search advanced search
UNICEF Innocenti
Office of Research-Innocenti
search menu

Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

RESULTS:   5     SORT BY:
Prev 1 Next

ADVANCED SEARCH:

Select one or more filter options and click search below.

PUBLICATION DATE:
UNICEF Innocenti Publication
UNICEF Publication
Open Access
JOURNAL ACCESS FOR UNICEF STAFF CONTACT US
1 - 5 of 5
First Prev 1 Next Last
Family day care educators’ ability to support children’s mental wellbeing and the impact of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Zoi Triandafilidis; Ashleigh Old; Tanya Hanstock (et al.)

Published: May 2022   Journal: Journal of Early Childhood Research
The childcare setting is a critical environment to observe, and also influence, children’s mental wellbeing. However, little research has examined the experiences and ability of Australian family day care (FDC) educators in supporting children’s mental wellbeing. The present study aimed to explore how training, COVID-19, and partnerships influence FDC educators’ ability to promote children’s mental wellbeing. Seven FDC educators engaged in semi-structured interviews, and thematic analysis identified six themes. These were (1) more than a babysitter; (2) experience is the best teacher; (3) close and supportive relationships, which included a sense of exile as a subordinate theme; (4) it takes a village to raise a child; (5) fear and uncertainty; and (6) business and relational difficulties.
When a school is more than just a school: Improving school-based health in the wake of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Simon F. Haeder; Emily Maxfield; Kara Ulmen (et al.)

Published: March 2022   Journal: World Medical & Health Policy
The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has posed tremendous challenges for economies and individuals around the world. At the same time, it has also laid bare the blatant and growing inequities that many individuals, particularly children, are confronted with on a daily basis. With communities in lockdowns and schools going virtual in many parts of the United States, the important role that schools and school-based services play in the lives of many children have gained new attention. Nonetheless, only 3% of American schools have school-based health centers on campus, and they remain relegated to the fringes of both health care and education. One key limitation has been the lack of appropriately trained health-care professionals. Over the past 2 years, dozens of individuals have been interviewed about their experiences in school-based health centers. Based on this study, this study explores what it means for a health-care professional to work in school-based health care and how it differs from more traditional health-care settings. This analysis particularly focuses on training and education, work environments, and their unique demands that come from being embedded within the educational setting. It concludes by addressing the important role that governmental policies could play in augmenting this crucial workforce.
Development, feasibility, and acceptability of a nationally relevant parent training to improve service access during the transition to adulthood for youth with ASD

AUTHOR(S)
Julie Lounds Taylor; Florencia Pezzimenti; Meghan M. Burke (et al.)

Published: July 2021   Journal: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Many youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) face challenges accessing needed services as they transition to adulthood. The present study describes the development, feasibility and acceptability of a new intervention designed to teach parents of transition-aged youth with ASD about the adult service system and the most effective ways to access services and supports. As part of a randomized-controlled trial, the intervention—named ASSIST—was delivered to 91 participants in three states in the U.S. Results suggested that ASSIST is feasible and acceptable to participants. Though intended to be an in-person group-based program, due to COVID-19 restrictions ASSIST was primarily delivered online.
Acceptability and feasibility of using digital technology to train community practitioners to deliver a family-based intervention for adolescents with drug use disorders during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Anja Busse; Wataru Kashino; Sanita Suhartono (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: Addictive Behaviors Reports

By adhering to government preventative messages to stay-at-home and social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic, training practitioners in person in implementing a family-based intervention (i.e., Treatnet Family) is not possible. The present study examined the feasibility and acceptability of using digital technology to remotely deliver Treatnet Family training to practitioners in community counselling services in Indonesia. Fifteen practitioners, from the association of addiction counsellors in Indonesia, participated in the Treatnet Family workshop remotely. The training was delivered by four national Treatnet Family trainers remotely via a digital platform for five days with additional take-home assignments.

Child-rearing during postgraduate medical training and its relation to stress and burnout: results from a single-institution multispecialty survey

AUTHOR(S)
Marguerite W. Spruce; Alicia A. Gingrich; Amanda Phares (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Military Medicine
Child-rearing is difficult for medical trainees during the Covid-19 era, but much of the available evidence is limited to individual specialties or lacks an analysis of well-being. In light of this, this study sought to examine current perspectives across a wide range of medical specialties, determine associations with stress and burnout, and identify potential supportive solutions. After Institutional Review Board approval, a voluntary and anonymous survey was sent to all residents and fellows at a large academic medical center with a U.S. Air Force joint training agreement in 2019. Frequency tables were generated for survey responses, using χ 2 test for analysis between groups.
1 - 5 of 5
First Prev 1 Next Last

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE DATABASE

Read the latest quarterly digest on children and disabilities.

The second digest discussed children and violence during the pandemic.

The first digest covers children and youth mental health under COVID-19.

Subscribe to updates on new research about COVID-19 & children

SIGN UP TO OUR NEWSLETTER

Share:

facebook twitter linkedin google+ reddit print email
Campaign Campaign

COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.