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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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31 - 45 of 113
Children and COVID-19 vaccines

AUTHOR(S)
Lindsay A. Thompson; Sonja A. Rasmussen

Published: June 2021   Journal: JAMA Pediatrics

Nearly 4 million children in the US have been infected with COVID-19 as of May 2021. While most children have had mild or no symptoms, thousands have been hospitalized and several hundred have died. Children with underlying conditions are more likely to experience severe effects of COVID-19, but even healthy children can be severely affected. Children can spread COVID-19 to others and also can have long-term effects that last months. For these reasons, children need to be protected from COVID-19. Currently, 3 vaccines are authorized for adults in the United States. In studies of tens of thousands of people, these vaccines were safe and effective. The vaccine made by Pfizer was recently authorized for children 12 years and older. Two doses of this vaccine are recommended to be given 3 weeks apart. The other 2 vaccines were authorized for persons 18 years and older but are expected to be available for teenagers soon. Studies in younger children as young as age 6 months are ongoing and if these studies show that they are safe and effective, vaccines could be available for children 6 months and older by late 2021 or early 2022.

 

ISIDOG consensus guidelines on COVID-19 vaccination for women before, during and after pregnancy

AUTHOR(S)
Gilbert G. G. Donders; Svitrigaile Grinceviciene; Kai Haldre (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: Journal of Clinical Medicine
Sars-CoV-2 infection poses particular problems in pregnancy, as the infection more frequently causes severe complications than in unaffected pregnant women or nonpregnant women with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Now that vaccination is available and rapidly being implemented worldwide, the question arises whether pregnant women should be vaccinated, and if so, whether they should receive priority. Available scientific data and available guidelines about vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 were collected by the Guideline Committee of the International Society of Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology (ISIDOG) and were analyzed, discussed and summarized as guidelines for healthcare workers caring for pregnant women. Concluding statements were graded according to the Oxford evidence-based medicine grading system.
Determinant of intention to receive COVID-19 vaccine among school teachers in Gondar City, Northwest Ethiopia

AUTHOR(S)
Simegnew Handebo; Maereg Wolde; Kegnie Shitu

Published: June 2021   Journal: Plos One

Scientists across the world are working on innovating a successful vaccine that will save lives and end COVID-19 pandemic. World Health Organization (WHO) is working to make sure COVID-19 vaccines can be safely delivered to all those who need them. Indeed, the successful deployment and a sufficient uptake of vaccines is equally important. Acceptance and accessibility of such vaccine is a key indicator of vaccination coverage. This study aimed to assess the determinants of intention to receive COVID-19 vaccine among school teachers in Gondar City.

Parental acceptability of COVID-19 vaccination for children under the age of 18 years among Chinese doctors and nurses: a cross-sectional online survey

AUTHOR(S)
Zixin Wang; Rui She; Xi Chen (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics
This study investigated parental acceptability of COVID-19 vaccination for children under the age of 18 years among Chinese parents who are healthcare workers. A closed online survey among full-time doctors or nurses employed by the five collaborative hospitals who had access to smartphones was conducted. Facilitated by the hospital administrators, prospective participants received an invitation sent by the research team via the existing WeChat/QQ groups to complete an online questionnaire. A total of 2,281 participants completed the survey. This study was a sub-analysis of 1332 participants who had at least one child under the age of 18 years. Among the participants, 44.5% reported that they would likely or very likely to have their children under the age of 18 years take up COVID-19 vaccination in the next six months.
A qualitative study exploring the relationship between mothers’ vaccine hesitancy and health beliefs with COVID-19 vaccination intention and prevention during the early pandemic months

AUTHOR(S)
Kimberly K. Walker; Katharine J. Head; Heather Owens (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics
Vaccine hesitancy is a top ten global health threat that can negatively impact COVID-19 vaccine uptake. It is assumed that vaccine refusers hold deep, negative beliefs, while acceptors hold strong, positive beliefs. However, vaccine hesitancy exists along a continuum and is multidimensional, varying by time, place, vaccine, subgroup, and person. Guided by the Health Belief Model and vaccine hesitancy frameworks, the study purpose was to qualitatively explore maternal COVID-19 threat perceptions and willingness to accept a COVID-19 vaccine in light of their expressed vaccine hesitancy toward past school required and routinely recommended vaccines and the HPV vaccine for their children. Researchers conducted twenty-five interviews with US Midwestern mothers during the early COVID-19 pandemic months. Mothers were grouped by vaccine hesitancy categories and thematic analysis was used to analyze the data within and across categories.
Vaccinating children and adolescents against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2): the Israeli experience

AUTHOR(S)
Daniel Glikman; Michal Stein; Eric S. Shinwell

Published: June 2021   Journal: Acta Paediatrica
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has spread to almost all countries, with many severely affected. Vaccines, in general, have proven their profound value in preventing illnesses and terminating epidemics, as seen for example in measles, polio and smallpox. Vaccines against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) are already showing a significant positive impact on the number of COVID-19 cases in countries with a rapid and effective roll-out of vaccinations. Israel is among world leaders, with an effective vaccination campaign that began at the end of December 2020. Vaccines are free of charge and given to all adults. Indeed, as of 13 May 2021, 63% of the population have received at least one dose and 59% are fully vaccinated.1 Vaccine coverage is lower in minorities in Israel but steadily increasing, as seen for example in the Arab population: in mid-February 2021, 19% were vaccinated with at least one dose, while by May 2021, 54% were already fully vaccinated. Accordingly, the daily number of new COVID-19 cases in Israel has declined from 10 000 at the peak of the third wave in January 2021 to less than 100 in May this year
Vaccination against COVID-19 infection: the need of evidence for diabetic and obese pregnant women

AUTHOR(S)
A. Lapolla; M. G. Dalfrà; S. Burlina

Published: June 2021   Journal: Acta Diabetologica

The recent availability of vaccines against COVID-19 has sparked national and international debate on the feasibility of administering them to pregnant and lactating women, given that these vaccines have not been tested to assess their safety and efficacy in such women. As concerns the risks of COVID-induced disease, published data show that pregnant women who develop COVID-19 have fewer symptoms than patients who are not pregnant, but they are more likely to need hospitalization in intensive care, and neonatal morbidity. Aim of the present perspective paper is to analyze the current literature regarding the use of the vaccine against COVID-19 infection, in terms of safety and protection, in high risk pregnant women as those affected by diabetes and obesity. Analysis of literature about vaccination against COVID-19 infection in pregnancy.

COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among adolescent and young adult cancer survivors

AUTHOR(S)
Austin R. Waters; Deanna Kepka; Joemy M. Ramsay (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: JNCI Cancer Spectrum
The study objective was to identify sociodemographic and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) factors that are associated with COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors. Eligible participants were 18 years or older and were diagnosed with cancer as an AYA (ages 15-39 years) and received services through an AYA cancer program. A total of 342 participants completed a cross-sectional survey.
COVID-19 vaccines for children younger than 12 years: are we ready?

AUTHOR(S)
Xiaohui Zou; Bin Cao

Published: June 2021
On May 5, 2021, Canada became the first country in the world to approve COVID-19 vaccine for emergency use in children aged 12–15 years; later the same month, the US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency also gave the green light to the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine for adolescents. Children younger than 12 years are the next population who need a safe and efficient COVID-19 vaccine. In The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Bihua Han and colleagues reported the results of a double-blind, randomised, controlled, phase 1/2 clinical trial, which showed that the inactivated COVID-19 vaccine (CoronaVac) had good safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity in youths aged 3–17 years. This promising result should inspire the ongoing trial of other COVID-19 vaccines in children younger than 12 years.
Safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of an inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine (CoronaVac) in healthy children and adolescents: a double-blind, randomised, controlled, phase 1/2 clinical trial

AUTHOR(S)
Bihua Han; Yufei Song; Changgui Li (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: The Lancet Infectious Diseases
A vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 for children and adolescents will play an important role in curbing the COVID-19 pandemic. This study aimed to assess the safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of a candidate COVID-19 vaccine, CoronaVac, containing inactivated SARS-CoV-2, in children and adolescents aged 3–17 years.
Parental psychological distress and attitudes towards COVID-19 vaccination: a cross-sectional survey in Shenzhen, China

AUTHOR(S)
Yucheng Xu; Ruiyin Zhang; Zhifeng Zhou

Published: June 2021   Journal: Journal of Affective Disorders

Parental attitudes towards the vaccines play a key role in the success of the herd immunity for the COVID-19. Psychological health seems to be a controversial determinant of vaccine hesitancy and remains to be investigated. This study attempted to measure parental psychological distress, attitudes towards the COVID-19 vaccine, and to explore the potential associations. An online survey using convenience sampling method was conducted among parents within the school public health network of Shenzhen. Demographic information and attitudes towards COVID-19 vaccination were collected. The Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-4) was applied to measure psychological distress.

Methodologic approaches in studies using real-world data (RWD) to measure pediatric safety and effectiveness of vaccines administered to pregnant women: a scoping review

AUTHOR(S)
Tamar Lasky; Ann W. McMahon; Wei Hua (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: Vaccine

This scoping review mapped studies using real-world data (RWD) to measure pediatric safety and effectiveness of vaccines administered to pregnant women. In the US, two vaccines are recommended for all pregnant women to prevent illness in the infant: inactivated influenza vaccine (recommended since 2004), and the combined tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine (recommended since 2013). This scoping review maps the studies conducted to date that address questions about pediatric safety and effectiveness of vaccines administered during pregnancy and provides a knowledge base for evaluating the use of RWD to study this issue.

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 39 | Issue: 29 | No. of pages: 3814-3824 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: COVID-19, infectious disease, maternal and child health, pregnancy, pregnant women, vaccination, vaccination policies | Countries: United States
Maternal vaccines during the Covid-19 pandemic: a qualitative interview study with UK pregnant women

AUTHOR(S)
Amberly Brigden; Anna Davies; Emily Shepherd (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: Midwifery

There is suboptimal uptake of recommended maternal vaccines (pertussis and influenza) during pregnancy in the UK. The Covid-19 pandemic has impacted healthcare services, and potentially vaccine coverage, and brought the need for new vaccines to be tested and rolled out. This study aims to explore: i) the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on pregnant women's access to, and attitudes towards, routine maternal vaccines and; ii) women's attitudes towards testing Covid-19 vaccines on pregnant women and their personal willingness to take part in such a trial.

Impact and projections of the COVID-19 epidemic on attendance and routine vaccinations at a pediatric referral hospital in Cameroon

AUTHOR(S)
D. Chelo; F. Nguefack; D. Enyama (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: Archives de Pédiatrie

At the beginning of March 2020, Cameroon experienced its first cases of infection with the new coronavirus (SARS-COV-2). Very quickly, there was a drop in the rate of hospital attendance. The purpose of this study was to observe the variations in the uptake of pediatric consultations and vaccinations in a pediatric hospital. A descriptive and retrospective cross-sectional study was carried out using consultation and vaccination statistics from a pediatric hospital in the city of Yaoundé, political capital of Cameroon, from January 2016 to May 2020.

High risk, low priority: refugees excluded from COVID-19 vaccine rollout

AUTHOR(S)
Delphine Vallette; Nina Nepesova; Natalia Korobkova (et al.)

Institution: World Vision
Published: June 2021
The COVID-19 crisis has affected everyone, but people living on the world’s margins, including the forcibly displaced who face some of the highest risks but remain the lowest priority in national and global responses to the pandemic. Yet, vaccine justice is not only essential to protect the most at risk but it is also critical to prevent even more catastrophic impact globally. The pandemic will not end anywhere until it ends everywhere
31 - 45 of 113

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.