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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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46 - 60 of 96
Application of ISO 26000 in digital education during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Weiwei Zhao; Jingshu Zhang; Xia Liu (et al.)

Published: November 2021   Journal: Ain Shams Engineering Journal
Digital education in schools through artificial intelligence, big data and other technologies is conducive to improving teaching efficiency and promoting teaching progress. Unfortunately, many schools lack a sense of social responsibility when applying digital education. Students are online more than ever before. There are the potential for increased exposure to risks such as exposure to harmful content, cyberbullying, age-inappropriate advertising and data misuse, which affect students’ well-being and undermine their right to privacy. Schools should bear the overall social moral level of social responsibility. This paper focuses on the social responsibility of schools under the new crown epidemic and holds that implanting social responsibility into the value system of the current digital education reform, which can promote the sustainable development of education. This is also a relatively neglected problem in the practice of educational reform. European standard: ISO26000 is adopted as a CEN-standard. 21 October 2020 the stakeholder consultation process in the European Committee for Standardization (CEN) decided that ISO 26000 is approved as a CEN-standard. For businesses and organizations committed to operating in a socially responsible way, there’s ISO 26000. It provides guidance to those who recognize that respect for society and environment is a critical success factor. This paper highlights the school how to take social responsibility by using ISO 26000.
Ensuring equal access to education in future crises: findings of the new Remote learning readiness index
Institution: *UNICEF
Published: October 2021

The COVID-19 pandemic has put tremendous pressure on education systems around the world. While schooling and learning were interrupted for hundreds of millions of children worldwide, the pandemic also accelerated the provision of remote learning as a viable solution during emergency events. As school closures are not unique to the COVID-19 outbreak and can take place due to conflicts, disease outbreaks, natural or man-made disasters, strengthening the resilience of the education sector against these negative shocks is critical for human capital gains and inclusive and equitable education for all. A country-level assessment of educational resilience in relation to crises is essential to accelerate the efforts of the international community and national stakeholders in “building back better,” i.e., recovering from the learning losses caused by the disruption of in-person classroom during the COVID-19 pandemic.

School–family relations: an educational challenge in times of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Mario Ferreras-Listán; Coral I. Hunt-Gómez; Pilar Moreno-Crespo (et al.)

Published: October 2021   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
The COVID-19 pandemic has widened the gap regarding access to educational opportunities, which was included in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). This descriptive, quantitative study aims to examine the communication strategies employed by secondary schools in Spain during the lockdown, as well as to analyse the co-responsibility of the educational process between schools and families. An ad hoc questionnaire (GIESBAFCOV-19) was designed and implemented to gather information. The results show that, in most cases, mothers were responsible for assisting and supervising their children’s homework as persons in charge of education-related matters. Additionally, before the lockdown was put in place, about half of the participating families received information from the educative centres regarding the disease and sanitary measures. Once the lockdown took place, families put the focus on their children’s schoolwork, not without difficulties in academic and digital literacy.
Teacher well-being and perceived school climate during COVID-19 school closure: the case of physical education in Switzerland

AUTHOR(S)
Valérian Cece; Emma Guillet-Descas; Vanessa Lentillon-Kaestner

Published: October 2021   Journal: The Teacher Educator
School closure and distance learning during the COVID-19 lockdown had the potential to affect teachers’ perception of their well-being and of the school climate. Within the teaching community, physical education (PE) teachers particularly redesigned their activities during school closures, posing both opportunities and threats. The study aim was to contribute to the understanding of the teachers’ well-being experiences (burnout and engagement) and school climate perceptions during the lockdown for PE teachers in comparison with those of teachers of other subjects.
Primary school mathematics during the COVID-19 pandemic: no evidence of learning gaps in adaptive practicing results

AUTHOR(S)
Martijn Meeter

Published: October 2021   Journal: Trends in Neuroscience and Education

The COVID-19 pandemic induced many governments to close schools for months. Evidence so far suggests that learning has suffered as a result. Here, it is investigated whether forms of computer-assisted learning mitigated the decrements in learning observed during the lockdown. Performance of 53,656 primary school students who used adaptive practicing software for mathematics was compared to performance of similar students in the preceding year.

Developing flipped learning resources to support secondary school mathematics teaching during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Chung Kwan Lo; Ka Luen Cheung; Ho Russell Chan (et al.)

Published: September 2021   Journal: Interactive Learning Environments
Teachers and students have experienced an unusual year in 2020 because of the COVID-19 pandemic. To minimize the risk of the epidemic spreading, face-to-face lecturing hours have been reduced, resulting in a substantial need for online instruction. This project thus aims to develop open access flipped learning resources (e.g. dynamic courseware and instructional videos) for secondary school mathematics teachers and students in Hong Kong. The overarching goal of this study is to make theoretically and empirically supported suggestions for developing the resources. Experiential learning theory was used as the theoretical foundation for developing the resources. A three-cycle recursive instructional design approach involving 34 mathematics educators was used to develop and improve materials that better meet the needs of frontline teachers.
Teacher expectations and parental stress during emergency distance learning and their relationship to students’ perception

AUTHOR(S)
Ariana Garrote; Edith Niederbacher; Jan Hofmann (et al.)

Published: September 2021   Journal: Frontiers in Psychology
School closures in spring 2020 caused by the COVID-19 pandemic were an unprecedented and drastic event for students, parents, and teachers. The unplanned adaptation of classroom instruction to emergency distance learning was necessary to ensure continued education. In this new learning environment, teachers formed expectations for student academic achievement gains, which in turn affected the opportunities for students to learn. Parents faced new challenges in supporting their children’s learning. According to parenting stress models, such drastic events can be a stress factor for parents, which in turn affects their children’s adjustment. This study analyzed the extent to which parents and teachers affected the perceptions of students in compulsory school toward distance learning through processes at home (individual level) and at the class level with data from multiple informants. On an individual level, the relationship between parents’ perceived threat of COVID-19 and their stress due to distance learning and students’ perceived threat of COVID-19 and their perception of distance learning were examined. Students’ learning behavior was accounted for as a variable related to their perception of distance learning. At the class level, the explanatory character of teacher expectations and class-aggregated achievement gains were examined. Data on students in grades 4 to 8, parents, and teachers in Switzerland were collected with standardized online questionnaires after the period of school closures.
Teaching and testing by phone in a pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Lee Crawfurd; David K. Evans; Susannah Hares (et al.)

Institution: Center for Global Development
Published: September 2021
How did children learn while schools were closed during 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic? In low-income countries where internet access is scarce, distance learning is often passive, via TV or radio, with little opportunity for teacher-student interaction. In this paper we evaluate the effectiveness of live tutoring calls from teachers, using a randomized controlled trial with 4,399 primary school students in Sierra Leone. Tutoring calls increased engagement in educational activity but had no effect on mathematics or language test scores, for girls or boys. We also make a methodological contribution, testing the reliability of student assessments conducted by phone. Phone-based assessments have sensible properties, but we find suggestive evidence that scores are higher than with in-person assessments, and there is differential item functioning across survey modes for most individual questions.
Students’ affective engagement, parental involvement, and teacher support in emergency remote teaching during the COVID-19 pandemic: Evidence from a cross-sectional survey in China

AUTHOR(S)
Yang Yang; Keqiao Liu; Miao Li (et al.)

Published: August 2021   Journal: Journal of Research on Technology in Education
Emergency remote teaching has been widely implemented in the education system worldwide to cope with the COVID-19 pandemic. Drawing upon data from a cross-sectional survey conducted in eight middle schools in eastern China (a sample size of 1,550 students and 1,550 parents), we employed multiple linear regressions with school fixed effects to examine the associations among student affective engagement, parental involvement, and teacher support in an emergency remote teaching environment. Our results show that higher levels of parental involvement and teacher support are associated with higher levels of student affective engagement with teacher support presenting the strongest relationship with student engagement. These findings contribute to the understanding of emergency remote teaching in different countries where schools and individual households devise varying strategies and solutions.
Collaborating with parents during COVID-19 online teaching: special educator perspectives

AUTHOR(S)
Rachel K. Schuck; Rachel Lambert; Mian Wang

Published: August 2021   Journal: Education 3-13
Teachers whose students had trouble independently accessing the online curriculum during COVID-19 online learning had to rely heavily on parents. This paper presents findings from interviews with elementary special educators regarding their experiences collaborating with parents while teaching online. Thematic analysis generated four themes: prioritising non-academic support; increases in mutual understanding; parents implementing educational content; and providing feedback to parents. Teachers emphasised providing socio-emotional support to families and reported opportunities for teachers and parents to learn more about each other. They also highlighted several skills that were not smoothly translating to the home. Implications regarding strong teacher–parent partnerships are discussed.
It’s not homeschool, it’s school at home: parents’ experiences as teachers during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Debra P. Price; Jamey Peersman; Savannah Matherne

Published: July 2021   Journal: Educational Media International
This article explores the oral histories of five parents from the United States and Europe who found themselves teaching their children at home, last spring, when school buildings closed in response to the COVID −19 pandemic. Their stories resulted from interviews conducted via Zoom. This article examines data exclusively shared through an interview process. In addition to the oral histories, thematic analysis was conducted in order to facilitate the communication of themes to education policy holders and administration. Of particular importance were the influences of virtual learning and technology, both hardware and software. Themes based on issues of communication, support, learning environments and curriculum give insight into how schools and communities might respond differently to future events where school buildings are closed, but school remains in session.
Serbian teachers’ perceptions of online assessment during COVID-19 school closure: the role of teachers’ self-efficacy

AUTHOR(S)
Stefan Ninković; Stanislava Olić Ninković; Tihomir Lazarević (et al.)

Published: July 2021   Journal: Educational Studies
The COVID-19 pandemic has led to the temporary closure of schools around the world. Due to the sudden and complete transition to online instruction, teachers were faced with various challenges. The assessment of student performance is one of the integrative segments of remote teaching. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the relationship between teachers’ perceptions of online assessment and different facets of self-efficacy. The study involved 147 primary and secondary school teachers who completed an online survey.
Remote learning : evidence from Nepal during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Karthika Radhakrishnan; Shwetlena Sabarwal; Uttam Sharma

Institution: The World Bank
Published: July 2021
This note discusses early results from a distance education program on foundational numeracy for primary school students in Nepal during Coronavirus (COVID-19) evaluated in a randomized trial. The trial included 3,700 households with children in public school (grades 3-5). It provided support for foundational numeracy through mobile phone-based tutoring. The trial tested delivery through public school teachers and also through NGO facilitators. It led to a 30 percent increase in foundational numeracy, with teachers being slightly more effective at producing learning gains than NGO facilitators. These results suggest that instructional support through mobile phones can be a high-access and low-cost approach to providing instruction at scale.
Trainee Teachers’ Perceptions of Online Teaching During Field Experience with Young Children

AUTHOR(S)
Laila Mohebi; Lawrence Meda

Published: July 2021   Journal: Early Childhood Education Journal
The global pandemic of COVID-19 forced trainee teachers from the United Arab Emirates to have virtual field experiences in the field of early childhood education. The various stakeholders, young children, families, preservice teachers, and university faculty hold different perceptions of online teaching formats. The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of trainee teachers and faculty supervisors about online field experiences with young children. The study was done using a qualitative case study within an interpretivist paradigm. Twelve internship students and five supervisors were purposively selected to complete open-ended questionnaires about virtual field experiences.
The Covid-19 pandemic teaching modalities in Turkey: an evaluation of school gardens and classes

AUTHOR(S)
Murat Başeğmez; Cevdet Coşkun Aydın

Published: July 2021   Journal: Health Policy and Technology

The main scientific contribution of this study is to design an approach that can regulate school safety and student health in gardens and classes during the pandemic period using GIS. The method of this study is based on the use of school areas and building data, the creation of 4m2 social distance areas for students, and the evaluation of these areas in terms of health measures. To this aim, first, the relevant guidelines issued by the government institutions in Turkey during the COVID-19 process were examined, in relation to how they will reflect on education policies regarding the sanitary safety of schools. This data was obtained from open-source data sets. Then, in the application stage, 20 schools were selected in order to analyse the sustainability of education in the Balgat district. In addition, the sanitary conditions of classrooms and garden areas were evaluated within the framework of educational policies, taking into account the capabilities of geographical information systems (GIS).

46 - 60 of 96

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.