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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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Transitioning a home-based, motivational interviewing intervention among families to remote delivery during the COVID-19 pandemic: key lessons learned

AUTHOR(S)
Lisa Tang; Rebecca Lewis; Julia Broad (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Patient Education and Counseling
This study examined the experiences, learnings, and strategies of Health Educators (HE) as they transitioned from a home-based model for motivational interviewing (MI) to remote delivery during COVID-19. The overall goal of this paper is to identify key lessons learned to help inform future delivery of remote MI delivery.
Digital literacy in education systems across ASEAN: key insights and opinions of young people
Institution: *UNICEF
Published: February 2021
Strengthening the digital literacy of its youth populations has been a key challenge for ASEAN countries. Digital literacy refers to a person’s ability to use digital platforms for finding, consuming, evaluating, creating and communicating digital content. In an increasingly digitalized world, young people’s success often depends on such skills as it determines their capability to participate in a modern labour force and make well-informed decisions on matters that affect their lives. The COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated the digital transformation of ASEAN societies and further highlighted the importance of digital literacy . The educational, private and work life of young people has changed dramatically with the rise of online learning and remote working. Investing in the digital skills of young girls and boys will help them adapt to this new situation, acquire new skills and knowledge, increase their ability to connect with different people and communities and express their voices, contribute to the success of ASEAN businesses in increasingly competitive global markets and help ASEAN nations to achieve their social development goals through its empowering effect on young people.
Treatment of eating disorders in adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic: a case series

AUTHOR(S)
Yaffa Serur; Marit Joffe-Milstein; Itai Pessach

Published: February 2021   Journal: Journal of Eating Disorders

Eating disorders (EDs) are among the most difficult psychiatric disorders to treat in normal conditions. They are likely even more difficult to manage in at-risk conditions such as the COVID-19 pandemic. Currently there is limited evidence about the particular needs and recommended treatment of adolescents with EDs during the COVID-19 outbreak, in particular regarding the use of telemedicine and the involvement of the family in long distance-treatment. We sought to discuss the advantages and problems associated with the use of multi-professional long-distance telemedicine treatment in the management of adolescents with EDs and their families during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Comprehensive and safe school strategy during COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Susanna Esposito; Nicola Cotugno; Nicola Principi

Published: January 2021   Journal: Italian Journal of Pediatrics
Although several studies have tried to evaluate the real efficacy of school closure for pandemic control over time, no definitive answer to this question has been given. Moreover, it has not been clarified whether children or teenagers could be considered a problem for SARS-CoV-2 diffusion or, on the contrary, whether parents and school workers play a greater role. The aims of this review are to discuss about children’s safety at school and the better strategies currently able to reduce the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection at school.
Children and telehealth in mental healthcare: what we have learned from COVID‐19 and 40,000+ sessions

AUTHOR(S)
Gabriel Hoffnung; Esther Feigenbaum; Ayelet Schechter (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Psychiatric Research and Clinical Practice

Of the many impacts of COVID‐19 on contemporary healthcare is the rapid and overwhelming shift to remote telehealth (TH) service. The precise effect of TH on treatment is yet unknown, and the possible child/adult differences are an essential point of clarification for the utility of TH services and efforts to improve upon them.The current study considers data reflecting pre‐, during‐, and post‐COVID‐19 lockdown over the first six months of 2020.

Conducting CBT for anxiety in children with autism spectrum disorder during COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Carla B. Kalvin; Rebecca P. Jordan; Sonia N. Rowley (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
This commentary describes the transition to remote delivery of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who participates in a clinical trial during the COVID-19 pandemic. The effects of COVID-19 on children’s anxiety and on the family functioning are discussed. Modifications to CBT necessitated by telehealth delivery were aimed at maximizing engagement of children and their parents while maintaining treatment fidelity and adhering to the research protocol. Treatment targets were updated to address new sources of anxiety and CBT exposure exercises were modified to accommodate the new reality of quarantine restrictions. If the COVID-19 pandemic continues to affect treatment delivery it may require a widespread utilization of telehealth for treating anxiety in children with ASD.
Risk assessment and crisis intervention for youth in a time of telehealth

AUTHOR(S)
Melissa Holland; Jessica Hawks; Lauren C. Morelli (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Contemporary School Psychology
For the last decade, there has been growing concern regarding the rising rates of youth engagement in self-injury and suicide. The worldwide outbreak of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has elevated these concerns due to increased risk factors pertaining to social, family, economic, and health stressors, in addition to changes to typical routines and support systems. Unfortunately, there are many barriers to at-risk youth being able to access evidence-based mental health services including cost, lack of trained providers, transportation issues, and physical distancing due to the pandemic. Providing school-based prevention and intervention programs that promote social, emotional, and behavioral well-being helps to address many of these barriers. This article highlights important considerations to providing these services in a school-based telehealth modality.
The impact of closing schools on working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic: evidence using panel data from Japan

AUTHOR(S)
Eiji Yamamura; Yoshiro Tsustsui

Published: January 2021   Journal: Review of Economics of the Household
COVID-19 has led to the closure of various schools in Japan to cope with the pandemic. This study explores how school closure influences parents’ work style based on short panel data for the period of school closure from mid-March to mid-April 2020. Specifically, it analyzes how the presence of their children influences parents’ work at home and examines how the effect differs by the parent’s gender.
Using hybrid telepractice for supporting parents of children with ASD during the COVID-19 lockdown: a feasibility study in Iran

AUTHOR(S)
Sayyed Ali Samadi; Shahnaz Bakhshalizadeh-Moradi; Fatemeh Khandani (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Brain Science
During the three-month closure of clinics and day centers in Iran due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) lockdown, parents of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) became solely responsible for their care and education. Although centers maintained telephone contact, it quickly became evident that parents needed more detailed advice and guidance. Staff from 30 daycare centers volunteered to take part in a two-month online support and training course for 336 caregivers of children with ASD of different ages. In addition to the provision of visual and written information, synchronous video sessions were used to coach parents on the learning goals devised for the children. Both qualitative and quantitative data were collected to understand the acceptability of using telepractice and the outcomes achieved. A low dropout rate and positive feedback from parents indicated that they perceived telepractice sessions to be useful. The factors contributing to parents’ satisfaction were identified. Although the use of telepractice would be a good alternative for caregivers in any future lockdowns, it could also be used in conjunction with daycare center services to encourage greater parental participation, or with families living in areas with no day centers. Further studies are needed to compare telepractice to usual daycare face-to-face interventions, and to document its impact and cost-effectiveness for parents and children.
Working from home vs learning from home: a critical investigation and analysis during the COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Afzal Sayed Munna; M. Sadeque Imam Shaikh

Published: November 2020   Journal: Asian Journal of Education and Social Studies
The article aimed to make a critical investigation and analysis on working from home vs learning from home during the COVID-19. Small-scale research was conducted only targeting parents (having at least one school going child) to capture the view of how they deem the concept of working from home vs learning from home and whether there are any reservations among both concepts. The findings from the 36 respondents’ feedback suggest that parents often prefer working from home (wherever possible) but the same parent does not want their child to learn from home. The research shows that most parents believe remote working leads to higher productivity and leads to cost-effectiveness and remote learnings deteriorate creativity.
Distance support and online intervention to blind and visually impaired children during the pandemic COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Tiziana Battistin; Elena Mercuriali; Vincenzo Zanardo (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Research in Developmental Disabilities
The COVID-19 pandemic imposed dramatic changes to everyone’s daily routines, but especially to children with developmental disabilities. The Robert Hollman Foundation decided not to interrupt its service to all the visually impaired children and initiated a Distance Support Project. It was an online process covering all aspects of support for the children and involving audio-video calls, videos and tailored-made multisensory material created specifically for each child.
Pediatric Teleheath: opportunities created by the COVID-19 and suggestions to sustain its use to support families of children with disabilities

AUTHOR(S)
Chantal Camden; Mindy Silva

Published: October 2020   Journal: Physical & Occupational Therapy In Pediatrics
Telehealth is being rapidly adopted by physical and occupational therapists in pediatrics as a strategy to maintain services during the COVID-19 crisis. This perspective presents a mix of theoretical and practice perspectives to support the implementation of telehealth. Although research evidence is just emerging, there is sufficient indication to believe telehealth is effective. However, which telehealth strategies are best for which children and families, and which intervention goals, are not yet clear.
Child and adolescent psychiatry telemedicine: a Singaporean experience born in Covid-19

AUTHOR(S)
Ngar Yee Poon; Shirley Pat Fong; Shirley Pat Fong

Published: October 2020   Journal: Asian Journal of Psychiatry
Singapore was one of the first Asian countries to be affected by the Covid-19 outbreak. The article shares the experience of a consultation liaison psychiatry service within the largest women and children’s hospital in Singapore. The adoption of telepsychiatry has enabled continuous provision of care whilst reducing unnecessary exposure to COVID-19. This clinical case demonstrates the clinical utility of the telemedicine service for youth mental healthcare during the pandemic. 
COVID-19 pandemic-related practices and policies affecting the continuity of behavioral health care among children With diabetes

AUTHOR(S)
Lauren Clary; Christine Wang; Meghan E. Byrne (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Translational Behavioral Medicine
COVID-19 has led to substantial challenges in continuing to deliver behavioral health care to all patients, including children with chronic diseases. In the case of diabetes, maintaining strong connections among children, their families, and their care team is essential to promote and sustain daily adherence to a complex medical regimen. The purpose of this paper is to describe COVID-19 pandemic-related practices and policies affecting the continuity of behavioral health care among children with diabetes.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 10 | Issue: 4 | No. of pages: 819-826 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child care services, child health, COVID-19 response, lockdown, teleworking, diabetes
How has COVID-19 changed family life and well-being in Korea?

AUTHOR(S)
Jaerim Lee; Meejung Chin; Miai Sung

Published: August 2020   Journal: Journal of Comparative Family Studies
The main purpose of this paper is to discuss how COVID-19 has impacted Korean families. The economic well-being of Korean families has been threatened because many family members lost their jobs or earned reduced incomes due to the pandemic. COVID-19 substantially changed the work environment and has provided the momentum for the growth of flexible work including telecommuting in Korea, which was not commonly used before the pandemic. However, the work-from-home arrangements created an ambiguous boundary between work and family, particularly among employed mothers because childcare facilities and schools were closed during COVID-19. The postponed 2020 school year started with online schooling in April, and children in secondary schools often continued private education during the pandemic. Although COVID-19 provided an opportunity to build emotional ties for some families, many Korean families who were stuck at home experienced relational difficulties. Socioeconomic and gender inequality along with discrimination against certain groups were heightened.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.