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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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16 - 30 of 383
Development of a brief group CBT intervention to reduce COVID-19-related distress among school-age youth

AUTHOR(S)
Natalie Rodriguez-Quintana; Allison E. Meyer; Emily Bilek (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
School-aged youth have been significantly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. The effects of the pandemic will likely have long-standing effects on the well-being of youth, and access to mental health care is even more critical during this time. For the past 5 years, TRAILS (Transforming Research into Action to Improve the Lives of Students) has been working throughout the state to increase utilization of evidence-based mental health practices among K-12 school mental health professionals (SMHPs). By leveraging SMHPs who are widely accessible to students, TRAILS seeks to improve youth access to effective mental health care and reduce current mental health inequities. In March 2020, TRAILS responded to the COVID-19 pandemic by developing a group manual designed to be delivered virtually by SMHPs to help students develop effective coping skills to mitigate the impact of COVID-19.
A lost year of learning for girls in Ethiopia: evidence from the Young lives at work COVID-19 phone survey

AUTHOR(S)
Catherine Porter; Alula Pankhurst; Kath Ford

Institution: Young Lives
Published: April 2021
This policy brief looks at the impact of COVID-19 on girls’ education in Ethiopia, summarising findings from the Young Lives COVID-19 phone survey (consisting of three calls between June–December 2020) in relation to the Younger Cohort in the study, now aged 19. Our findings also highlight the importance of addressing associated gender issues in relation to increasing levels of domestic work and risks of early marriage, as well as worsening mental health, to avoid the longerterm impacts of a lost year of education.
Cite this research | No. of pages: 6 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: COVID-19 response, education of girls, lockdown, social distance, women's education | Countries: Ethiopia | Publisher: Young Lives
Sub-Saharan Africa: growing up in crisis in a world of opportunities: the lasting impact of Covid-19 on children
Institution: *UNICEF
Published: April 2021

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound effect on the world’s population. Although it has been established that children are at lower risk of falling seriously ill with COVID-19, the pandemic has had, and continues to have, far-reaching effects on them. The pandemic poses a health crisis that has become a child rights’ crisis. It is heightening the impact of conflict and climate change on children. In sub-Saharan Africa, COVID-19 is exacerbating not only existing threats to the future that 550 million children face, but also measures put in place to control and contain the disease. While the arrival of the first vaccines brings hope to put an end to the pandemic, it will take time before these vaccines can reach everyone who needs them. This report sheds light on the various ways children in sub-Saharan Africa have been affected by the ongoing pandemic and how UNICEF and partners have been supporting them. The report also is a call to action to governments and the international community to take concerted action to mitigate the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and associated control measures, and build forward a better world fit for children.

The COVID-19 school closure effect on students’ print and digital leisure reading

AUTHOR(S)
Baoqi Sun; Chin Ee Loh; Youyan Nie

Published: April 2021   Journal: Computers and Education Open
Adopting an explanatory sequential mixed methods design, this study examined Singaporean primary school students’ changes in reading enjoyment, reading amount, and their access to resources in print and digital formats during the COVID-19 school closure. Survey data showed reading was a more preferred leisure activity during the school closure. Students’ reading enjoyment prior to the closure was positively correlated with changes in their reading enjoyment and reading amount during the closure, for both print and digital formats. Despite the ubiquity of devices, devices were underutilised for reading purposes. Students demonstrated a clear preference for print reading over reading digitally both before and during the school closure and relied more on home than online resources for reading materials. Changes in time spent on devices during school closure were not related to changes in digital reading amount, but negatively related to changes in reading enjoyment and print reading amount over the same period, suggesting more time on devices may not naturally lead to more reading digitally.
Lebanon education in crisis: raising the alarm
Institution: Save the Children
Published: April 2021
At least 1.2 million children across Lebanon have had their education disrupted for more than one year, with many having last attended school in October 2019, following protests and civil unrest. This is impacting Lebanese, Syrian and Palestinian children alike. With the country slipping deeper into an economic crisis, a safe and systematic school reopening in Lebanon is difficult to imagine. Even before this, children across the country already had lower than average literacy and numeracy rates in the Middle East region. This brief by Save the Children calls for global attention and action on the unfolding education crisis in Lebanon.  It draws from national and global data sources, sectoral recommendations, and the experiences of children in the country.

Revisiting the impact of covid-19 on adolescents in urban slums in Dhaka, Bangladesh: round 2

AUTHOR(S)
Samira Ahmed Raha; Md. Sajib Rana; Saklain Al Mamun Al Mamun (et al.)

Institution: Gender and Adolescence Global Evidence
Published: March 2021

This research is part of the Gender and Adolescence: Global Evidence (GAGE) programme, a nine-year, mixed methods longitudinal research and evaluation programme following the lives of 20,000 adolescents in six low- and middle-income countries. BRAC James P Grant School of Public Health (BRAC JPGSPH) and the BRAC Institute of Governance and Development (BIGD) partnered to carry out rapid-response research in Dhaka to gain an understanding of vulnerable and underprivileged adolescents’ lives during the pandemic. This policy brief presents findings from the second round of data collection which included 30 in-depth interviews with adolescents living in three sites in Dhaka. Findings show inequalities in access to and continuation of distance education, negative effects in psychosocial well-being, unequal access to digital connectivity, financial constraints, with inequalities between different socio-economic classes, gender and age groups, which put them at risk of discontinuing education, entering into child labour and also early marriage.

The new identity of Indonesian Islamic boarding schools in the “new normal”: the education leadership response to COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Yusuf Hanafi; Ahmad Taufiq; Muhammad Saefi (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Heliyon
The purpose of this study was to investigate the leadership practices of Indonesian Islamic boarding school (pesantren) leaders, school principals, and teachers in responding to the health crisis caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, to ensure the continuation of boarding school education in the “new normal” period. Generated using a moderated focus group discussion with principals and teachers, the findings suggest that principals' and teachers' leadership practices are acceptable in the policy, social support, and financial dimensions but still lack structural and teaching aspects about conducting blended learning.
Early impact of school closure and social distancing for COVID-19 on the number of inpatients with childhood non-COVID-19 acute infections in Japan

AUTHOR(S)
Kenji Kishimoto; Seiko Bun; Jung-ho Shin (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: European Journal of Pediatrics
Many countries have implemented school closures as part of social distancing measures intended to control the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The aim of this study was to assess the early impact of nationwide school closure (March–May 2020) and social distancing for COVID-19 on the number of inpatients with major childhood infectious diseases in Japan.
Shaping the COVID decade: addressing the long-term societal impacts of COVID-19
Institution: British Academy
Published: March 2021

In September 2020, the British Academy was asked by the Government Office for Science to produce an independent review to address the question: What are the long-term societal impacts of COVID-19? This short but substantial question led us to a rapid integration of evidence and an extensive consultation process. As history has shown us, the effects of a pandemic are as much social, cultural and economic as they are about medicine and health. This study aimed to deliver an integrated view across these areas to start understanding the long-term impacts and how to address them. This evidence review concluded that there are nine interconnected areas of long-term societal impact arising from the pandemic which could play out over the coming COVID decade, ranging from the rising importance of local communities, to exacerbated inequalities and a renewed awareness of education and skills in an uncertain economic climate.

Emergency remote teaching during the COVID-19 pandemic: parents experiences and perspectives

AUTHOR(S)
Ozge Misirli; Funda Ergulec

Published: March 2021   Journal: Education and Information Technologies
he coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused an emergency transform from traditional to distance learning at all levels of education, which is called emergency remote teaching. To explore parents’ views on students’ experiences of remote teaching during the COVID-19 pandemic, and their experience and perspectives toward remote teaching during the lockdown of the COVID-19 pandemic, a questionnaire was developed and distributed to parents who have at least one child who had attended a face-to-face learning environment prior to school closures and started remote teaching during the pandemic. 983 parents participated in the study. The parents’ views on students’ experiences of remote teaching during the COVID19 pandemic, their experiences and perspectives toward remote teaching were discussed. The results suggested that the remote teaching process has been challenging for both students and parents.
Adaptations of music education in primary and secondary school due to COVID-19: the experience in Spain

AUTHOR(S)
Diego Calderón-Garrido; Josep Gustems-Carnicer

Published: March 2021   Journal: Music Education Research
COVID-19 caused an essential confinament in order to limit its expansion. Globally, this led to a reconsideration of education processes. The study’s purpose is to analyse how compulsory education music teachers in Spain adapted. To gather the data, 335 teachers were surveyed. The participants preferred to continue teaching in most cases. However, this situation forced them into an adaptation in which preference was given to contemplative activities. These adaptations were marked by a lack of methodological and material resources. A common complaint was the lack of specific instructions from government bodies. In addition, a difference was observed between public, private and semi-private schools. Interestingly, the teachers considered that the situation had enabled them to have more contact with students, even though the learning was asynchronous.
School personnel and parents’ concerns related to COVID-19 pandemic’s impact related to schools

AUTHOR(S)
Jacqueline R. Anderson; Jennifer L Hughes; Madhukar H. Trivedi

Published: March 2021   Journal: School Psychology Review
In March 2020, the majority of schools in the United States transitioned to distance learning in order to reduce the spread of COVID-19. Little data is available on the impact of this abrupt transition on youth, but many experts have expressed concerns about the implications of this major change in schooling on mental health and academic outcomes. The current study sought to gain insight on parent and school personnel (n = 515, n = 193) concerns about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic related schools and the return to school within two cohorts (summer 2020, fall 2020). Primary concerns were student health, student academic development, personal health, and student mental health. These findings may assist schools in their preparation for the transitions related to COVID-19 and changes in the school year to provide resources for their families to promote their students’ development and support their school personnel’s health.
The gendered consequences of a weak infrastructure of care: school reopening plans and parents’ employment during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Caitlyn Collins; Leah Ruppanner; Liana Christin Landivar (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Gender & Society
The COVID-19 pandemic has upended in-person public education across the United States, a critical infrastructure of care that parents—especially mothers—depend on to work. To understand the nature and magnitude of school closures across states, this study collected detailed primary data—the Elementary School Operating Status database (ESOS)—to measure the percentage of school districts offering in-person, remote, and hybrid instruction models for elementary schools by state in September 2020. These data have been linked to the Current Population Survey to evaluate the association between school reopening and parents’ labor force participation rates, comparing 2020 labor force participation rates to those observed prepandemic in 2019.
COVID-19 and student well-being: stress and mental health during return-to-school

AUTHOR(S)
Kelly Dean Schwartz; Deinera Exner-Cortens; Carly A. McMorris (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Canadian Journal of School Psychology
Students have been multiply impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic: threats to their own and their family’s health, the closure of schools, and pivoting to online learning in March 2020, a long summer of physical distancing, and then the challenge of returning to school in fall 2020. As damaging as the physical health effects of a global pandemic are, much has been speculated about the “second wave” of mental health crises, particularly for school-aged children and adolescents. Yet, few studies have asked students about their experiences during the pandemic. The present study engaged with over two thousand (N = 2,310; 1,288 female; Mage = 14.5) 12- to 18-year-old Alberta students during their first few weeks of return-to-school in fall 2020.
Socioeconomic impacts of COVID-19 in low-income countries

AUTHOR(S)
Anna Josephson; Talip Kilic; Jeffrey D. Michler

Published: March 2021   Journal: Nature Human Behaviour
The emergence of SARS-CoV-2 and attempts to limit its spread have resulted in a contraction of the global economy. This study documents the socioeconomic impacts of the pandemic among households, adults and children in low-income countries. To do so, it relies on longitudinal household survey data from Ethiopia, Malawi, Nigeria and Uganda, originating from pre-COVID-19 face-to-face household surveys plus phone surveys implemented during the pandemic. 256 million individuals—77% of the population—are estimated to live in households that have lost income during the pandemic. Attempts to cope with this loss are exacerbated by food insecurity and an inability to access medicine and staple foods. Finally, this study finds that student– teacher contact has dropped from a pre-COVID-19 rate of 96% to just 17% among households with school-aged children. These findings can inform decisions by governments and international organizations on measures to mitigate the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.