participation and retention. The aim of this paper was to present an in-depth exploration of the impact of COVID-19 on youth sport in South Australia.
Keeping children healthy during and after COVID-19 pandemic: meeting youth physical activity needs

AUTHOR(S)
Andjelka Pavlovic; Laura F. DeFina; Breanna L. Natale (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: BMC Public Health
The purpose of this study was to: 1) examine the maintenance of Physical Education and physical activity during the distance learning time, 2) determine the resources educators are utilizing to deliver PE curricula, and 3) understand the challenges experienced by educators during distance learning.
School reopening without robust COVID-19 mitigation risks accelerating the pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Deepti Gurdasani; Nisreen A. Alwan; Trisha Greenhalgh (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: The Lancet
On Feb 22, 2021, the UK Government announced that schools in England would fully reopen on March 8, 2021. While returning to school as soon as possible is imperative for the education, social development, and mental and physical welfare of children, not enough has been done to make schools safer for students and staff. Without additional mitigations, increases in transmission are likely, this time with more infectious and possibly more virulent variants, resulting in further lockdowns, school closures, and absenteeism. Even when schools were supposed to be fully open, at points of high community transmission, 22% of secondary school children were not attending due to self-isolation. In some areas, attendance was as low as 61%.
46 - 60 of 213

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.