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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1 - 15 of 34
Pregnant women perspectives on SARS-COV-2 vaccine

AUTHOR(S)
Luigi Carbone; Ilenia Mappa; Angelo Sirico (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology
Since COVID-19 vaccines have been distributed, a debate has raised on whether pregnant women should get the vaccine. No available data exist so far regarding safety, efficacy and toxicology of these vaccines when administered during pregnancy. Most of the Obstetrics and Gynecology societies suggested that pregnant could agree to be vaccinated, after a thorough counseling of risks and benefits with their gynecologists, thus leading to an autonomous decision. The aim of this study was to evaluate the attitude to COVID-19 vaccination in pregnant and breastfeeding women in Italy.
Future vaccinations in pregnancy

AUTHOR(S)
D. Vress

Published: March 2021   Journal: Best Practice & Research Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology

Vaccination in pregnancy provides an important opportunity to target illnesses that are known to impact particularly on pregnant women, fetal development and cause newborn illness. The ability to create antibodies via safe vaccination that cross the placenta can provide protection against maternal, congenital and newborn infection. There are currently multiple vaccines being developed which have direct benefits for pregnant women and their newborns. Group B Streptococcus, Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Cytomegalovirus, Zika, Ebola, Malaria and coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 are all being researched with the view to developing a safe vaccine available for pregnant women. There is also an increased movement towards including pregnant women in vaccine development and trials, challenging the historical, ethical and medicolegal arguments against their involvement in such research.

Demographic, psychological, and experiential correlates of SARS-CoV-2 vaccination intentions in a sample of Canadian families

AUTHOR(S)
Christine L. Lackner; Charles H. Wang

Published: March 2021   Journal: Vaccine: X
The COVID-19 pandemic has been ongoing for close to a year, with second waves occurring presently and many viewing vaccine uptake as the most likely way to curb successive waves and promote herd immunity. Reaching herd immunity status likely necessitates that children, as well as their parents, receive a vaccine targeting SARS-CoV-2. This exploratory study investigated the demographic, experiential, and psychological factors associated with the anticipated likelihood and speed of having children receive a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine in a sample of 455 Canadian families (858 children; parents’ mean age = 38.2 ± 6.82 years).
Effectiveness of the 2019–2020 influenza vaccine and the effect of prior influenza infection and vaccination in children during the first influenza season overlapping with the COVID-19 epidemic

AUTHOR(S)
Soichiro Ando

Published: March 2021   Journal: Journal of Nippon Medical School

The behavioral changes among Japanese, along with the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic, may affect the seasonal influenza epidemic in Japan and change the influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE). Influenza VE in children was estimated in the first influenza season (2019/20) overlapping with the COVID-19 epidemic by conducting a single-center, test-negative case-control (TNCC) study. Effects of prior influenza infection and vaccination in children were assessed for the 2019–2020 season.

Monitoring progress of maternal and neonatal immunization in Latin America and the Caribbean

AUTHOR(S)
Martha Velandia-González; Alba Vilajeliu; Marcela Contreras (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Vaccine
The Americas committed to strengthening maternal and neonatal immunization (MNI) through the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) Regional Immunization Action Plan (RIAP)2016–20. This paper describes the progress toward RIAP MNI-related targets and those related to improvement of data quality and information systems; analyze national MNI policies and vaccination coverages; and identify enablers and challenges of monitoring and reporting MNI vaccination coverage in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC).
Are COVID-19 vaccines safe in pregnancy?

AUTHOR(S)
Victoria Male

Published: March 2021   Journal: Nature Reviews Immunology
As the COVID-19 vaccination programme starts to be rolled out, many young women are hesitant to accept the vaccine, citing concerns about fertility. Meanwhile, those offered the vaccine during pregnancy must decide whether they will accept, even though pregnant people were excluded from the clinical trials. Data on accidental pregnancies that occurred during the trials and, increasingly, outcomes in pregnant people who receive the vaccine can help these groups to make informed decisions.
A chance to get it right: achieving equity in COVID-19 vaccine access

AUTHOR(S)
Karrar Karrar; Kirsten Mathieson; Lenio Capsaskis

Institution: Save the Children
Published: March 2021
This briefing calls for a global response and the global, equitable distribution of COVID-19 vaccines in order to make real progress on ending the pandemic and minimizing its impact on children. It makes the case for why this is a matter of rights, equity, public health, and economics and must be addressed as a matter of urgency. It sets out key areas of action for governments, donors, and other key stakeholders.
COVID-19 vaccine acceptance among pregnant women and mothers of young children: results of a survey in 16 countries

AUTHOR(S)
Malia Skjefte; Michelle Ngirbabul; Oluwasefunmi Akeju (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: European Journal of Epidemiology
With the development of multiple effective vaccines, reducing the global morbidity and mortality of COVID-19 will depend on the distribution and acceptance of COVID-19 vaccination. Estimates of global vaccine acceptance among pregnant women and mothers of young children are yet unknown. An understanding of the challenges and correlates to vaccine acceptance will aid the acceleration of vaccine administration within these populations. Acceptance of COVID-19 vaccination among pregnant women and mothers of children younger than 18-years-old, as well as potential predictors, were assessed through an online survey, administered by Pregistry between October 28 and November 18, 2020.
Vaccine trials ramp up in children and adolescents

AUTHOR(S)
Jennifer Couzin-Frankel

Published: February 2021   Journal: Science
As older adults, health care workers, firefighters, and others roll up their sleeves for a COVID-19 vaccine, there's a flurry of research to get shots to children, for whom no vaccine has yet been authorized. Even though young people are less likely to fall seriously ill, doctors and scientists agree that vaccinating them is crucial for their own protection and that of the broader population. And because companies already have solid data from adult trials, they are running smaller studies in children that focus on safety and immune responses to COVID-19 vaccines.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 371 | Issue: 6532 | No. of pages: 874-875 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: adolescent health, child health, vaccination, vaccination policies, COVID-19
The importance of advancing severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2 vaccines in cildren

AUTHOR(S)
Carol M. Kao; Walter A. Orenstein; Evan J. Anderson

Published: February 2021   Journal: Clinical Infectious Diseases
While the role of children in the transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) remains to be defined, children likely play an important role based on our knowledge of other respiratory viruses. Children are more likely to be asymptomatic or have milder symptoms and less likely to present for healthcare and be tested for SARS-CoV-2. Thus, our current estimates are likely under-representative of the true burden of SARS-CoV-2 in children. Given the potential direct benefit of a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine in children and the substantial indirect benefit through community protection, or “herd immunity,” this study argues that planning and implementation of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines should include children.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 72 | Issue: 3 | No. of pages: 515-518 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: disease transmission, respiratory diseases, vaccination, vaccination policies, infectious disease, COVID-19
Preparing for a school-located COVID-19 vaccination clinic

AUTHOR(S)
Katherine Park; Rebecca Cartmill; Belinda Johnson-Gordon (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: NASN School Nurse
School-located vaccination events (SLVE) have a long history in the United States and have successfully contributed to lower morbidity and mortality due to vaccine-preventable diseases. The school is an ideal place to reach children from all cultures, socioeconomic groups, and age-groups and is conveniently situated in communities for ease of accessibility for students, parents, and staff alike. School nurses play an important role in planning for SLVE and are ideally positioned to initiate this process and provide accurate information, dispelling myths about vaccines. Because school nurses are considered a trusted source of health information by the school community, they can provide valuable education on the impact of vaccination on student and staff attendance. Conducting a successful SLVE requires research, planning, and partnerships, and these partnerships are needed both within the school setting and outside this setting, within the community at large.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 7 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: nurses, vaccination, vaccination policies, COVID-19 | Countries: United States
SARS-CoV-2 vaccine testing and trials in the pediatric population: biologic, ethical, research, and implementation challenges

AUTHOR(S)
Dan M. Cooper; Behnoush Afghani; Carrie L. Byington

Published: February 2021   Journal: Pediatric Research
As the nation implements SARS-CoV-2 vaccination in adults at an unprecedented scale, it is now essential to focus on the prospect of SARS-CoV-2 vaccinations in pediatric populations. To date, no children younger than 12 years have been enrolled in clinical trials. Key challenges and knowledge gaps that must be addressed include (1) rationale for vaccines in children, (2) possible effects of immune maturation during childhood, (3) ethical concerns, (4) unique needs of children with developmental disorders and chronic conditions, (5) health inequities, and (6) vaccine hesitancy.
Breastfeeding and COVID-19 vaccination: position statement of the Italian scientific societies

AUTHOR(S)
Riccardo Davanzo; Massimo Agosti; Irene Cetin (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Italian Journal of Pediatrics
The availability of a COVID-19 vaccine has raised the issue of its compatibility with breastfeeding. Consequently, the Italian Society of Neonatology (SIN), the Italian Society of Pediatrics (SIP), the Italian Society of Perinatal Medicine (SIMP), the Italian Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology (SIGO), the Italian Association of Hospital ObstetriciansGynecologists (AOGOI) and the Italian Society of Infectious and Tropical Diseases (SIMIT) have made an ad hoc consensus statement. Currently, knowledge regarding the administration of COVID-19 vaccine to the breastfeeding mother is limited. Nevertheless, as health benefits of breastfeeding are well demonstrated and since biological plausibility suggests that the health risk for the nursed infant is unlikely, Italian scientific societies conclude that COVID-19 vaccination is compatible with breastfeeding.
Willingness to vaccinate children against Influenza after the Coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Ran D. Goldman; Sophie McGregor; Shashidhar R. Marneni (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: The Journal of Pediatrics
This study aims to determine factors associated with parents who plan to vaccinate their children against influenza next year, especially those who did not vaccinate against influenza last year using a global survey. A survey of caregivers accompanying their children aged 1-19 years old in 17 pediatric emergency departments in 6 countries at the peak of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Anonymous online survey included caregiver and child demographic information, vaccination history and future intentions, and concern about the child and caregiver having COVID-19 at the time of emergency department visit.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 228 | No. of pages: 87-93.e2 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: immunization programmes, parents, vaccination, vaccination policies, COVID-19 response | Countries: United States
Evaluation of COVID-19 vaccine refusal in parents

AUTHOR(S)
Metin Yigit; Aslinur Ozkaya-Parlakay; Emrah Senel

Published: January 2021   Journal: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal
The frequency of vaccine refusal, which is associated with many factors, is increasing worldwide. The aim of this study was to predict the frequency of vaccine refusal against domestic and foreign COVID-19 vaccines and identify the factors underlying refusal.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.