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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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School off, learning on: identification of preference and challenges among school students towards distance learning during COVID19 outbreak

AUTHOR(S)
Subreen al Salman; Mohammed Alkathiri; Ali Khaled Bawaneh

Published: February 2021   Journal: International Journal of Lifelong Education
Since continuing learning draws on education, wherever it is available, no matter by whom provided, it is clear that programmes offered by formal education institutions are only one of many sources and options. The current study aimed at identification students’ preferable levels and challenges of using distance learning in COVID-19. The sample comprised of 720 students. The researchers adopted a questionnaire and verified its validity and reliability.
“What if…it never ends?”: examining challenges in primary teachers' experience during the wholly online teaching

AUTHOR(S)
Zhuo Wang; Jia Zhou; Yubin Ma (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: The Journal of Educational Research
Since the outbreak of Covid-19, the Chinese government has issued strict policies for school operations. To meet the demands of normal school schedule while at home, teachers have been required to provide fully online classes regardless of their previous experience. Understanding and describing the authentic challenges teachers face during the wholly online learning and teaching period may not only allow stakeholders to make more informed decisions about subsequent practices, but also provide timely lessons for primary schools in other regions combating similar challenges. The present study was a phenomenological study, in which 26 Chinese primary school teachers were interviewed and provided photos that represented their typical online teaching experience.
‘Homeschooling’ and the COVID-19 crisis: the insights of parents on curriculum and remote learning

AUTHOR(S)
Daniela Fontenelle-Tereshchuk

Published: February 2021   Journal: Interchange
The COVID-19 crisis forced schools to temporarily close from March 2020 to June 2020, producing unpredictable changes in instructional contexts and patterns. A new concept of ‘homeschooling’ emerged which required parents to support the implementation of the curriculum through remote learning. This article is based on a case study focusing on the perceptions of experiences of ten parents of Elementary school children during the school lockdown in Alberta, Canada. Parents argue that the schools’ demands on them were unreasonable. These added to the stress of the quarantine and professional losses, and to the burden of working full-time, fulflling household responsibilities, and having children rely mostly on parents to deliver an often brief, ‘shallow’ weekly lesson plan that lacked clear expectations and reliable assessment pieces. Parents also strongly cast doubts on the popular reliability of online education by suggesting the unsuitability of online tools to promote independent learning among young children. The study may provide valuable contributions to further inform how to better support learning from home during this ongoing pandemic.
The changes we need: education post COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Yong Zhao; Jim Watterston

Published: February 2021   Journal: Journal of Educational Change
The COVID-19 pandemic has caused both unprecendented disruptions and massive changes to education. However, as schools return, these changes may disappear. Moreover, not all of the changes are necessarily the changes needed in education. This paper argues that the pandemic has created a unique opportunity for educational changes that have been proposed before COVID-19 but were never fully realized. It identifies three big changes that education should make post COVID: curriculum that is developmental, personalized, and evolving; pedagogy that is student-centered, inquiry-based, authentic, and purposeful; and delivery of instruction that capitalizes on the strengths of both synchronous and asynchronous learning.
Adoption of e-learning during lockdown in India

AUTHOR(S)
Sandeep Kumar Mathivanan; Prabhu Jayagopal; Shakeel Ahmed (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: International Journal of System Assurance Engineering and Management
Education institutions like schools, colleges, and universities in India are currently based on traditional learning methods and follow the conventional setting of face-to-face interaction/lectures in a classroom. Most of the academic sector started unified learning, still most of them struct with old steps. The unexpected Plague of a deadly infection called COVID-19 caused by (SARS-Cov-2) trembled the whole world. The WHO announced it as a disease outbreak. This circumstance challenged the whole education system worldwide and compelled educators to change to an online mode immediately. Many educational organizations that were earlier unwilling to change their traditional didactic practice had no choice but to move exclusively to online teaching–learning. This article provides an elaborate discussion about the education sector's impact during a disease outbreak in India. It offers a detailed discussion regarding how India adopts the e-learning approach in this critical situation. Further, it describes how to cope with the challenges related to e-learning.
Multilevel analysis of the educational use of technology: quantity and versatility of digital technology usage in Finnish basic education schools

AUTHOR(S)
Meri‐Tuulia Kaarakainen; Loretta Saikkonen

Published: February 2021   Journal: Journal of Computer Assisted Learning
The adoption of technology in teaching has been identified to relate to various factors from attitudes and self‐efficacy to subjective norms and digital references. The aim of this study is to broaden the perspective to hierarchical grouping effects. Multilevel modelling of the study utilizes the data of 2355 Finnish basic education teachers. The results show that, before the coronavirus pandemic, Finnish teachers used digital devices in teaching at least once a week, on average, and many times on a daily basis, varying according to the subject being taught. The variation in teachers' technology usage occurs mainly at the individual level, with a small proportion between schools; higher‐level hierarchies proved redundant in the context of Finland. At the teacher level, digital skills, age, and digital self‐efficacy increase technology usage in teaching. At the end, the significance and limitations of the research and the direction of future research in the post‐pandemic era are discussed.
How the COVID-19 pandemic is reshaping the education service

AUTHOR(S)
Byeongwoo Kang

Published: February 2021
This chapter focuses on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the education service, which is typically classified as a service industry in industrial classifications. Digital transformation in the education sector has attracted significant attention recently. The distance education is becoming a new normal in the education service. However, the education community in general is not ready to maximize the merits of distance learning. We need to change the role of instructors from a knowledge teacher to a learning motivator and progress manager. In addition, we need more investment in ICT infrastructure in the education service to enhance educational effects.
Facilitating emergency remote K-12 teaching in computing-enhanced virtual learning environments during COVID-19 pandemic - blessing or curse?

AUTHOR(S)
Tamar Shamir-Inbal; Ina Blau

Published: February 2021   Journal: Journal of Educational Computing Research
This study explored teacher experience in leading Emergency Remote Teaching (ERT) in K-12 and conducting blended synchronous and asynchronous instruction during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study’s purpose was to understand the pedagogical, technological, and organizational challenges and benefits of computing-enhanced digital learning environments, and to explore teachers' pedagogical strategies. This study employed a qualitative research paradigm using nation-wide, online samples, which included 133 elementary and secondary school teachers from Hebrew-speaking and Arabic-speaking schools in Israel.
The impact of COVID-19 and homeschooling on students' engagement with physical activity

AUTHOR(S)
Astrid Roe; Marte Blikstad-Balas; Cecilie Pedersen Dalland

Published: January 2021   Journal: Frontiers in Sports and Active Living
The COVID-19 pandemic forced an unprecedented global shutdown that closed schools for months. In many nations, schools were closed to students, and teachers directed educational activities remotely via digital devices or homeschooling resources. This article explores how these months of homeschooling have affected the physical activity of Norwegian students in Grades 1–10. All Norwegian students are supposed to have at least 60 min of physical activity every day in school. We draw on data from two surveys, one with parents (N = 4,624) and the other with teachers (N = 726), to provide an indication of the daily physical activity students engaged in during the period of homeschooling.
Remote teaching during COVID-19: Implications from a national survey of language educators

AUTHOR(S)
Kelly M. Moser; Tianlan Wei; Devon Brenner

Published: January 2021   Journal: System

To mitigate transmission of COVID-19, rapid changes in instructional delivery moved from in-person to remote instruction. Although literature from before the crisis suggests that online language learners fare at least as well as their face-to-face counterparts, the abrupt shift from face-to-face contexts to remote learning is fundamentally different from planned on line learning. Understanding the nature of this shift can inform future online and remote teaching. This national survey study was guided by research questions that explore any substantive change in the practices and perceptions of PreK-12 and post-secondary language teachers' instruction during COVID-19. It explores any change as related to class-room setting (PreK-12 vs post-secondary) and prior experience with distance education.

Profiling teachers' readiness for online teaching and learning in higher education: who's ready?

AUTHOR(S)
Ronny Scherer; Sarah K. Howard; Jo Tondeur (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Computers in Human Behavior
The COVID-19 pandemic has forced a shift to online teaching and learning (OTL) in colleges and universities across the globe, requiring teachers to adapt their teaching in a very short time—independent of whether they were prepared. Drawing from an international sample of N =739 higher education teachers in 58 countries, the present study sheds light on teachers’ readiness for OTL at the time of the pandemic by (a) identifying teacher profiles based on a set of key dimensions of readiness; (b) explaining profile membership by individual teacher characteristics, contextual aspects of the shift to OTL, and country-level indicators representing educational innovation and cultural orientation. We conducted latent profile analysis and identified three teacher profiles with consistently high or low readiness or an inconsistent readiness profile—hence, teachers in higher education are not a homogeneous group
Factors associated with caregiver preferences for children's return to school during the COVID‐19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Christine A. Limbers

Published: November 2020   Journal: Journal of School Health

Amid the COVID‐19 pandemic, there is a need to understand caregiver preferences for their children's instructional format for the start of the 2020 to 2021 academic year. The purpose of the current study was to assess caregiver preferences for on‐campus versus virtual learning at home during the fall and factors associated with these preferences. Participants were caregivers of 4436 children and adolescents who were enrolled in pre‐kindergarten through high school at a large, public school district in Texas. Caregivers were asked to complete an anonymous, online survey about their initial preferences for their student's back to the school learning environment.

Learning at home during COVID-19: effects on vulnerable young Australians

AUTHOR(S)
Natalie Brown; Kitty Te Riele; Becky Shelley (et al.)

Institution: University of Tasmania, Peter Underwood Centre
Published: April 2020
Nearly half the national school student population is at risk of having their learning and wellbeingsignificantly compromised by not being at school because they are in a vulnerable group, due to their young age; social disadvantage; specific needs; or family employment context. As soon as health restrictions permit there is an urgent need to reconnect these students to the physical context of school-based learning to support their learning and wellbeing outcomes. Concurrently there is a need to invest rapidly in developing significant capability in schools to deliver education both online and on-site
Delivering distance learning in emergencies: a review of evidence and best practice

AUTHOR(S)
Emily Morris; Anna Farrell; Abagail Todd

Published: April 2020
The purpose of this review is to provide evidence on four effective distance learning modalities that can be implemented in USAID-recipient countries during and beyond emergencies. These four distance learning modalities—radio/audio, video/television, mobile phone programming, and online learning—are examined alongside the technologies used to access distance learning (radios, mobile phones, televisions, tablets, and, to a lesser extent, computers). While these modalities can be implemented in conflict settings and during crises, such as the COVID-19 pandemic when learning institutions are closed, their utility also extends beyond these extreme circumstances in order to promote inclusion and to increase access to quality teaching and learning.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.